Your University Interview – Advice & Tips

Your University Interview – Advice & Tips

October 18, 2019 6 By Stanley Isaacs


For some students the application to higher
education involves an additional stage:
an interview. This will normally only affect those who are
applying for a very competitive and popular institution, a vocational course that leads into a direct profession or a course that requires a specific skill set such as music or arts based subjects. If you know you have to attend an interview
it is important that you don’t panic, instead, spend some time planning for the
day, reviewing your application and researching
your chosen institution to ensure that everything runs as smoothly
as possible. Your interview should be viewed as an extension
of your UCAS form, it is an opportunity for you to expand on
the information that you have included within your personal statement and for you to further
demonstrate your commitment to your subject area. Some students find that a strong performance
at interview can lead to a reduced offer or act as a lifeline on results day should
they not receive the initial grades that they were hoping for, therefore making sure that you represent yourself
in the best possible way is key. Before you attend the interview there are
several things that you can do to prepare. Firstly establishing all of your travel arrangements,
you might be familiar with the route to a campus, but locating the building and room you that you will be in could take some time. Leave plenty of time for travelling in case
of roadworks and delays on public transport and make sure you have the contact details
of the interview organiser should you need to ring to advise that you will be late. It is also worth revising your personal statement
and reminding yourself of its content, some interviewers may base initial questions
on this, so for example, if you have mentioned that
you have completed the Duke of Edinburgh award they might ask you what additional skills
you have gained from this activity. The interviewer is likely to ask you about
your further education choices, what you enjoy and how you have developed
as a student. They may also ask why you have chosen to apply
to this course and this particular institution so researching the university in advance,
having an understanding of the modules included in that particular programme and knowing what
attracts you to them is a real benefit. If you are applying for a vocational course
such as teaching, nursing or physiotherapy then a thorough and accurate understanding
of what the job will entail will demonstrate both a commitment and a passion for it. During your interview it is important that
you try and relax and be yourself. Remember to smile and make eye contact with
others in the room and don’t be afraid to take a few moments to consider your reply to any questions before you begin to answer them. Interviewers will be looking for engaged students
so having some of your own questions relating to the course or the university is a really
good way of showing this. Some students are asked to bring samples of
their work to show, and others may still wish to even if they
are not asked to. In both cases make sure that it is clearly
labelled with your name and where appropriate laid out in a clear manner to be looked through. If you have letters of recommendation or certificates
that you would like to share then you may choose to present them in a document wallet
or folder. Once your interview is over the most important
thing for you to do is relax and try not to over analyse your answers
you cant change them now. Once you have had a drink and something to
eat you might want to make some notes on what you felt went well and any areas that you
think could have been improved on further. These can then be used almost as a revision
tool for any future interviews. And don’t be afraid to contact universities
for feedback, whether it be good or bad
it can be vital to shaping
your interview technique as a whole.