University of Minnesota Board of Regents – Mission Fulfillment Committee

University of Minnesota Board of Regents – Mission Fulfillment Committee

October 16, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


(gavel bangs) – Good morning. Welcome to I guess we had
a short meeting in July, but this school year’s first
Mission Fulfillment Committee. Those of you in the audience,
I’m Regent Anderson, I guess you’re stuck with
me leading this committee. We used to start
at eight o’clock, but then we got Regent
Kenyanya on the Board, (committee laughter) we are starting, we’re gonna- ya know seems like I’ve
been up all day already. (laughter) Welcome I’m glad
everybody’s here. I’m gonna start by welcoming
our student representatives to the Board of Regents
thanks for all of you, for taking on that
duty this year, and at each meeting we have
two of the representatives sit around the horseshoe. Very briefly I’m gonna ask
student Representative Basarich from Duluth, and Representative
King from Morris. In about 30 seconds or less, representative would you
tell us your history. (laughing)
– Thank you Chair Anderson, So I am a senior at the
University of Minnesota Duluth, I’m a non-traditional student so I started out at Lake
Superior College in Duluth, but I’m originally
from Rochester, and I’ve start
out as engineering and now I’m political science, so it’s quite an
interesting trajectory, and just looking to
really do all I can to represent the students. – [Anderson] Thank you,
representative King? – Thank you Chair Anderson, my name is Brandon
King, I’m a second year, I’m also a
non-traditional student. I originally was teaching
TaeKwonDo at a daycare and then decided to
come back to school. I am going for psychology,
sociology, and human services, so I have a lot on my plate, but I’m excited to
see what I can do for the students here. – Well welcome and thank you
for joining us here today. Again the Mission
Fulfillment Committee, I’m somewhat new to the, well I’m real new to
the leadership of it and somewhat new
to the committee although all 12 of us had
worked the last two years together on it. I do work closely
in this committee with Provost Hanson
and her team, and the President’s office to develop the work
plan for the docket and my vice-chair in this
endeavor is Regent Davenport, and at this time, I’m
gonna ask Regent Davenport to bring us through what we’re gonna be
doing for the year. – All right, thank you Chair Anderson. Hopefully you’ve
reviewed the work plan that we have in the packet, and what I’d like to do
is just draw our attention to the close alignment between
this committee’s work plan and the Board priorities as
identified at the July retreat, and along with some of the
underlying conversations that we had there. So for example, today’s agenda addresses
program excellence, student financial education,
and our outreach mission. And we have like many
of the other committees, a number of annual reports, and in addition to that, the work plan supports
reviewing enrollment strategies through agenda items
related to transfer, post-secondary
enrollment options, core general education
and pipelines as well as online education. The work plan looks
at the dynamics between our
University’s graduates and their success, and
contributions to employers and to the workplace. The work plan includes a
look at University rankings and congratulations to Crookston on the announcements
that came out in the US Report today,
News and World Report, rankings, and we also will be
looking at faculty retention again as we continue to build
upon our existing excellence. And one last example, while better understanding
our opportunities related to diversity
and inclusion, the plan includes a closer look at campus climate, not just
on the Twin Cities campus, but throughout our
system, thank you. – Thank you
Vice-Chair Davenport. And as you gave that report, I’ve looked round the table, and I think we have
11 Regents here, we have good attendance and I believe we have Regent
McMillan on the phone, is that correct Regent McMillan? – [Regent McMillan] Chair
Anderson you are correct and delighted to
be participating, although sorry I’m
doing it by phone. – All right if you
have anything to say, just speak up, otherwise
sit back, listen, and enjoy the show.
