UWA Graduations – Friday March 16, 7:00pm

UWA Graduations – Friday March 16, 7:00pm

November 8, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Good evening everyone. You’ve beaten me
to it, but please join me again in thanking the university organist Annette Goerke. Welcome – kaya – my name is Professor Cara MacNish and I’m the chair of the Academic Board, the peak academic body of the
University. I’m here to tell you a little about tonight’s graduation ceremony, its
history, the people involved and how this evening’s events will proceed. Before
proceedings commence, could I please request that your mobile telephones are
turned down or off and advise that should an emergency occur in the venue,
we’ll take our lead from the theatre staff. On behalf of all my university
colleagues, I’m delighted to welcome you all to this evening’s graduation ceremony.
To begin I’d like to acknowledge that our ceremony tonight takes place on Wadjuk Budja, the country of the Noongar people, and pay my respects to Noongar
our elders past, present and emerging, as custodians of the historic place on
which we meet. And I’m pleased to say that we will have a formal welcome to
country this evening from Barry McGuire. Today’s graduation ceremony is also a
traditional celebration of the University. UWA takes great pride in its
history, having enrolled its first students over a hundred years ago.
However our roots are deeply embedded in the academic values and traditions that
for many centuries have given rise to the world’s finest universities. The
traditional nature of our graduation ceremony serves to highlight this
enduring connection with our heritage, as has been the case in universities across
the globe, and throughout the centuries. The ceremony will begin with the arrival
of the academic procession. This procession comprises graduates, scholars
academics, and office bearers of the University, attired in their formal
academic regalia. UWA is very much an international
institution and our academic staff come from universities from a wide variety of
countries and cultures. So in this evening’s procession you will see a
varied and often colourful array of regalia from around the world. The
procession will be led by graduating students, followed by academic staff, in
order of seniority. At the end of the procession will come the principal
officers of the University, members of the University’s governing body the
Senate, and our distinguished guests. The final figure in the procession will be
the Pro-Chancellor of the University Dr Penelope Flett, who is immediately
preceded by the mace bearer. The mace will be carried by a current student and
is a symbolic representation of the authority vested in the Chancellor, who
is the Chair of the University Senate. After the national anthem, the Pro-chancellor will formally welcome all graduates and guests, and guide us
through the ceremony. During the ceremony there will be a short musical interlude
performed by students of the UWA School of Music. You will, I
believe, find much to interest you during this evening’s processions. But of course,
the main reason you have come is to witness the graduation of our scholars,
and I hope you will all join with my colleagues and me in warmly
congratulating each scholar who comes onto this stage to have his or her
degree conferred. And while it is an historic setting, it is also a
celebration, and I invite you to express your enthusiasm wholeheartedly, as our
graduates are awarded their degrees. There will be a professional
video and photographs of the ceremony and professional photographers waiting
downstairs, but please do feel free to stand where
you are to capture your own images of the moment.
Now would you please all rise to your feet so that the arrival of the academic
procession can commence. Thank you. [Organ plays]
[Academic procession enters] Please be seated. Members of the University, Senate,
distinguished guests, graduates, ladies and gentlemen. It is a pleasure to
welcome you to our ninth autumn graduation ceremony, and I particularly
wish to acknowledge the presence at the ceremony of Miss Simone Young AM, who
will be awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Music and will deliver the
graduation address and her guests, Miss Kate Milligan who will deliver the
valedictory address and her guests, the Warden of Convocation Dr Doug McGhie,
Members of Senate, Emeritus Professor Jim Everett, former honorary degree
recipients Dr Iain Grandage and Dr Sue Boyd, former Chancellor’s Medal
recipients Dr Joan Pope OAM, Miss Joan Robbins and Mrs Annette Goerke.
Now at this point, it’s a tradition of the university to pay respects to Aboriginal people, the
custodians of the land upon which we are going to have our ceremony. We usually
have a Welcome to Country but unfortunately at the last minute the
person who does this so beautifully for us is unexpectedly indisposed.
So I will acknowledge the custodians and traditional owners of the land on which
the university campuses are located and at this main campus Crawley. The
university acknowledges the Wadjuk people of the Noongar nation as the
traditional owners of the land upon which we are situated tonight. The
Wadjuk Noongar remained the spiritual and cultural custodians of their land
and continue to practice their values, their languages, their beliefs and their
knowledge. So this evening we share in a ceremony
which has been deeply rooted in the history and tradition of universities in
this country and around the world. And it marks the formal recognition by the
University of the achievement of its graduates, in meeting the standards and
requirements of the various courses of study and research which they’ve
undertaken at this place over a number of years. The ceremony joins them with
members of the academic staff who’ve taught them or supervised their work, and
with representatives of the Convocation of the University which is part of the
University, and which as graduates they will join. The ceremony also brings
graduates together with parents, friends and other relatives who have supported
these graduates in their work and share intimately with their achievements. We
have a long history of achievement and excellence in teaching and research and
engagement with the wider community, for the benefit of the state, the nation and
indeed the global community of which we are all part. It was established in the
words of the University Act in 1911, to advance the prosperity and welfare of
the people. It was the product of the vision and energy and commitment of
extraordinary individuals who founded it, and were its benefactors. So the
university’s achievements are not the achievements of an institution,
they are the achievements of people who teach and research here, who govern
and administer the University, and the alumni who go from this place to make
their contributions in a myriad of different ways. And it’s not just a
degree with which you leave this place. It’s a degree from the University of
Western Australia, which is one of Australia’s leading universities, and
according to international rankings, one of the world’s leading universities. So
each of you who graduate tonight will be presented with a Noongar message
stick. Carrying with it, the story of this special place. And according to
Indigenous beliefs, tribal boundaries were established by the great spirits of
the Dreamtime. No human had the right to interfere with those boundaries or to
venture on to other tribal land, but the bearer of a message stick could cross
those boundaries. The sticks were traditional passports from one nation to
another in Indigenous Australia, and they’re seen as carrying the stories of
Indigenous people across the land. So in a symbolic way we entrust the story of
this place to you to. Carry it into the world. The gift symbolises a permanent
connection expressed in the timeless language of Noongar people. For all of
you, I express the hope that the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired at
this university will enable you to follow the lifelong path reflected in
its motto to seek wisdom, and to apply it for the good of all. Ladies and gentlemen,
it’s now my pleasure to invite the Vice-Chancellor Professor Dawn
Freshwater to give a brief opening address to today’s graduates and all
their guests. Pro-Chancellor, graduates, parents,
partners, and friends of the University, congratulations. It is my privilege to
congratulate you on behalf of the University of Western Australia.
