Why You SHOULDN’T Apply to an Ivy League School | What Nobody Will Tell You (2019)

Why You SHOULDN’T Apply to an Ivy League School | What Nobody Will Tell You (2019)

August 15, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi, I’m Greg, and today, I am going to tell
you why you should NOT apply to an Ivy League college, or basically any other top school
that you want to go to. As a college admissions YouTuber, I want to
be 100% transparent with you about what you’re getting into when you apply to and attend
an Ivy League school. I discovered a lot of this crucial information soon after starting
my freshman year at Princeton, and by that point it was already too late. In fact, I really wish somebody had made this
video for me when I was applying to college. Now, if you’re anything like me, you’ve
watched hours of college YouTube videos, asked every resource out there how you can get into
an Ivy League school, and are under the impression that if you get accepted into an Ivy League
school, everything will be great and work out for you. This is just simply not the case. Today, I’ve
decided to compile a list of all the things I don’t like about Princeton that I believe
apply to other top schools as well. I’m not going to lie, this was a really tough video
to make, but I’m going to say some things that really need to be said, and haven’t yet
been said here on YouTube, so buckle up and listen carefully. For those of you who don’t know what the
Ivy league college student’s schedule looks like, we actually have a lot less class time
than we did in high school. For example, I only have 3-4 classes a day, each of one runs
between 50-80 minutes, AND I don’t even have class on Fridays. That’s only like, 16 hours a week! I mean,
in addition to that, I’m the business manager for my a cappella group, which takes up about
7 hours a week, and I’m a volunteer for Matriculate, a nonprofit through which I offer
college consulting services for underprivileged students, and that takes maximum 2 hours a
week. Adding that all up, that’s around 25 hours
a week, total – which is a little more than half of the commitment of your average 40
hour work week. Add YouTube onto that, and we’re looking at about 35 hours a week of
class and activities. I’m going to tell you now that the #1 thing
I hate about Princeton and other elite colleges is that I spend all my time keeping up with
the fast-paced environment of the school, and don’t have much time to develop myself.
Now, how can this be the case when I’m in half as much class as a high school student? Part of the answer to this question is the
insane amount of homework that we are assigned for each class. Of course, this varies by
your major and the actual college that you’re attending, you know, not looking at Harvard
or anything… but seriously, homework at Ivy League schools is pretty ridiculous. I’m going to give you a real life example
of a class that I’m in to show you what I’m talking about. The class is called Introduction
to Programming Systems, and it’s a required prerequisite for my major, Computer Science.
On average, we have about one homework assignment due every week and a half or so. The website for my most recent assignment
reports that the homework takes, on average, 12 hours to complete (it took me around 15).
Four days after that due date, we had a midterm exam. Oh and don’t forget, I had three other
midterm exams for my other classes, and assignments of comparable length. Altogether, on average, completing these assignments
takes about five hours a day. That’s an extra 35 hours per week, putting us at around
70 hours of pure work, class, activities, every week. Now, that amount of work for a
college student is unsustainable, and I’m about to show you why, but it’s pretty much
the schedule of most of my friends and a lot of other Ivy League students that I know. But before I get into real research that I
have done on the ways that the Ivy League’s workload negatively affects its student body,
I want to thank you all for 10,000 SUBSCRIBERS! To thank you guys, I will be doing a Q & A
for my next video, so leave a comment if you have any questions about my life, my friends,
anything like that and they will be answered in the next video. Also, please give this video a like because
it took a lot of time to think about and produce. AND subscribe to my channel for more information
about college admissions, SAT prep, and college life. Now, there are two main ways that the extreme
workload I’ve been talking about affects Ivy League college students in a negative
way. First, it promotes a very competitive, sink or swim environment in which most students
do not care about their mental health, suffer from imposter syndrome, and are generally
very unhappy during what is supposed to be “the best four years of your life.” Second, it gives students little to no time
to think about how they actually want to apply these elite degrees to the real world, making
it really easy for companies to push careers on to students that they didn’t necessarily
want. First, let’s talk about students’ mental
health. Tiger Confessions is a private facebook group where Princeton students can submit
confessions anonymously; many students make jokes, talk about crushes, or express their
feelings over the anonymous platform. Many, if not all Princeton students are either part
of the group or know of its existence, so I feel that the contents of the page are a
pretty good representation of the feelings of the Princeton student body as a whole. I took all 71 confessions that were posted
on Thursday of last week and counted up how many of them included some sort of college-related
complaint or some general life complaint. Out of 71 posts, 21 were negative and mentioned
Princeton directly by name, and about a third of those included the words “depression”
or “mental health” exactly. There were also eight posts about general
anxiety, stress, sadness that did not reference Princeton directly. So, overall, 29 out of
71 posts, approximately 41% of Princeton students who posted on that day, were unsatisfied,
feeling dumb, sad, depressed, alone, overworked, you name it. So much for the Ivy League making
you feel happy forever and ever. Now, I know that there are all sorts of biases
going on here and correlation doesn’t imply causation, but this statistic is too important
to ignore. Going to an Ivy League school will NOT, by itself, make you happy. So now you know that we Ivy League students
are working super hard to stay on top of our course load and in the process we’re confused
and upset because we don’t have time to take care of our mental health. This is a gold
mine for investment banks, management consulting firms, big tech companies, and even non profits
who are looking for super smart, fresh employees who are used to being overworked and unfulfilled
to do all of the grunt work in their businesses. I mean, it’s undeniable. I get at least two
invitations to “networking events” every single week in my Princeton email. Recruiters will wear fancy suits, they’ll
take you to really nice dinners, and they’ll talk to you all about the 6 figure income
you’re going to make right out of college. You will feel important, you will feel successful,
but according to millionaire entrepreneur Steve Papa who visited Princeton just a few
weeks ago, you will burn out, and you will realize you are not following your life purpose
(at least in most cases). Steve receives hundreds of job applications from former investment
bankers and management consultants, and apparently they are accepted into his company at much
lower rates than average, simply because they are unmotivated and they have lost touch with
their creativity and critical thinking skills. It’s crazy to me how the world’s brightest
minds are being sucked into doing nothing but making vast amounts of money for huge,
huge companies that aren’t helping anyone. The Ivy League makes it really easy for companies
to push careers onto students who have not had time to properly figure out what they
want to do with their life, and that really sucks. Now, I didn’t make this video to imply that
you should not go to an Ivy League school under any circumstances. Despite all of what
I have said in this video, I am super happy that I chose to go to Princeton– the connections
I’ve made here with my friends, the trips I’ve gone on with my a cappella group, and
some of the classes I have taken have all helped me to grow as a person. Luckily, I’ve also been doing lots of self
reflection and my work on this YouTube channel has actually helped me to discover what I
think my life purpose is. Now that you know what I have told you about
Ivy League colleges, I wish you the best in your college search– honestly, I really do.
I still think that Ivy League colleges are great, and they’re a great tool to help you
achieve your goals. It’s just important that you separate what your goals are from what
other people say that your goals should be. If you want to maximize your chances of getting
into college, check out the rest of my videos and hit that subscribe button to be notified
whenever I post another one. That’s it for today guys, peace.