(Regents laughing) – [Regent McMillan]
All right thank you. – So today we do
have a busy schedule, mostly information. We’re gonna take these items, have a, information session on them and then they’ll
be time for Regents to ask questions. Our first item is gonna
be our annual report on academic program changes, and those that are
presenting could step to the table at this time, I know it’ll be Provost Hanson, Professor Griffin,
Professor Knight, and Professor Whitney. And Provost Hanson
when you are ready, we are ready for you. – Thank you Chair Anderson, and members of the Board. Every meeting we bring
academic program changes for the consent agenda. Today accompanied by there
members of our faculty, I wanna talk about
what lies behind these agenda items. What happens before we
bring the consent agenda. The process we follow
when creating, changing, and discontinuing the
academic programs. First I’ll provide a short
review of this process, then the required annual summary of new and changed programs, and then we’ll hear
from our faculty, who will provide examples of
the program development process at the faculty and
department levels. Our administrative
policy says this: Departments, colleges and campuses have the
authority to establish, change, and discontinue academic
plans and sub-plans that may appear on official
University transcripts, subject to appropriate
consultation with other units and subject
to the final authority of the Board of Regents. For the Board to
feel comfortable in exercising that authority, through approval of
the consent agenda, you undoubtedly want to know that the academic program
proposals listed there have been through a
process at the department, college, and campus level that’s intellectually
sound and academically and administratively rigorous. Regental approval takes place
at the end of the process and it’s required whenever
new programs are proposed and when programs are
changed significantly or discontinued. Again, all of these
changes and modifications or deletions come to you
in the consent report. Near the end of today’s meeting, Regent Anderson will invite
you to vote to approve this meeting’s consent report. What we’re doing right now is conveying a bit
about what always lies behind those reports. To set the approval process
in the appropriate context, it might be helpful to remember what actually comprises
a degree program. Degrees are of course
made up of courses. Courses are also
the building blocks of particular academic programs. Consider, that’s what the mortar
board is showing. Consider for example the 120
credit undergraduate degree on the Twin Cities Campus, this weird mortar board illustrates the
typeS of credits, or courses a student
is expected to complete for a degree. You see there collegiate
requirements, those are courses or credits that all students
in a particular college are expected to take, regardless of their
major or degree program, and those can vary from
college to college. I mean one example might be
the second language requirement in the college of liberal arts, and other colleges don’t
have that requirement, but everyone who graduates from the college of
liberal arts has that. Sometimes there
are prerequisites to get into a college and those may again differ
from college to college. Liberal education,
or general education, as most people call it, the courses are meant to provide
some disciplinary breadth and a basic level of mastery of some important skills, for example writing. All undergraduate students
on the Twin Cities Campus are expected to fulfill
these requirements, regardless of college
or degree program. These credits very often overlap with other categories
of credits, such as program requirements, and that is students
can use some courses to so-called double dip, they double count the courses, not in terms of credits,
but in terms of areas. Program requirements
are what most of us call a student’s major or minor. And these are
courses and credits in the official program of study that makes a BA in Math or a
BA in Philosophy, it’s different courses for the different majors. Elective credits, the blue
band there in the middle that we skipped over, are the additional
credits or courses that supplement a student’s
major or degree program. They are free choice
credits as the name implies. So as students progress through
120 credit degree program, and all University of Minnesota undergraduate degrees can
be completed in 120 credits, and that was an effort
to make that the case, they make their way through a carefully thought
out configuration of courses. The work faculty do
to ensure the rigor and relevance of
these curricula, coupled with the choice that students make to
personalize their experiences create academically responsible and intellectually
stimulating degree programs. Now the heights on those bands on the mortar board can vary depending upon the
particular program or degree, different
degree programs are configured differently, even if all have
these same components the proportion of types
of credits varies. This means that there’s
a significant amount of variability and
the flexibility that students have in
their degree programs. For example, English
majors may have a good deal of room to explore courses and direct some of
their own study, whereas engineering students
have more prescribed routes through their majors because of their
accreditation requirements in the field. It’s also worth noting that a given course
might be used differently by different
students or programs. For example what’s collegiate
requirement to many students, might be an elective
to some others, or an element of the
major to yet others. Sometimes a course
is made available only to students in
a particular major, while other courses
are designed to attract and serve a wide
range of participants. We’ll hear more in a
bit from our faculty who are here today
about how courses can be used in different ways. As I hope you know,
we strive to follow an approval process
that balances agility and oversight of
academic quality. We want new programs and
all curricular changes to be thoroughly vetted, but we also want
departments and colleges to move through the process
with ease and alacrity. First we need to ensure
alignment with mission, we don’t want the business
school teaching French, and the French department
shouldn’t be teaching marketing. Beyond that, proposed
programs are evaluated in terms of some
common criteria, including quality, demand,
comparative advantage, adequacy, and efficient
use of resources. We aim to support the