Tonight’s ceremony is an opportunity for all of us, graduating students, parents
and friends and staff to formally recognise and celebrate your outstanding
achievement in graduating from this University. Graduation is a culmination
of many years of hard work and I hope that you’ll remember your time as a UWA
student with pride, excitement and accomplishment. During your time here, you
will of course enjoy many moments of great joy and satisfaction, as well as
some setbacks and challenges. The disciplines that you’ve chosen to study
within the Arts, and the ones that you’ve immersed yourself in, will significantly
prepare you for the future at many levels, and you should feel a great sense
of pride at how those years of persistence and resilience have paid off.
You sit in this great hall with your fellow graduates, surrounded by your
loved ones. Celebrate and look into the future with ambition and purpose. We know
that we’ve provided you with something great, but it’s more than a world-class
education. Being a student is much more than providing you with access to
academic excellence. I hope that you’ve found your time here at UWA as a student
entertaining in many other ways, and have become involved in many facets of
campus life. Clubs, societies, internships, work integrated learning, overseas
exchange programs, and many more activities. All of these experiences have
offered you an opportunity to further develop your skills, and prepare you for
the future. Our graduates have been making a difference for many, many
decades as you’ve heard at a local and national,
and an international level, and we know that much has changed during that time.
And that our graduates are now emerging into a rapidly changing world. In Arts,
one of our English graduates went on to pursue a career in writing, becoming a
journalist at the Sydney Morning Herald where she worked as an arts writer and a
literary editor. After a decade of working with The Sydney Morning Herald,
she left to co-found and run the Sydney Story Factory, a not-for-profit creative
writing centre for marginalised young people. Her mantra has been to pursue
what she loves, and what she thinks is important, clearly demonstrated and a
life full of storytelling that has contributed to the greater community. New
graduates should also feel confident that you are well-prepared to take your
place in a highly competitive working environment. The fact that you’re sitting
here this evening proves that you’ve mastered subject matter, concepts,
techniques and acquired skills that equip you for lifelong learning. You are
of course also graduating at a time when the rise of populism has borne such terms
as fake news, post truths, and alternative facts. Globalisation has indeed brought
many opportunities and it’s also provided us from areas for critical
debate and intelligent dialogue, and graduates this is why it’s never been
more important that the knowledge that you’ve gained is applied to societal
issues. I urge you to use the knowledge and skills you’ve learned, especially the
power of critical thinking to rally against this trend and demonstrate that
knowledge, facts, and evidence matter. Some commentators are suggesting that
graduates of the future are likely to have five careers and up to 17 jobs. Well
40 percent of jobs may change, they won’t disappear,
and graduates you will be creating employment opportunities for graduates
of the future. We hope that your UWA degree will empower and equip you to
succeed in a career of your choosing. Possibly one that is still to be created.
But each of you has the capacity to make a difference to society, whether it is
through some major arts project or through some business innovation.
Importantly throughout your studies you will have embraced the capacity to
change, to provide innovative solutions, and to question and be open to new ideas
and possibilities. This is indeed an exciting time for you. Many of the
graduates here tonight are already making their mark during the year.
Several graduates have also been recognised with awards and honours for
their important achievements in education. This faculty has awarded a
total of two hundred and twenty-nine prizes and scholarships in 2017 – an
incredible achievement. Your faculty also had one hundred and
sixty six students take part in Study Abroad programs in universities around
the world from Alabama to Ottawa to Japan. What a wonderful way to get some
international experience and education. I’m delighted that you have chosen to
study at this university and of course we’re sorry to see you leave, but we know
that this is not farewell, because you will always be a part of the UWA
community. You will always be welcome here, and we will do our best to support
you throughout your career. In turn we hope that you will stay connected and
remain an active alumni member. What makes UWA special and unique is that
when the university was established, our founders placed great importance on
building a community of graduates. Convocation exists to ensure that all
graduates have that lifelong connection to the University, and so graduates your
hard work and dedication have led you to this moment,
and wherever your journey leads you from here. you should be very proud of your
achievements. This is your night, enjoy it. Congratulations. It is now my pleasure to introduce our
guest speaker Simone Young. Simone is internationally recognised as one of the
leading conductors of her generation and has conducted the world’s top orchestras.
she was general manager and music director of the Hamburg state opera,
music director of the philharmonic state orchestra Hamburg, a music director of
Opera Australia and was appointed a member of the Order of Australia in the
Australia Day Honours list. Over the past few months Simon has appeared as a guest
with orchestras in Helsinki , Tokyo, Mancheste, Monte Carlo, Bern and
Australia, and this season her notable debuts will include the LA Philharmonic
and the Chicago and Detroit Symphony Orchestras. Please welcome
Simone Yong. Pro-Chancellor, graduands, parents, partners,
and Friends of the University. Firstly, congratulations to all the graduands. You
can celebrate the conclusion of years of study, commitment, hard work and hopefully
at least a little fun. Well done to all of you. I’ve had a most interesting time
Googling Australian authors, looking for quotes that were appropriate for this
speech this evening, and I was introduced by this search to a number of
interesting Australian writers and philosophers. I have to admit I had never
before heard of Ruby Rich, an early Australian feminist who was also a most
accomplished pianist, a concert pianist in fact. But I was most taken by this
statement made by her in 1976, “we have not paid our debt to the past unless we
leave the future indebted to us.” I’d like you all to remember those words as you
listen to what I have to say. We are living in an age of change at
unprecedented speed. A lot of things that were taken for granted two generations
ago are disappearing fast or have already gone. The plan then was that one
would do well at school, go to uni, graduate, get a good job in the field in
which you had studied, and then keep that job all being well, for your working
life. Now we know that today the average graduate will have a number of different
jobs in the space of one career. Some of them will be in his or her specialist
field, some perhaps in an associated field, and some perhaps even in a
completely different field or one which does not yet exist. It is unprecedented
mobility, freedom and choice. It’s exciting, it’s seductive, and for some of
you possibly, just a little scary. Freedom, choice, mobility – all very
desirable things, I think we can agree. Freedom to be whoever we want to be.
