What will it be like to study at a university?

What will it be like to study at a university?

October 9, 2019 7 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi and congratulations. If you’re watching
this video, it probably means you’ve got
your results, and you know you’re coming to join
the University of York. . Welcome. So what would be like to
study at a university? Wherever you studied
before, at school, college, or further education,
studying at university is a very different
experience in many ways. We’d like to explain what
some of the differences are and talk about
what will be handy for you to understand
before you start. Let’s begin with
the fact that you’re about to become a
member of a university. Being at university means being
part of an academic community. Suddenly you’ll be
surrounded by people with a real passion for
your chosen subject. You’ll be taught by people
who are experts in their field and study alongside
like-minded students. You’ll also be encouraged
to have your own opinions and to learn and
think for yourself rather than expecting
someone to tell you everything you want to know. That sounds scary at
first, but many students think this is the best thing
about studying at university. Let’s pick up on what it
means to think and learn for yourself. At university, you’ll start
to take responsibility for your own learning and
managing your own time and for making the best
of the opportunities available at York. Before, you might
have spent days in the classroom
being told everything you needed to write
assignments or pass exams. That’s not how it
works at university. Here, the lectors
will give you sort of taster or overview of
the topic and the areas you need to explore. The rest is up to you to
research and find for yourself. It’s called being an
independent learner. With independent learning comes
different ways of working. At university, full-time study
means you study full time. That’s around 40 hours a week. Your study time will be
split between taught time and self-study time. You’ll attend lectures,
seminars, and tutorials. Some of you will also attend
rehearsals, laboratory work, or field trips. Self-study is your time spent
in the library, computer rooms, and study spaces,
giving you the freedom to learn in ways
that suit you best. Our students love the
flexibility to choose how, where, and when they study,
and the space to research, consider, and present back their
own work for assessment, which leads us nicely onto
assessment and exams. The way your
assessed may be quite different to the ways you
been marked or graded before. At the beginning, the marking
system might seem tougher, and how you submit
your work may vary too, for example, long
essays or practicals. You’ll need to be prepared
for the jump between A Levels and university grading,
as it’s a big step up. But don’t worry or get stressed
if your first piece of work comes back at a
different grade to those you’re used to getting. That’s normal. It’s all about progression. The study journey throughout
your degree program means you should see
yourself steadily improve and your grades get
better over time. Now a quick word from our
sponsors about study behaviors. At university, there are
strict rules and regulations about good study behaviors. It’s what we call
academic integrity. These ensure it’s clear
whose work and thoughts you are presenting. It’s rules like, don’t cheat,
don’t copy, and collaborate in the wrong ways, and
good academic behaviors like referencing
your work properly by saying where you got
your information from. Don’t worry. We’ll tell you more about
this when you get here, and there’s an academic
integrity tutorial you have to complete
in your first term to help you understand what
you should and shouldn’t do. That wraps it up. There’s lots of
support at hand to help you make the jump from
higher education to studying at university. You’ll have the support
of teachers and lecturers and a supervisor to check how
you’re doing with your studies. It’s easy to contact
or visit them. We’ve also got loads of
study support systems, courses, and drop-in centers
to help you learn more about things like research,
writing academic papers, referencing, math skills,
where you can even learn a language
if you’d like to. So in summary, being
at a university is a new way of learning. It’s challenging and
rewarding, and we’re there to help you make
the most of what will be a great experience. See you soon.