Using Problem Based Learning with Math Lessons

Using Problem Based Learning with Math Lessons

January 29, 2020 0 By Stanley Isaacs


♪[theme music] While you wait for me, look at the
center box where you have your topic. Remember I always leave off part of the
title of the topic because you are trying to figure out the lesson through your…
-problem Problem. Good job Jayden Through the…
-problem [class in unison] So look at the-look at the middle box.
Make sure your PBL is in front of you. So problem based learning is basically
switching the teaching around. So you are no longer doing direct instruction
where you’re just teaching everything um as the teacher. So for problem based learning I developed a
graphic organizer that looks a lot like the GATE template. It has the-the box in the
center where I pose the topic. But then I only do part of the title because
often times in the curriculum the title already is telling them what
the lesson is going to be. In problem based learning you want
them to get there on their own. OK, topic 4 dash 4 blank.
Read the rest with me. Two digit numbers.
[class reads with teacher] We’re going to do something
with two digit numbers. Okay, let’s go to the problem
box on your PBL sheet. Add…
-46 + [class in unison] 26. Explain how you solved the…
-problem [class in unison] And last part. Show your…
-work [class in unison] Very good. What do we use to… better understand your problem? Raise your hand. Dominic, what should we use?
-cubes Use cubes. So go in
your orange folder… find your CUBE sheet.
Mine’s up here. CUBES is like close reading. We use CUBES.
it’s a strategy to help us.. [students shout out
various answers] Better…
-understanding [class in unison] to understand better. Good. To have a better
understanding. So let’s look at our… Then we start with the first box which
is the problem box. And that’s where I have the problem typed. And I have that
there so that when we use the CUBE strategy they are able to write on the problem. They’re
doing all the steps. They’re circling, boxing, you’re able to
see their annotations. So after we break up the problem with
CUBES, we move to the independent box where now the students have an idea
of what operation or how-or how they’re going to
solve the problem. Think about your strategy. Write
what you’re going to use. So you’re not solving yet you’re
just writing your strategy on top. The first step is just you getting your
minds going because the real work is going to be when you talk to your partner.
Right? So I’m gonna let you work for two minutes
by yourself. Independent is voice level… -Zero
Zero. Two minutes to solve this problem. Go. In this step as the teacher I’m not
expecting them to get it right. I mean I hope that they would, but for me
my expectancy is for them to get their mind going, to be able to choose a strategy, and
to be able to explain why they chose that. So you’re going to keep looking in the
independent because now when you talk to your partner, and you have that discussion
piece using your math talk sentence frames, you’re explaining your…
-work [class in unison] Work. You’re doing the
show your work part. You show-you should have showed it so now
not only are you going to tell your partner what you used, what
strategy, but explain it. In the partner box they first discussed
with their partner using their math talk sentence frames what they did. I used-I used cubes because
it’s an easy strategy to use… by putting tens
and ones together. Eventually will lead into where they’re
discussing and solving on their own. So I set the timer, let them talk for about
a minute and decide within each other if uh what strategy the want to
use, if they want to keep theirs, but they have to
pick one together. During that time, during the partner time,
I’m walking around and I’m picking those students who are going to help lead the
class to that lesson. So they’re going to be the models. They’re going
to be the teachers. So Mercedes and Aiden, you want to
show us your strategy? Last one. And this is going to lead to our lesson.
We are going to do more of this today. And it goes with the place
value blocks. Ready? Okay. Let’s give
them our attention. So now they think it’s time for them to
show off their answers. Where as again, you as the teacher, know where the lesson is
going. So now you have chosen two to three groups who come up and explain and
the whole class is listening. So this should look familiar. She just did
a chart, she just said your splitting it into what Mercedes? Tens and…
-ones What is this look like? Our math problem we used…. today. Right? So you split up your ones and your tens.
Now I’m going to be quiet, it’s hard for me, so Mercedes and Aiden,
you got to jump in. Go. And then once you get the students up there
and they lead the direction you want, that’s the strategy you
choose as a whole class. You are now-you’re taking over as the
teacher, but they still don’t know that. The students are thinking that
they’re still leading it. Turn to the-your paper to the whole class
and we’re going to use two strategies. We’re going to use the place
value blocks to model and then we’re going to add using
place value with regrouping. Let’s draw each group first.
Ready? Let’s do 46. How many
tens in my 4-46? -4
-4 On the next side of this-right
here, draw a line down the middle. We’re going to write 46
and on the bottom of that 26. And we’re going to
follow Mercede’s… example the way she did the-the- it’s
called a T Chart, kind of making a T… In math I think it’s very important to have
students think in a way where there’s not just one way to do a problem anymore. And
that’s why PBL, problem based learning, works very good with Common Core because like
just this lesson, I had the problem solved um three or four different ways
and they got the same answer. ♪[theme music]