Freedom to acknowledge who we are even if that person doesn’t conform to whom
society, our peers, or our families think we should be. Choice. Choice of career
with no one able to say you can’t do this or that because of your race, gender,
religion, life choices. I wonder if you’re really aware of what an exciting and
open world you are now entering. And mobility. You can travel just about
anywhere, continue your studies, or take up work almost anywhere. The
opportunities are huge freedom, mobility and choice. Three great words which are
the birth rights of your generation but I would like to add three more.
Generosity, responsibility, and courage. And these are my wishes for your future.
I want you to enjoy your mobility, to revel in your freedoms, and I hope you’ll
make great choices. But if you really want to do something valuable for your
society, to make the future indebted to your generation, then you’ll acknowledge
that responsibility, generosity and courage turn positive opportunities for
yourself into growth and benefit for many, and I think that they are strong
values that all of us need to work on to develop. You the graduates who are today
on the brink of the next stage of your lives, and all of us old crustys up here, who if we’re really honest would have to admit that taking responsibility, being
generous and having courage are three things that don’t come easily, and that
there are many times when we have to remind ourselves to aim for these goals.
I find days like today tremendously encouraging.
I imagine that many of you have already shown great courage in facing challenges
of all kinds. Growing up is a minefield. Working out who you are and how you want
to fit in, if you want to fit in. These are big challenges in themselves.
Academic studies, competition, social pressure, parental expectations, well at
least that one’s out of the way today, proud parents here one and all. That’s a
lot for one young person to take on. Courage is difficult. We need it most
when the easy option looks its most appealing, and it brings with it
responsibility. Standing up for yourself or better still standing up for someone
else, also carries with it the responsibility to carry through. I can
challenge a stereotype, call out an injustice, push for change when the
status quo is blatantly unfair, but then I have to be ready to rebuild on the
other side. Pulling down something is relatively easy, but if you then leave a
vacuum, nothing has been achieved Freedom without responsibility is anarchy and
has no future. And to remind you of Ruby Rich, we want to have the future indebted
to us. There have been huge and great changes in the way the Western world
thinks about society in the last few years, and in the past year the Me Too
movement has had us examining how we interact with one another and hopefully
will continue to create a more balanced and fair workplace for all, because the
internet is a very powerful tool. Opposition to injustice now has a
mechanism to mobilise millions of people within a matter of hours, to spread
information more rapidly than was possible to imagine even a decade ago,
and to garner support for important causes nationally and internationally
with lightning speed. But it is also a mechanism that gives a platform to
cowards, to those who find a perverse satisfaction in destroying someone’s
reputation, and for those imposters who pose as authorities on significant
matters when they have no better research qualifications than being able
to access Google, and to those who can hide viciousness and the ugliest side of
human nature behind the anonymity of the web. This is freedom without
responsibility and without courage and without generosity. Even the most well
intentioned social movements may become selfish and turn us inwards. I’d like to
hope that your generation is the one that will demand change, and the rights
that should be inherent in society. But that we’ll also have the generosity of
spirit to have compassion for those who need time to adjust. And you have perhaps
lacked the courage in the past to face the challenges and uncertainties that
social change brings. You need to show generosity to listen to opinions that
don’t necessarily match and validate your own, and have the courage and
responsibility to inform yourself of all sides of an argument, and not just to
enjoy the comfy satisfaction of exchanges with your Facebook friends
that reaffirm your own opinion. So when you’ve gathered as much as you can of
the full picture, be courageous, make a choice, and take the
responsibility to see it through. I hesitate to make this personal, but it’s
a little hard to avoid. As you all know I’m sure my profession is one of the
last where women are definitely not yet on an equal footing with men. I’m
actually okay with that in terms of numbers at least so far, because back in
the 80s which I realised was before most of you were born, back in the 80s there
were still some symphony orchestras in the world that didn’t even accept
women players. So it’s not surprising that there were hardly any conductors
who were women. What I’m not okay with is the assumption that the men are somehow
better at it just because they’re men. Thankfully most people today would
acknowledge that kind of thinking to be pretty nonsensical, but then I look at
the small number of women in government, and have to wonder whether that thinking
still prevails in some circles, but that’s a topic for another day. My career
path was anything but direct and I hope that’s of some consolation to those
graduates who don’t really know what they want to do next. And I chose to
study music rather than law as had been expected by family and teachers. It was
my choice and one I was therefore determined to make worthwhile. Working
with other musicians, jobbing with amateur music groups, I slid into
conducting before I really knew that that was what I was doing. I rehearsed
the choir, I corrected orchestral parts and one day the doctor, the conductor, was
off sick, and I got my chance. And that’s where the heart, the courage, had to kick
in. It’s all very well to say I want to do this but being prepared to put
yourself out there, to place yourself in the line of criticism, that’s another
matter. And I’ve just lost my place. I’m doing my
first speech from an iPad and demonstrating that my generation is not
as technically savvy as yours. Just one moment, here we are, this is
where I was up to. Irrespective of your career choices, none
of you should ever have to face someone who says you can’t do this because
you’re a woman or a man, because of your racial background or your life choices
or disabilities.The law has caught up with the times and that sort of behaviour
is simply not accepted in the workplace anymore, and that’s great. But the 80s
were different. I was told to my face by senior musician, by someone I respected
professionally, that I would never be conductor because well
women just couldn’t do it. So then I made a choice to really go for that goal, to
work even harder and to prove that that unimaginative idiot was wrong. I like to
call that courage. I suspect some of my friends might simply call it my bloody
mindedness. So I worked, I dreamed and I worked some more and here I am tonight
accepting this wonderful honour from your great University. Now I look at you and I
can believe that there is plenty of courage here in this room. Some of you
will have had to fight against prejudice in your choice of study, maybe even in
your choice to study. Perhaps some of you have had to overcome adversity, financial
hardships, bullying, disability, but you did the work. You’ve persevered and
you’ve done it. A B Facey was born into poverty, never had the chance to attend
school and didn’t learn to read and write until he was in his teens. He
settled in Western Australia very young and led an extraordinary life of courage
and generosity. One phrase that comes from his pen I think fits today rather
well, “I never worried about trying something different or having a go at
something. I always believed that if you want to do something you usually can.” so
what now for this bright and promising assembly of graduands. Well rather like a great work of music there is an exposition, in which we
hear the thematic material and are impressed and moved by its beauty and
promise. Well that’s you. Now, next comes the development, the next step. How that
material is stretched, altered, modulated and developed, and that’s where you’re
headed next. I’m looking forward to the recapitulation where the goals and
promises of a great beginning are brought to an organic and satisfying
whole. I hope to see some of you in future years in various branches of the
professions and look forward to someone saying to me, do you remember that day at
the University of WA when you gave the speech. Mind you, by then I’ll probably be
so old that I won’t remember anything, but you never know. And if your coda brings some surprises well that’s fantastic.
