Voice Teacher Reacts to Dimash Kudaibergen – SOS

Voice Teacher Reacts to Dimash Kudaibergen – SOS

November 30, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi my name is Sam Johnson and I am a
voice teacher. To learn more about me or to sign up for lessons go to my website
vocalease.net. I’m gonna be reacting to Dimash singing SOS. So confident. You can tell he knows he’s about to just do something cool. Nice French “R”. That “R” is kind of hard.
In classical music usually they flip it they go pourquoi versus pourquoi in
classical music. But he’s singing current music that little R is interesting it
raises your tongue in the back, and then it just kind of buzzes with your hard
palate. Cool, so he starts at the bottom. It’s a
really big sound but then as he starts going up it gets lighter every single
time because he’s preparing for his bridge. But he doesn’t start the
lightness at the bridge, he starts it well before. It’s just that first one he
started in complete chest voice so that he would feel his vocal cords together
and be able to carry that sensation up. He’s a countertenor. I really respect those staccato parts up
at the top of his voice. Being able to control his airflow so that it
stays consistent while breaking it up like that in the middle is really hard
because our tendency is on onsets and offsets for the breath flow to change. For
it to either be more breath or less breath. He’s starting with a very
controlled, very small amount of air. He made that vowel kind of like a
classical female singer, where it’s a little bit further back sounding. It’s
very round and it’s tuning to the fundamental harmonic. I’m pretty sure
based on how that sounds it’s not tuning to the second harmonic or third like you
might in a mix. And because of that it doesn’t have a ton of energy up in the
top top part of the spectrum. It just sounds a little bit Hollow
through it. It’s a great strategy, I mean there’s a reason why people do it and it
produced that kind of rounder sound. And then he goes back to more of a mix where
it’s it’s more forward there’s a lot more cord closure with it. And that’s why it doesn’t sound as
breathy as the one before. He’s going back and forth between this
gentle, beautiful, small, low-volume kind of rounder classical voice where it’s
very round and very small to a really whiny, forward, intense — he’s going back
and forth, but he has control of those shades in between. He doesn’t have to be
at one extreme or the other, he’s moving between them to get to the extremes and
that’s very skilled. Usually if it starts falling back if the
sound falls back it’s on a more open vowel like ah or oh.
Generally it falling back means his tongue is pulling back it’s a way to
suppress the larynx so if you find your larynx, with girls it’s kind of harder
with guys we get a big bump. But if you find this hard cartilage area in here
and swallow it comes all the way up. If you if you kind of pull your tongue back
or go like this your larynx drops, and that’s how you
make it kind of hootier sound. What he’s doing is for an effect he wants
that sound from this he is way too good to be doing this on accident. Up to the E!? But he slid up to it that’s
why it worked for him. So he slid up to it he didn’t try to just attack that
high E he started like a 7th below, and then slid up to it. That allowed his
vocal cords to stretch out even though it was very quick they were able to
stretch out and still find a balanced place. He also didn’t crescendo as he
went up. One thing that’s kind of crazy is an octave above something I think
doubles the amount of sounds that’s perceived by the listener. So because he
moved from that down there where it was it was a little bit lower (It’s insane
saying that an E4 is a low note, or an E5 is a low note) but then he jumps up. The
perceived volume is going to also jump up by 100%, and so he
compensates for that by pulling back on volume. It’s kind of like he’s decrescendoing on the way up, which along with the glide helps make that a very
easy very smooth very beautiful note on the top. It’s still a round sound its robust. I kind of
like thinking of it like a tweeter and woofer. If you only have tweeter the
sounds gonna be kind of brittle. If you only have a woofer it’s gonna be really
wolfy and you’re not gonna be able to hear any of the high overtones with it.
He’s not neglecting either of them. He’s letting both of them have a say in this,
and it’s a nice sound. It does sound more classical, because he has a little bit
more of the (UH) sound to it. Good, so on the word haut you can see
how wide he’s going. It’s gonna be very difficult to get pure oh up at a D5 in
mixed voice like that. And in like a really strong mixed voice if you’re
leaning into it as much as he is right now it’s gonna just be super hard for it to be that round so he opens it up. And it’s
high enough that he has to. That’s the only way that he can produce that tone. Interesting on that last one – ooh and
then he leans into it. On that last one enfant is usually nasalized, and I like
nasal sounds because it helps me find more cord closure usually. A little bit
more balanced than cord closure. On that last one he didn’t want cord closure. He
was singing so breathy for effect, that if he went to the __ that would pop out of the texture, so he doesn’t nasalise that vowel he just says ___
and by doing that it can keep a consistent tone until he wants to lean
into the cord closure, which he does at the end with his crescendo from ah. He
crescendoed in volume, and he also crescendoed in amount of cord closure
intensity. That guy’s a rock star. Dimash is awesome. He has complete
control over his voice there are very few things you can say that he’s doing
wrong because they all sound intentional, and all of them are pretty healthy. You
can’t sing the way that he’s doing if it’s unhealthy. Like these extremes of
the voice the really really high notes and going that small with volume, and
then back to that loud of volume, and using all of the shades in between– you
can’t do that if you’re singing something poorly. He’s proof he’s not
really doing much that’s super inefficient because it’s consistent. You
never are questioning whether he’s gonna hit a note, it’s just there. He just does
it and because of that as an audience member we can just watch him and not be concerned with if he’s gonna sing something right. We can just be like oh
my gosh he’s so good what’s going on and what’s he saying and I’m so invested in
the story and now you’re telling me the story cuz he’s a good storyteller, and
all of that stuff the most important part of of singing the storytelling is
what we can focus on rather than having to focus on technique like I did in this
video. I mean for this video series I am just breaking down technique but it’s
because of the technique that he can do whatever he wants and people are just in
the palm of his hand all the way through it. He can make people care greatly about
story rather than technique, and I think that’s a win. Thanks for watching please
smash that subscribe button like it leave a comment in the bottom I can’t
believe I just said smash that subscribe button but yeah I really appreciate it.
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