process of course development and change to ensure
appropriate consultation and to proceed in
a timely fashion, even as proposals must
go through various stages of review before
formal initiation. We don’t bring proposals
to this committee without these steps of
consultation and review across the campus
and the University. We’re concerned
with mission fit, effective use of resources, and alignment with
the priorities of the University of Minnesota. Both qualitative and
quantitative data are gathered including data from students
and the broader community as well as from faculty, in order to inform decisions about the creation
and discontinuation
of academic programs. The exact process is
detailed in your docket so I won’t go into great detail, but as you know it begins
with faculty proposals, and then program
changes are routed through the various
stages of consultation. The process is
collaborative and iterative with different parts of the
process examining the proposal for different things. Faculty given their
content expertise in their academic disciplines, are the generators
of the new programs, based on their knowledge
of developments in their academic fields, regional and national
workforce needs, and student demands for
certain types of knowledge and credentialing, faculty
propose new sub-plans, minors, certificates, and
academic degree programs. Faculty are in fact involved
throughout these various stages of the process. Proposals are
reviewed, redrafted, and resubmitted in
accordance with feedback from home departments as well as collegiate
curriculum committees, and then programs
are open tor review and feedback by peers
across the institution. Staff from the colleges
as well as staff in the Office of
Undergraduate Education, the Graduate School, and
the Office of the Provost, work with faculty and
collegiate leadership to make sure that all policies and processes are accounted for as programs find their
way to the consent agenda for your consideration. So that’s a reminder
of the process. Now for the mandatory
summary report that is required
at this meeting, the programs added in 2019 include degrees such as a BS and a BA in Environmental
Geosciences from CSE on the Twin Cities Campus, which we’ll hear
more about soon, as well as an MS in Mathematics on the Duluth Campus and a
BA in English Communication at the Crookston
Campus, among others. The exact numbers of additions and deletions are
in front of you now, there were also new sub-plans within already
existing programs, along with new
undergraduate minors and medical school fellowships. Two undergraduate and
four graduate programs were discontinued, along
with a few graduate and undergraduate minors. With the changes
of the past year, these are the total numbers
of University of Minnesota academic programs. These numbers have remained
relatively consistent over the past few years, with most numbers
changing only slightly. You can see in red how
the numbers compare to five years ago. As we’ve mentioned
at this presentation throughout the years, the creation of a new program does not necessarily
translate into new costs, nor does the
discontinuation of programs directly translate into
the saving of resources. This is a constant
refrain of ours, I know you’ve heard
us say it before, but it just means that faculty
are deployed differently or they have
developed new course, revised syllabi,
dropped old courses. To convey more about how we
hand these responsibilities for degree oversight and
responsibility for refreshing and reviewing the curriculum, I’ve asked three faculty members from programs in three
colleges to join me. I’ve chosen folks from
these programs in part because they all have
responsibilities for curriculum bearing on
environmental studies. Part of the subtext here, and the reason that I
asked these folks to come is that these programs,
I wanna sort of show that these programs
are not duplicative, even though they
all have something about the environment in them. These faculty are all
experts in their fields, and they can make
more concrete than I, the intentionality
and interconnectivity of the curricular and
program development processes in an area of the curriculum studies bearing on
environmental issues. Where it might at first
glance seem the University has duplication. So, you have Professor
Donna Whitney from the Department of Earth
and Environmental Sciences from the college of
Science and Engineering, Professor Daniel Griffin,
Department of Geography, Environment and Society, the College of Liberal Arts, and Professor Joseph Knight, Department of Forest Resources, College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Resource Sciences, thank you for being here, and I will turn it over to you. – Thank you, Chair Anderson, members of the Board, we
appreciate the invitation this morning to come
and talk with you about our programs. As you just heard we represent three environmental programs
from different colleges, CSE, CFANS, and CLA in order
from your right to left. These programs
have distinct ways of approaching environmental
areas of study, all are grounded in
science primarily, but serve different
populations of students who have different career goals. The Environmental
Geoscience major in CSE prepares students for careers
in the opportunity rich environmental geoscience area. The ESPM program
that I represent focuses on science in addition to
issues surrounding
environmental education although not
teacher preparation, policy issues, and natural
resource management. And CLA CLA programs focus
on the integration of humanities and science
and the biology, society, and environment
major in particular had its origins as
CLA’s biology program but has expanded in scope to focus on contemporary
environmental perspectives in science. So in the following
three slides, we’re going to address
three topics for you and those are how
our degree programs connect with and leverage the
strengths of other programs, how we are attentive
to our fields, our respective
fields of interest and how we maintain the quality and appropriateness
of our degree programs and we have divided
up responsibility for those three areas
as you’ll see pairs in this will address each. – Chair Anderson,
members of the Board, to dive into the topic, doing this right. Thank you, for how we
have these three programs that complement each other without too much overlap, we would start by
just talking about how environmental studies is such an inherently
interdisciplinary topic and the complexity and severity of environmental
challenges facing us all really requires