Share your talents with others, acknowledge the amazing dedication your
teachers, lecturers, tutors and not least your parents have shown in helping you
get to today, and be generous in your thanks to them. They might not always
understand everything. Sometimes you may feel they don’t understand anything at
all. But you are living proof that they believe in your future.
My dad was a great man and had much wisdom. One of his favourite sayings was
that when he was 14 he realised his father knew absolutely nothing. But by
the time he was 21 he was astonished how much his father had learnt in the past
seven years. One of your roles in the coming years
will be to keep my generation learning, and to be kind to us when we really
don’t get it, and I don’t just mean when our computers crash and we need you for
tech help. I like to find inspiration for my work in many different and sometimes
surprising places. I find the natural world a constant
source of wonder. Be it swimming with whale sharks up at Ningaloo, watching the
sunset over the beach, hiking on a glacier in Norway, being caught in a
massive storm. In all these things I find a greatness of natural architecture that
I try to invest in the structure of a performance of a score of Bruckner
Mahler or Brahms. I find the sweetness of early Mozart’s in the infectious giggle
of a small child, or in the wonder I feel when I see a perfect flower. I find
inspiration in art, in books, in poetry and in movies and TV as well. On my
flight to Australia this week I watched the Darkest Hour, the recent movie about
Churchill and preparations for Dunkirk. At the conclusion of the film a quote
flashed up from Churchill which seemed strangely apposite for my speech tonight.
He said, “success is not final. Failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue
that counts.” So once again congratulations to you all. This is a day
to celebrate and it is the gateway to your future. Enjoy your success and face
your future with courage and generosity. Good luck one and all, you’ve earned it. I’m sure you will all agree that
Simone’s address is a fitting introduction to the primary
purpose of this ceremony, which is to confer upon graduates degrees, diplomas
and certificates of the University, and recognition of their academic
achievements. My name is Professor Benjamin Smith. I’m the Associate Dean
(Research) in the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education, and it’s my pleasure
today to present graduates to the Pro-Chancellor for conferral of the degree
of Bachelor of this University. Pro-Chancellor for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Anthropology and Sociology Clare Louise Christie Melanie Alice Dickson Giorgia Lauren Kila Finnigan Shien Yew Lim You-Jin Lim Brenda Catherine Maria McInnes Lucy Frances Moogan Shammini Muthurathinam Dilanshini Pathmarajah Zoe Helen Sutton Henry Mark Davies Taylor For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Archaeology
Jessica Lauren Green Coby Axel Heeris Shelley Ann Clare Keeley Sean Carl Liddelow Sarah Margaret Parker Olivia Pisano Matthew William Tetlaw Tessa Louise Woods For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Asian Studies
Wai To Lau Ka Wai Wendy So For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Classics and Ancient History Edward Peter Leman Anson Jacob Alexander van Delden For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Communication and Media Studies Mohamad Hazim Bin Abdul Halim Yosra Al Awadi Jack Barlow Montelle Tyra Bauernfeind Kok Chi Cheng Gabrielle Alexandra Clark Emily-Rose Evelyn Edwards Sherridan Lee Fuentes Wanyi Han Natasha Claire Harris Pavlina Hatzopoulos Charmiane Joy Khor Le Yi Amardeep Kaur Kondola Yu Yi Anthea Marie Lee Fiona Helen Angele Maddock Caris Georgia Martin Nadia Mohiuddin Elizabeth Nguyen Tran Thao Nguyen
Iona Taylor Phillips Farhan Shah Ramlan
Leah Kate Roberts Xinyan Vanessa Jane Seah Damon Luke Sutton Aaron Yuan Shan Tan Georgia Then For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in English and Cultural Studies Luke Francis Beeson
Christopher Ellis John Billington Samantha Louise Brigden Jack Francis Brockway Nisha Anne D’Cruz Finley Saffin Hoskins Eliza Grace Huston Andrew David Johnston Geoffrey Glyn Jones Grace Rose Jones Aimee Idelette Marais Emma Jane Martin Jamie Samantha Mathers Anna Louise Morey Linda Nguyen Niluka Madhu Nicholson Julian Edward Naylor Sanders Laurent George Marcel Shervington Alana Imogen Whiteley White
For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in European Studies Isobel Mary Crockett Kate Frances Kimberley For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in French Studies
Daisy Grace Aldam Emily Jayde Clifford Angen Puji Corrie-Keilig Tyler Sean White Hannah Jennifer Wood For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in German Studies
Karl Robert Schatke For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in History
Alice Carol Joy Ash Meg Phoebe Drummond-Wilson Jemma Claire Flis Samuel Robert Mccabe Mullen Michael Stevan Ninkov Breyten Benedikt Yarnda N Rijavec Nicholas James Sanderson Synn En Tessa Smith Caitlin Lucy Telford For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Italian Studies Jessica Giuseppa Caterina Pagano
For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Japanese Angelica Jane Diaz Reyes Jin Sun Gabrielle Shern Ye Ting Doris Wong Hee Sing Howard Tsz-Pok Yung For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Korean Studies
Gabriel Mary Celest Sparta For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Linguistics Connor Thomas Brown
Brenton Ross de Villiers Cyan Khoo Nicole Mary Blackwell Thatcher Yeo Eu Rae Caitlin For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Katherine Louise O’Brien For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music Studies
Joshua Luke Adams Sophia Emily Anthony Laura Rose Biemmi Shaun Alexander Fraser Shane Goh Jade Amanda Hansen Fanglin Alyssa Liew Jasmine Lee Middleton Kate Brooke Milligan Zhi Qian On
Genevieve Marisa Rose
Emily Rose Schinkel Emilia Spragg Brendan Lee Talty Mia Vukovic Eloise Victoria Wright Tsai-Hsun Annie Yang For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Philosophy Hugo George Hardisty
For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Political Science and International Relations
Sophie Jacqueline Barclay Emma Jill Bolton Eloise Lauren Catlin Alice Kimberley Corinne Champalle Alysha Lehara De Mel Rebecca Louise Didcoe Ethan Gregory Dodd Levina Ann Doray
Taarika Aulakh Dougan Isabelle Rose Eagle Flynn Martha Hill Forrest Michael Bernard George Heydon Clodagh Alexandra Hussein
Hugh Peter Hutchison Samuel Brennan Jardine Sofia Kouznetsova Anne-Marie Paisley La Salle Clare Emily Langford Gatwiri Kangai Muthoni M’Mbijiwe
Tara Alexis Ott Robert Clive Purcell Raveen Ranawake Brendon Richard Rasmussen Joshua Harris Rozells Brehany Bailey Shanahan Harrison Peter John Sharrett Jasgeet Kaur Singh Callum Robert John South Kate Ellen Storey Lauren Marie Street Maddison Mercedes Taylor-Gillett Harry George Arthur Trumble For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours
Joseph Alexander Lunardi Elizabeth Marie Arundale Dorinda Joy ‘t Hart Hannah Bailey Paul Alan Bergesio
Sarah Louise Spina Cajaglis Andrew William Elliot Andrew James Gribben
Rebecca Maria Harris Bronwen Ruth Herholdt Aaron Benjamin La Amy Naomi Kaye Maslij Samuel Michael Landro
Cheryl Ann Major William James Paparo Arabella Rose Kate Peck Hannah Rebecca Tallon Thomas Jenkin Wulff William Owen Allen Hannah Louise Cockroft Erin Drew Cooley Rohan Murray Disley Mallory Lauren Evans
Xavier Evans Juliana Lucia La Pegna
Matthew Henry Ledger Meghan Louise McLean Rachael Zoe McMinn Adam Lennox Neu
Emily Rose Goldflam Phillimore
Delia Ellen Price Troy William Reynolds Luke Sheldon Robert Joshue Christopher Santa Maria Eros Scagnetti Dale James Walter Schwass Michael James Kenneth Smith Ellen Louise Storey Katherine Madeline Swann Jackson Griffin Vickery Andrew Leonard Yallop James Lyall Youd Denise Lesley Young For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
Meenakshi Burr Lewis William Downes Robert Thomas Frederickson Patricia Violet Hallett Elizabeth Maree Munro Pamela Joy Pitt For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (Asian Studies) Sik Sik Chow AND For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (Communication Studies) Nguyen Thi Hong Hanh On behalf of this University, I confer
the degree of Bachelor upon the graduates presented to me by the
Associate Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education. The University is very proud of its
Conservatorium of Music and of the performance standards of its students. I
therefore have great pleasure in introducing a brief musical interlude by
members of the Con-Cantorum, one of the UWA vocal ensembles, who will be
performing It Was A Lover and His Lass. [Musical recital] It’s my pleasure now to present a
graduate to the Pro-Chancellor for conferral of the award of graduate
diploma of this University. For the Graduate Diploma of Strategic
Communication Isabella Nita Lindroos On behalf of this University, I confer
the award of graduate diploma upon the graduand presented to me by the
Associate Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education.