a broad approach. We use this term
all hands on deck that we really need
to be studying this from many different
perspectives, there’s no one
department or program that can adequately cover this. We need scientists
and engineers, we need people studying
policy and management, we need humanities,
we need business, we need medicine, you know there’s pretty
much environmental studies touch many aspects
of the University and so over time, there
have been programs developed to prepare our students and to explore very exciting
aspects of scholarship related to
environmental studies. So the University of
Minnesota’s developed a very broad approach, and I think this makes
us a center of excellence in environmental studies, and there are many examples
in which our departments and programs have
connected with each other and with other system campuses as we’ll talk about through the topic of
environmental studies, there’s Grand
Challenges Program, there’s the Institute
on the Environment, there’s certain
aspects of Minn Drive, as well as our curricula. So at least from my perspective and I think my
colleagues as well, this has been a very
effective approach, and it has led to great
success for our students, we’re very focused on
preparing our students for careers and making sure that we’re preparing
them adequately for a wide range
of career paths, grounded in
environmental studies. – [Anderson] Thank you. – Chair Anderson and
members of the Board, hello good morning, my name’s Dan Griffin, it’s a privilege to be here. And so as you just heard
these degree programs offered through our departments and the different colleges
in which they’re found are distinct but complementary. And so for example I would
speak to the programs in my own department in
the Geography Program where we have
environmental themes in our geography degrees as well as this
biology, society, and environment degree that
you’ve just heard about. Students matriculating
through our degree programs have the opportunity
to be rather flexible in terms of the
particular coursework that they select, if we think back to the
slide we saw a moment ago with the different buckets
that need to be filled. While at the same time
in our establishment of the curriculum and as we are constantly
reconsidering the program tracks and the recommendations
that we give to the students with flexibility, we’re
thinking about ensuring that they have skills, skills that will prepare
them for the workforce and ensure that they’re
really prepared for career readiness. And I know for example
with the students that I interact with and advise, I try to guide them towards
following their interests but also ensuring when
they finish the program that they’ll have an opportunity
to follow multiple paths because it’s quite clear to me, even from my own time as
an undeclared freshman without a major that
students don’t always know at the first year what
they’re gonna get to or where they’re gonna end up when they finish their
time at the University. So our degrees are
robust and flexible and one of the
things in geography that we insist that
our students do is actually take
coursework across campus. And so beyond the CLA
and in fact into CSC, into CFANS, and
so in particular, I’ve been directing
students recently to pursue a sequence of
coursework in statistics because I believe that some
familiarity with statistics and if possible if they
could even do a sequence will prepare them for
higher ability, frankly. And another example would
be with programming. And so I think
things have changed and kids today are
starting to work on coding and programming at an early age and if they’ve not
yet gotten to that by the time they get to college, it’s not too late. And so I’ve directed
students that I work with to pursue expertise and programming with the
contemporary languages like Python and JavaScript and things that are
fairly straightforward and achievable but
also highly marketable to the workforce,
right out of college, right out of the
undergraduate degree. And also make them more
appealing as applicants to graduate school, which we know many
of our undergraduates go on to receive, or
some graduate degrees. I’d also like to highlight
a particular growth sector that our department
funnels into the workforce and that’s the Geographic
Information Science, and so GIS we call,
it’s basically mapping plus computers plus expert input and decision support. And so this is a pretty
substantial growth sector over the last few decades and we have a pretty
deep bench in geography of faculty that
specialize in GIS, but we do not cover
the full gamut of geospatial applications, so for example we
often send our students to take coursework
with Professor Knight who specializes in remote
sensing of natural systems and so this is satellite and
aerial based perspectives. And so long story short
we are making sure that our students
are well grounded in our own degree programs, but also that they’re versed and are in kind of
constant contact and working on
teams with students from across the University, and we believe that
exposure to the hardships of teamwork makes them better
prepared for the workforce. – [Professor Whitney]
Another way that our degree programs connect with and leverage the strength
of other degree programs is through collaborations
with the other campuses of the University
of Minnesota system, and just from my own department in Earth and
Environmental Sciences, we have very
extensive connections with the department of the same
name at Duluth for example, we have for example,
we all study lakes, they study big lakes,
we study little lakes, it works out. There’s lots of collaboration also involving students
that Duluth faculty are on our graduate faculty so
they co-advise students, they serve on our committees,
we visit them as well and in many cases Duluth
students will come and spend a semester or more
in our department in particular for PHD students. And so it’s a very rich
collaboration I believe, on all levels through the
curriculum and also involving many aspects of scholarship. – [Professor Knight] So the, forgive me the mic is a little, it’s not behaving. So the environment is at
once a very broad field encompassing things
like climate change and water resources, and
land use, and wildlife even. It’s broad and also rapidly
developing so things are constantly changing in
this broad area of study that we work within. New methods are developed,
new data sets are produced, new collaborations happen
and so it’s a very rich area of both research