It’s my pleasure now to present graduands to the Pro-Chancellor for conferral of the degree of master of this University. For the degree of Master of
Heritage Studies with Distinction Joshua Paul Kalmund For the Degree of Master of International Relations Alex Christopher Anastasios Ahamed Adil Cader
Emily Carita Harrison Andrew Peter McBride Anil Kumar Nayak Catherina Aurelia Angelika Pagani
Vivian Ingrid Pinter Luke Alfred Podolan
For the Degree of Master of International Relations with Distinction Tricia Tinashe Jakwa Joshua Liam Ren Lake For the Degree of Master of Music
Mark Medini Holdsworth
Christopher John Milne For the Degree of Master of Philosophy
Brian Wills-Johnson For the Degree of Master of Strategic Communication
Xin Yi Wee For the Degree of Master of Strategic Communication with Distinction Rhys Daniel Stacker For the Degree of Master of Translation Studies (Chinese)
Yuzhen Ji Jinrong Li Mengke Wang Jiaozhuoran Yao Shuo Zhang AND Yixuan Zhang On behalf of this University, I confer the degree of master upon the graduands presented to me by the Associate Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Arts, Business, Law and Education. My name is Professor Kate Wright and I
am the Dean of the Graduate Research School. It’s my pleasure today to present
graduands to the Pro-Chancellor for conferral of the degree of Doctor of
this University. Pro-Chancellor to qualify for the award of a doctoral
degree of this university, a graduate is required over not less than three years
to complete training at an advanced level, and to pursue research leading to
a thesis that makes a substantial and original contribution to knowledge. The
thesis is examined by three distinguished scholars of international
standing. The examination process subjects the thesis to criticism and
evaluation at the highest level and ensures that a recipient of the degree
has demonstrated the ability to carry out successful research which satisfies
rigorous standards. Pro-Chancellor I now present to you a graduate who has
completed a thesis that has fulfilled the requirements for the award of the
degree of Doctor of Musical Arts of this University. For the degree of Doctor of
Musical Arts and for a thesis entitled French symbolist affinities in the late
work of Toru Takemitsu: An analysis of And then I knew ’twas Wind for flute, viola and harp, I present to you Philip Richard Murray On behalf of this University, I confer
the degree of Doctor upon the graduand presented to me by the Dean of the
Graduate Research School. Pro-Chancellor I now present to you
graduates who have completed theses that have fulfilled the requirements for the
award of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of this university. For the degree Pro-Chancellor, for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and for a thesis
entitled Law is Story: indigeneity and narrative jurisprudence in Australia
after Mabo, I present you Steven Hubert de Haer For a thesis entitled – Norm circles, stigma and the securitization of asylum: A comparative study of Australia and Sweden I present to you Mary Lynn De Silva For a thesis entitled algorithmic
governance and civil society: the impact of big data on order and reflexivity, I
present you Colleen Elisabeth Harmer For a thesis entitled – Inside the outline: Understanding inclusive and exclusive identity in Marapikurrinya (Port Hedland) rock art I present to you, Samantha Nicole Harper For a thesis entitled – Aboriginal occupation traces in agricultural assemblages, Yorke Peninsula/Guuranda, South Australia, I present to you Belinda Gene Liebelt For a thesis entitled hegemonic
negotiation and LGBT representation in contemporary teen films, I present to you
Andrea Pauline MacRae For a thesis entitled in English a study
of 16th century book bindings from the historical Quedlinburg library and their
Lutheran imagery I present to you Christine Porr For a thesis entitled – The ghosts of the gothic in Peter Ackroyd’s literary London, I present to you Ashleigh Jayne Prosser For a thesis entitled – Western [mis]conceptions underplay intrinsic human musicking: A hermeneutic exploration,
I present you Eve Elizabeth Ruddock For a thesis entitled purely of their
own manufacture, the adoption and appropriation of cricket in Samoa circa
1879 to 1939, I present to you Benjamin Sacks For a thesis entitled – International norms and the regulation of innovative warfare: applying lessons from history to
emerging cyber warfare, I present to you Matthew Oliver Sawers For a thesis entitled – The correspondence of Rosendo Salvado to Propaganda Fide (1849-1900): Italian as a language of communication in the 19th century Catholic missionary church,
I present to you Federica Verdina For a thesis entitled – Forms of resistance, I present to you Robert Denish Wood AND For a thesis entitled – Antecedents of the Gothic mode in early modern poetry I present to you, Hong Sheng Colin Yeo. On behalf of this University, I confer
the degree of Doctor upon the graduands presented to me by the Dean of the
Graduate Research School. From time to time the Senate confers
upon an outstanding scholar a higher doctorate of the University and I now
call upon the Vice-Chancellor Professor Dawn Freshwater to present to scholars
for conferral of the degree of Doctor of Letters Pro-Chancellor, the award of a
degree of Doctor of Letters of this University is a prestigious and a rare
honour, recognising a substantial and distinguished contribution to knowledge
through work of which the whole or a substantial part has been published or
accepted for publication. Assessment of the worthiness of the work for the award
of the degree is undertaken by three distinguished scholars of international
standing. The rigorous process of evaluation ensures that the degree is
only awarded to scholars of outstanding merit. Pro-Chancellor Adjunct Professor
Patrick Armstrong presented a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Letters entitled
Ecosystems, Islands and Ideas: Geographical and Interdisciplinary Studies of Humanity’s Relationship with the Environment. Adjunct Professor
Armstrong recalls that when he was about nine or ten, he used to see Gwen Raverat,
an elderly lady who had an artist’s easel mounted on her wheelchair, painting
scenes along the river in Cambridge. She was pointed out, with something akin
to awe, as the granddaughter of Charles Darwin. Since that time, Patrick has had
an interest in the Darwin family and particularly in the life, work and
influence of Charles Darwin. He has visited many of the actual sites that the
Victorian naturalist visited during the voyage of HMS Beagle, 1831 to 1836,
and has undertaken fieldwork, often with photocopies of Darwin’s field notes in
hand, in island groups such as the Falklands, the Azores, the Cocos (Keeling)
Islands, Tahiti, and in several parts of Australia, and New Zealand.
He has located the sites from which Darwin collected fossil, rock, plant and
animal specimens, traced the roots he followed, and thus attempted to
understand how he reacted to a variety of environments, and how they influenced
the development of his ides. He has demonstrated, for example, that the visit
to the Galapagos Islands has probably been greatly overemphasised. It was the
fact that Darwin visited many islands and knew how to compare them that was
the secret of his success. In some instances the visit of the Beagle with
Darwin aboard was the first time or almost the first time in which
systematic scientific observations on some islands were made, and thus
Darwin’s notes provide a baseline for later comparisons. Patrick was therefore
sometimes able to use his visits to demonstrate the extent to which human
activities had transformed even the remotest of islands and island
groups over the subsequent 200 years, providing data with conservation and
resource management implications. Pro-Chancellor, I present to you for
conferral of the degree of Doctor of Letters of this University
Patrick Hamilton Armstrong Pro-Chancellor, Mr Joseph Nolan
presented a thesis for the doctor of a degree of Doctor of Letters entitled the
complete organ works of Charles Marie Joseph Nolan/Signum Records United Kingdom. The works submitted by Mr Nolan for examination were a commercially
released recording of the Organ Symphonies of Charles Marie Widor, recorded in Paris, Lyon and Toulouse, using a new critical edition by Dr John Near. The published critical reaction to these recordings has been unanimous,
worldwide, in its praise in the pursuit of this ideal in recreating historically
informed performances that fully capture Widor’s symphonic sense of scale and arc. The discs have won innumerable five star reviews, and Editor’s Choices in
Gramophone, BBC Music Magazine and Limelight Magazine. Combining these new
critical editions with recordings that utilise the very organs and churches
that Widor would have played, Dr Nolan has sought to use this research to
recreate as closely as is possible, Widor’s historical performance practice to
life on record. These recordings are published by Signum Records UK, winners
of the Gramophone Label of the Year at the 2017 Classical Music Awards, and are
amongst the most praised recordings ever released for organ. They’re also praised
from Gramophone and then on The Australian newspaper. They’ve hailed the
recordings as ‘utterly authoritative’ and MusicWeb International as ‘the best
set available’. Very notably Gramophone awarded the final disc in the cycle a
Critics Choice 2017. The disks have been broadcast worldwide
with BBC Radio 3 Record Review hailing the cycle as ‘magnificent’. A truly
profound set of recordings that will impact the place of the Widor symphonies
in the canon or organ music for generations. Pro-Chancellor, I present to
you for the conferral of the degree of Doctor of Letters of this University,
Joseph Dominic Nolan. On behalf of this University, I confer
the degree of Doctor of Letters upon the graduates have been presented to me by
the Vice-Chancellor. On behalf of this University I confer in
absentia respective awards upon those graduands who were unable to be present
at this Ceremony and whose names are printed in the program, and it’s my habit
to ask you to applaud them even though they aren’t here. Ladies and gentlemen graduates, we now
come to a very important part of the ceremony. The conferring of an honorary
degree which recognises distinguished services by an individual who has made a
significant difference to the community. So it gives me great pleasure to invite
the Vice-Chancellor Professor Freshwater to introduce and present Ms Simone
Young for conferral of the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Music. Pro-Chancellor, Australian-born
Simone Young is internationally recognised as one of the leading
conductors of her generation. She was born in Sydney and claims Irish ancestry
on her father’s side and Croatian ancestry on her mother’s side. Raised in
the Sydney suburb of Balgowlah, she attended Monte Sant’Angelo College in North Sydney. After studying at the New South Wales Conservatorium, she joined the
Australian Opera in 1983 as a répétiteur, playing piano in rehearsals, and
going on to assist conductors Charles McKerras, Richard Bonynge and Stewart
Challender. She conducted her first opera in 1985
and a year later was the youngest person and first female to be appointed as a
resident conductor. In 1986 she was also named young Australian of the Year. In
1987 on an Australia Council grant, Simone went to the Cologne Opera and two
years later was made assistant to James Conlon there. A summer season of Wagner in Beyreuth as a pianist for Daniel Barenboim led to an appointment as his
assistant and resident conductor at the Berlin State Opera in 1993. In 2000
Simone conducted the Sydney Symphony Orchestra’s performance of Elena Kats-Chernin’s Deep Sea Dreaming at the opening ceremony of the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. For a decade until 2015 Simone Young was both artistic director of the
Hamburg State Opera and music director of the city’s Philharmonic Orchestra, a
weighty dual role that we are told is normally
occupied by two people. She presided over a workforce of over 700 and an annual
purse of 97 million dollars, rich’s undreamt of outside all but the
world’s top companies. She conducted repertoire ranging from Mozart. Verdi
Puccini. Wagner, Strauss, Britain and hence she is an acknowledged interpreter of
the operas of Wagner and Strauss, and her 2012 tour to Brisbane with the Hamburg
Opera and Ballet won her the 2013 Helpmann Award for the best individual
classical music performance. Simone’s enjoyed a more than 30 year career
filled with glittering firsts. The 2016-17 season saw her make her BBC
Proms and BBC symphony debuts, as well as returning to the Berlin Staatsoper for
a Tannhauser; Munich for Tristan und Isolde, Fidelio, and Elektra; Vienna Staatsoper for a new production of Prokofiev’s The Gambler, Faust and Parsifal; Frankfurt for Emani; and Carmen in Paris. She also conducted the Stockholm, Helsinki and Dresden Philharmonic Orchestras; Queensland, Sydney and West Australian Symphony Orchestras; at the Grafenegg Festival and returned to the Australian World Orchestra with the Australian National Academy of Music. 2017 also marked the commencement of her appointment as the Principal Guest Conductor of the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra. The current season season sees Simone
return to the Vienna State Opera, to the Zurich Opera and the Royal Swedish
Opera. Equally in demand on the concert podium she appears as a guest with
orchestras in Helsinki, Tokyo, Manchester, Monte Carlo, Bern, and of course Australia.
In 2018 noble debuts will include the LA Philharmonic and the Chicago and Detroit
Symphony Orchestras. She’s conducted the world’s leading orchestras and her
development of musical standards has received praise from the profession, the
public and the media. Simone’s accolades and awards are too
numerous to list, but included among them as you’ve heard there are the Green Room Awards, Helpmann Awards, the Mo Award for Classical Performer of the Year and a nomination for a Grammy Award. In 2004 she was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia. In 2005 she received the prestigious Goethe Institute Medal and in 2011 was awarded the Sir Bernard Heinze Award. Despite being based in Europe and having raised her two daughters, there Simone’s family has
retained its Australian identity. The country has a deep respect and
admiration for its music ambassador, expressed very clearly by Martin Muzacott, writing for The Australian in 2015, “the conductor herself was cheered as she mounted the podium, while the Queensland Symphony Orchestra looked like it couldn’t wait to get stuck in. And that’s pretty much how it stayed all night, the orchestra playing out of its skin for a conductor it clearly adores.