and teaching. So we have to keep our
fingers on the pulse of this field, so to speak. So we’re always
updating our curricula and our programs to
account for these changes and these changes are
identified through networks of collaborators and integrating with scientists
and reading and studying. So we feel like we have a
very solid understanding of these fields and
can respond to that and make the curricula as
robust as possible to help the students work
in these areas. So in another way
our stakeholders,
the people that we do research for and work with
and our collaborators are often the ultimate
employers of our students. So we might receive a project
funded by the Minnesota Department of Natural
Resources and have close relationships with
people at the DNR. And then ultimately some of
the students that we graduate could work for DNR which is
one example of many possible where there’s a direct
relationship between
the people that we collaborate with and
the ultimate employers of our students. – [Professor Griffin]
So in our conversations in preparing for this meeting, we discussed about how
our various departments and the advisors in our
departments work with employment data for both
a state and national level to try to maintain our
finger on the pulse, and where the opportunities are and how students
can move forward. So there’s a footnote here
with some of the examples of the data sets that we use. I’d also, to turn back to the geographic information
science example, I’d highlight an anecdote from
our Master’s in GIS Program orientation, just from
a couple of weeks ago, so this is one of the
nation’s longest professional master’s degrees in GI science and it’s been quiet productive
and the placement rate is phenomenal, and the recruitment
rate is really strong. And so one of the things that
my colleague, Mark Linburg, who’s on that faculty
highlighted was that over this multi-decadal
history of GIS, the game has changed a
bit, for a long time, it was such that
students could come in and learn how to drive
this complicated software, and then go out and
get jobs and in fact, roll those jobs into
lifelong carriers. And that’s certainly
still the case, this software is complicated but it’s becoming more
intuitive and they then prove the usability and it now
doesn’t necessarily take a master’s degree to
just drive the software. And so the opportunities
have shifted away from that and have moved into what
really requires a broader perspective, such that students
can have a more holistic understanding that’s needed
for planning and directing projects to go on an
informed decision support. Of course GIS is really at
the vanguard of wrangling with big data and managing big
data sets, and so students have to learn how
to deal with that, and along the way, now
students really have to become somewhat expert with
coding and Python, as a language that’s been
really common for that. Another point I guess
I would just echo what Professor Knight’s just
said, is that the longevity of this particular program
has produced graduates that are now in middle
and upper management, cross-sectors in government,
municipal, state, federal, and then also in the private
sector and the non-profit sectors as well. And so graduates of our
program are effectively now embedded in the workforce
and this ensures, ya know we’re in communication
with them and these also establish really critical
pipelines for placing the next generation of students. And then finally in
our own department we’ve been fortunate enough
to have the opportunity to hire a few new faculty in
GIS over the last few years. And we’ve been particularly
attentive to trying to understand where, what’s
the real bleeding edge of this technology and what
problems need to be solved, and where can we
find the best talent, and let’s get those people in
to train the next generation. So we’ve been really strategic
with regard to hiring and identifying faculty
that are best suited to preparing the next generation. – [Professor Knight] So in
CFANS our career and internship services group
collects extensive data through surveys
of our graduates. They ask questions
about, what is your job? Is the job related to the
program that you studied while you were here? How satisfied are you
with that position? What is the salary? All of that data is
available to anyone on that. We frequently use it when we
talk with perspective parents, perspective student’s
parents, rather. So we can show them the data
on how satisfied our graduates are with the programs
that they have completed. We also use it of course for development of our
academic programs. So if we find for example,
that a particular area is identified as a growth area, we have a lot of people that
end up in positions like that, we can strengthen those areas. Or the reverse would be,
if we find that a program is not meeting the needs of
the employers or the students we can cut that. In an example of that in
ESPM a couple of years ago, we removed one of our areas
of emphasis from the major in response to those concerns. We’ve identified a concern
that we weren’t meeting the needs of the students
and so we cut that track and focused our
efforts in other areas. And then we’re always
updating things, as I said, the environment
is moving very quickly. Not only the methods
the researchers use but the tools, the people
who work in that area need to use change frequently. Dan, mentioned statistics
in programming, we think those are
very important and
we’re always adding emphasis areas to better
equip our students to succeed in these careers. – [Professor Whitney]
I’ll combine the last two points on this slide
with an example from the Department of Earth and
Environmental Sciences. We just added a new program
with your approval last year in Environmental Geoscience. And the reason we did this, we had a track for students
to take and formally a list of courses
they could take in Environmental Geoscience
and we also had a minor but through talking
to our advisory board and talking to employers, and
with a change in our faculty, of more emphasis in scholarship
on environmental sciences. We just felt that we weren’t
adequately preparing our students for a direct
path to careers. That they were getting a
very great education with Earth Science Degree but
there were other courses that were kind of electives
for that degree, that we felt should be
required for students who wanted a particular career path. And so the Environmental
Geoscience majors, don’t add as Provost Hanson
said, cost in a sense there. A redistribution of our