Pro-Chancellor in recognition of her contribution at an international level
to classical music and music education, it is my privilege to present to you for
the conferral of the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Music, Simone Young. On behalf of this University I confer
the Honorary degree of Doctor of Music upon Simone Margaret Young. I’m all out of breath. I now invite the
Warden of Convocation, Dr Doug McGhie to welcome today’s new graduates. Fellow graduates, as the Warden of
Convocation of the University, I congratulate you on your graduation. We
have graduates new first-time and others who are receiving latter degrees, and
it’s fantastic to see as graduates you join the diverse and incredibly talented
alumni of this University. Because of UWA’s unique structure and supporting
legislation, you also automatically join Convocation, the representative body of
the graduates, as lifelong members. As members of Convocation you now have the
right and privilege to share in and contribute to the intellectual and
cultural life of the University, and to stand for election to the Council of Convocation, and for the two places on Senate elected by members of convocation. As members of Convocation you join over 150,000 graduates who have successfully
completed their studies at UWA over the past 100 years. The friendships you have
developed as a student at UWA are fostered within Convocation to support
valued lifelong networks. Convocation’s members range from young to older and
all are welcome, valued and supported. As time passes after graduation, you’ll
enjoy seeing and hearing the stories of success of your fellow students and
tonight we’ve been graced with a wonderful inspiring story of a wonderful
inspiring person and I welcome you to Convocation, Simone. Convocation is
extremely proud to be able to promote the wonderful achievements of our
members and looks forward to telling your story. I welcome you as a new or
return member and encourage you to continue the relationship with the
University which began when you chose to study here. and continues as a member of
Convocation. Congratulations and best wishes. Today we are primarily celebrating the
achievements of our students. It is appropriate therefore that a student
voice should be heard to mark the significant occasion. I’m very pleased to
invite Miss Kate Milligan who graduated today with a Bachelor of Arts with a
Major in Music Studies to give a valedictory address on behalf of all
today’s graduates. Pro-Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, members
of the Senate, distinguished guests, members of staff, graduates and their
guests. I’m indescribably thankful for the opportunity to speak on behalf of my
fellow graduating students this evening. Graduates, it is my hope for the next few
minutes that I might capture and express some of your thoughts and emotions. This
evening as we reflect on our studies together however, I would like to first
extend a very warm and heartfelt congratulations of you. This evening is a
testament to the strength of your commitment to knowledge and learning.
Each of you will have faced a unique series of challenges throughout your
studies and it is a hugely admirable thing to have persevered with all of
your hard work, now represented by the very special piece of paper in your
hands. Occasions like these where the brightest minds are gathered together in
such numbers are few and far between. It is amazing to think about what each of
you will achieve in the future as individuals, let alone what we could all
together as a collective. We wield an extraordinary amount of influence. We are
the driving force that will propel our society into the future and we will
define what that future looks like. It is because of this that our graduation
tonight is symbolic of an obligation we all bear as we continue on our
respective paths. A tertiary education is a great privilege, one that is not
available to everybody. We must ask ourselves how best to apply the skills
that UWA has given us, and how we can raise up the less fortunate so that
eventually they may be awarded the same opportunities and privileges. The
question then follows how best to go about this.
As students of the arts and humanities I believe that each of us understands what
it means to act compassionately. It is my opinion that the Arts shed light on what
it means to be fundamentally human and that the best art always reflects a
degree of analytical thought or even criticism to do with the world around us.
In this way great art can be some of the most useful tools in acts of compassion
this is exemplified in the work of Yehudi Menuhin, the great 20th century
violinist educator and peace advocate. Menuhin was the first Jewish
musician to return to Germany after World War one in the Holocaust playing
several concerto concerts with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra in 1947, as
an act of reconciliation to Jewish critics. He said that the aim was to
rehabilitate Germany’s music and spirit. This was just one of Menuhin’s
extraordinary acts of compassion in the life of many. As much of his career was
spent in education, I thought he’d be an apt example to use on a night that
celebrates just that. On the relationship between compassion and education, Menuhin
offered the following words of wisdom, “Why is compassion not part of our
established curriculum, an inherent part of our education compassion, or wonder,
curiosity, exultation, and humility. These are the very foundation of any real
civilization. No longer the prerogatives or the preserves of any one church but
belonging to everybody, in each every child, in every home and in every school. Graduates, I hope you will agree with me
when I say that our tertiary education has allowed us to come to appreciate
compassion, awe, wonder exultation and humility, as they manifest around us.
Furthermore our studies have taught us to apply logic and analysis to these
concepts so that we may optimize our own usefulness and our own social mobility. So all of this having been said we can
only ask how exactly to move forward.. My advice would be to constantly critique
the world around you, ask what could be better and how you can make change
happen. Do not be afraid to challenge the status quo, put your findings into music,
poetry, visual art and perhaps even a thesis every now and again. Use the
skills that have been instilled in you for as much good as you can possibly
fathom. Inject compassion into your day-to-day living as well as into your
larger scale projects and you will be rewarded, respected and most importantly
you will inspire others. So a huge congratulations once again. I look
forward to marvelling at all of your future achievements that will no doubt
change the world. Thank you very much. Ladies ladies and gentlemen. thank you for your
participation in tonight’s proceedings which has made it very memorable for all
the graduates. I specially wish to thank Dr Simone Young for giving the
graduation address and Kate Milligan for her valedictory address. Both speakers
have enriched these proceedings with their perspectives. To all the new
graduates I offer my warmest congratulations. As UWA graduates your
achievements will enhance the reputation of this university and we hope you’ll
keep in touch with us over the coming years to let us know what you’re doing,
and that you’ll retain a lifelong connection as a part of the University
community. The ceremony is now concluded and I invite you to join us on Whtifeld
Court for light refreshments. Members of the audience are asked to rise and
remain standing in their places until the procession including the new
graduates has left the hall. I thank you.