focus in a way that students take particular courses and
have particular experiences, and we can do a better
job of making sure that when they graduate, that they
have what they need to go into the opportunity rich fields of Environmental Geosciences. So we get a lot of feedback
from external sources, from employers from our field, and we spend a lot of time
crafting this plan before we went ahead and proposed
it and got valuable feedback from our colleagues in
other programs as well as at the college, and Provost’s
office before it came to you. So we’re just starting it this
fall and there’s been a huge interest in it already and
we’re very optimistic that this will be a great
thing for our students, so we thank you
for your approval. That’s the end of
our presentation but we’re happy
to take questions. – Terrific, thank you
very much, appreciate it and ya know one of the things
we’re trying to do here is show we have
environmental sciences in all these colleges, how they are somewhat
different but yet you work somewhat together to make
sure our students can get all the need they have. Part of being the
Chairman is you get to ask your questions first
before we run out of time and I did have a
couple questions. I heard Professor Knight,
mention ya know the differences you people do, yet he said
something to the opinion, or something to the point that
“We don’t do teacher prep.” So I’m guessing, for
high school teachers and teachers of
Environmental Science. My question is, do we in
the college of education even development, do we also
have environmental people or do teachers that
come out of there with, that need those classes take
them from your colleges? – I’m not aware of a
specific environment focused teaching program in CEHD. What I meant by that
comment was that, we would provide the
environmental expertise, and then if the student
desired to become a teacher, they would get the
teaching expertise in a different program. – Terrific, okay that’s
kinda what I was thinking. And the other thing, I
heard both Professor Whitney and Professor Griffin, talk
a little to this point. Professor Whitney on
her last deal with Environmental Geosciences,
to understand, where we’re going in the
future and talking on having the right programs. And Professor Griffin,
talked about GIS and it made me think
of driverless cars, you know today with
mapping the highways and things like that. And so, and there was also
a comment of we need to have our finger on the
pulse of where we’re going in the future, and my question is; so we go and we think of
GIS, back when I was probably a scholar or little before,
we’d never heard of it. It was, ya know, in
the Space Program, and it was something
that was way out there. Now it’s here, so how do we, in looking to what we’re
gonna offer as degrees or what we’re gonna teach, how do we have our
finger on the pulse from, way out there, from never
hear of, way out there, to it’s here, how do we
stay above that curve or ahead of that curve so that
we can get those students in? Does anybody have
an answer on that? – So I can take a stab at it. So I remember as a college
student when I took my first GIS class, McDonald’s
was used as an example, apparently McDonald’s
was an early – Doctor? – use, you know they were
really cautious about where they cited their
franchise locations. So that’s an assimilation
of geographic data, of population data, of
traffic data, visibility, all these kinds of things
that are still relevant today. Indeed things have come
a long way and in fact, I am a little worried about
the driverless car situation personally cause I don’t
know that much about it. But I don’t want a computer deciding who crashes
harder in person. That’s just, maybe
what I am concerned. I will say that one of my newer
colleagues in our department Eric Shook, is really
a computer scientist and he specializes in what
he calls computational GIS, and so this is really
maximizing the computational efficiency of GIS processing. And so by, again the details
are a little bit lost on me but by taking these
computations and organizing them for parallel process, you can
distribute the work across multiple computer cores and
it’s faster and more efficient. And so, since he’s arrived,
he’s begun to offer classes in what he
calls cyber GIS. And so, a few of the students
that I work closely with have taken those
classes and it’s, one of the things that’s
nice from that coursework is they have hand
on work with Python. Ya know that’s the
language that he works in and whether they go on to
employ his particular approach, they’ll have had to
problem solve with Python. In my own research lab, I would- pardon me, in my own research lab
I would just mention that we’re tying to also, I’m trying to bring
together students, not just from my
college and department but I am also working
with students from Engineering, Computer
Engineering and we’re trying to bring some artificial
intelligence to bear on the work that I do. And so by bringing
these teams together, you kind of broaden perspectives
and give kids a real shot at problem solving. – And I think we just
want to make sure that we, like you said, keep our finger
on the pulse so we’re ahead of the curve and so we
can get these students. Anything to add?
– If I could add. Just one point very quickly, I’d like to add that in many
cases the pipeline of those new methods that are
used in corporate world, such as the companies
that are working, the many companies that are
working on driverless cars, starts at universities. So the processing that’s
done in some cases for driverless cars relies
on a technique called a neural network. There are people in the
Computer Science Department, here today, working
on those things. So I think we have, we’re not only monitoring
what’s going on, we’re involved faculty in
general in the very early stages of development
of those techniques. – My colleagues, do I have
questions from my colleagues? Regent Hsu. – Thank you Mr. Chair,
thank you presenters. My question is, it sounds like you’re
collecting a lot of data about your programs and I was
just wondering if you could share with us the average
starting salaries of graduates from each of your programs? – Oh it’s quiet
variable actually, if it’s in more of
these computation based or connection say with
engineering they’re very high. But we also place students
in non-profit organizations, or various educational
institutions so it varies from say 40 thousand to 100 and
something thousand dollars, it’s huge range. – [Chair Anderson]
Thank you, thank you. – Regent Beeson. – Thank you, thank you Mr.
Chair and thank you presenters. You probably couldn’t
have picked a better topic to talk about interdisciplinary work and collaboration. As an employer, I’m just
astounded by the interest in the environment and sometimes I feel though that graduates come out with, without, their passion gets ahead
of the science in terms of, there’s not an appreciation
for the complexity of the science that you’re
dealing with every day, and the solutions. So for those that go through
the policy side of environment, are they given enough
introduction to the science, so that their really,
they’ll leave with a respect for the work that you do ya know on the science side. Sometimes feels like
it’s a little bit, there’s little ships passing
in the night here between Liberal Arts majors on
interest in science, and the work that you’re
doing on the bench, and then the lab and the field. – [Chairman] So for an answer
out there, Professor Knight. – I can speak to my program’s
involvement in those areas. So in ESPM we have
a policy track, it’s called Policy
Planning, Law and Society, and student in that track
are required to take several core science courses,
in addition to the
normal University type things that you might, that everybody takes, they’re required to dive in
deeper into science specifically before they’re
allowed to graduate. Given that it’s a policy
or law focused track, I think we do a pretty
good job of preparing them with science to go
along with that. – [Regent Beeson] Thank you sir. – Regent Hsu, I cut you off
before and if you’d go ahead, I didn’t know you had
a follow up, I’m sorry. – Thank you Mr. Chair. I was actually looking for
three different answers from each of the programs. – Chair Anderson, Regent Hsu, I would have to look deeper
and speak with our advisors to obtain the range
of salaries that our student’s go on to
achieve right out of school. But I would highlight that
each of our departments also has a number of graduate
degrees and so there is, ya know I think that there’s
quite a wide range depending on the level
of experience game. But I could, I’d be happy
to look into that and provide those numbers later. – [Chairman] Professor Knight? – For ESPM, we have
that data on the web and I’d be happy
to point you to it. I’ve seen salaries ranging
from 35 to 40 to 70 to 80. It really just depends, as
I said initially the field is so broad that students
can do almost anything, from working at a non-profit,
where maybe the salaries aren’t that high to
working with engineers in an environmental
engineering context so hugely variable salaries. – Thank you very much,
thank you Regent Hsu. Regent Powell. – Thanks, thanks Chair Anderson,
thank you Provost Hanson and presenters. I mean, to me it’s a really
vivid sort of example of how in a very fast moving
area of inquiry, we gotta move fast to
keep our program around. We need to be agile cause
things change pretty rapidly. So I’m just, I heard the
comment that student demand is an important signal that
helps us think, determine whether we should be adding
programs or eliminating them. But as I heard the discussion, what I’m taking away is that that’s a factor but really the
driver is your view of where the area is going and you do try, to Chair Anderson’s point,
stay ahead of the curve. And you make predictions
about which areas of study really are gonna decline and
what the coming thing is, and that drives where we
add and where we take away. And so I want to just make
sure I’m interpreting, getting this or is it really
more driven by the numbers and by the student demand? – [Chair Anderson]
Provost Hanson, wanna take a stab
at that question? – Chair Anderson
and Regent Powell, it’s driven by both. I was eager to jump in on
the issue of sort of how the students are prepared for
the areas that are at the, as you said the “bleeding edge”, it’s because they have
research faculty teaching them. It’s because the faculty
are doing research and they are at
the bleeding edge. And so their
knowledge of the field drives the changes that
they make in programs but it’s also true
that at various times because of forces
that are sorta outside the University itself or these particular disciplines, there are market changes. And if students stop
taking something, even if we have faculty who
are really expert in that, we stop offering it. So it’s both together but I really want to
emphasize that part, the fact that we have
these research faculty that we are in some
sense, ahead of the curve. It makes the programs at
the University of Minnesota, distinctively valuable
to this state. – [Regent Beeson]
Great. Thank You. – [Chair Anderson] Regent Her. Yes. Thank you Provost
Hanson and faculty. My question goes to what
Regent Powell just asked and that is the ah-ha moment, it’s like, I love that we
have the macro and then we’re bringing it to the micro
where you are the faculty, you are deciding what to add, what to drop. So I want to understand
a little bit, because I know that
during the process, we as the Board of Regent,
provide approval at the end but I want to know at the
beginning, what is the ah-ha moment of this is when
we need to drop this, is there a trigger? What goes into the thinking
and at the Department Faculty Level is there enough
support or insight to be nimble, to balance
creativity, innovation, verses what is core and
what we have to keep? And so, I’m wanting
to understand a
little bit more about ya know, as you think
about the future, what to keep, what to drop? Are we at that sweet spots
in terms of majoring that we’re offering within
a certain school, within a certain department, what do we need to add? That type of thinking
at the faculty level. – Professor Whitney? – Yes, Chair
Anderson, Regent Her, That’s a great, that’s
the question right? We ar always evaluating
and trying to figure out are we in the right
place and for us our new program proposal,
it took quite a long time to decide this is
what we need to do. Can we do it with
our existing program? Or just getting students
into this track better with better advising and we
just kept hearing from our newer faculty, from
our students, from
our advisory board. No, I think a major program
is the right thing to make sure that those students get
there and we wanted to make sure too that we were this
balance between the discovery and the scholarship was very
well integrated with you know, career preparation. And so getting that right,
it took quite a while and a lot of consultation and
maybe we don’t have it quite right yet, we’re
gonna examine our results, how are our students doing? What kind of career
success do they have, are there new courses
that they need? We’re requiring them to
take courses in soil-science and CFANS and GIS which
we haven’t required of our traditional earth,
science students. Are those the right courses, is there something
else they need? It’s a continues process. – Thank you. Regent Mayeron. – I was looking at the
materials that was provided in anticipation of this report
and looking at what you all look to for demand and
development of new program. I do see that one of the
areas that you will apparently seek out information
is from employers and in terms of what
it is they either need or foresee in the future
and as we keep hearing about their, keep predicting a
significant work for shortage here in Minnesota, that we’re not gonna
have enough people, adequately trained for
jobs that I’m not sure, employers exactly know what
their going to need in the next five to ten years. So, how does, either
specifically or generally, how do we go about determining, what are the workforce needs? What’s gonna be needed
out there from our current or future employers
here in the state or nationwide or worldwide,
to make sure that we’re offering a program that
will ultimately train people to meet those needs? – [Chairman] Professor Knight?
– I could provide, I guess an anecdote from ESPM. When we consider whether
to add a new sub-plan, within the major, that comes from
faculty, initially. Someone has to organize a group
of faculty to support this thing and to write a proposal and the proposal has to
demonstrate that there is student demand for
this area of study, that there is employer demand
for that area of study, and that there are
jobs available now, and then providing data
about what the salaries and placement rates
at those jobs are. So it’s very much a quantitative
response to an idea. We have to justify
that this makes sense to add to the program. Did that get at your Question?
– So as a follow up then, is it up to the faculty
person who’s proposing this for example, in addition of
a program or a sub-program, to go out into the workplace
to interview or survey potential employers to
see what it is they need or what it is they’re lacking, or what it is they foresee
they’re gonna need in the future to make sure that the program
is aligning with those needs. Who’s responsible
for doing that? – It’s up to the
proposing faculty and it relates to the
point I made earlier about how the people
that we work with, the people who
fund our research, and the people that we
do our research with, are often the employers
of our graduates. So we have very strong
relationships with those people. So it doesn’t have to be a
formal survey or potentially very expensive survey,
we know those people and we can ask those
questions directly. – That’s interesting, thank you. We got a couple more Regents
and then to stay on schedule we’re gonna cut it off
there, cause today is just information, not action. Regent Simonson, – Thank you Terry Anderson,
thank you presenters. I really like what I heard
about the collaboration on this topic, across colleges. As you’re well aware,
animal poultry, health, our big industries
in our state here. And environmental issues
are constant problems in that area and I wonder if
there’s any collaboration like with veterinary college, because that’s my
field and I really, dealing with environmental
issues is a big issue. And I think people
coming out with an undergraduate degree to help address some of these things,
there would be opportunity. – [Chairman] Any comment to
either of you, Regent Griffin or Professor Griffin? I just gave you a promotion.
– Chair Anderson and Regent Simonson, I can’t
comment on direct collaboration between our program
and your alma mater. But I would say
that for example, we do have these large
enrollment classes that touch on environmental themes and so, this semester I’m
teaching our departments, got 330 students from across
the Twin Cities campus. I was looking at the
profile of the student body for the class and equally, we
have some veterinary science students there. I know for example one of
the things that we talk about in that class is
the Green Revolution and how transformative the
Haber-Bosch process was to developing fertilizer. I mean synthesize of ammonia
is, has been transformative for the global society
and that has rich history here at the University
of Minnesota of course, but there were some
unintended consequences so I know in my home
state of Arkansas where animal and poultry practices
are really important, we’ve had a lot of troubles
with water quality tied to animal waste and so on and so forth. And so, I know students
are getting some at least broad perspective
on how these revolutionary, technological solutions
don’t always play out without some unintended consequences. – [Regent Simonson] Thank you. – [Chair Anderson] Thank you. Okay, Regent Kenyanya. – Thank you Mr.
Chair, presenters, thank you for taking the time
and sharing this with us. I think my question is
more for the Provost, I was wondering how the
University then responds after the fact, in terms
of, aligning resources and driving them to
where they’re needed. So for example, if a college,
one college is identified, they no longer need to
offer a certain program, whether it’s due to student
demand, University priorities, or what the workforce
is asking for, and at the same time, another
college has added a program we still have faculty in this
college trained to teach this and we don’t have them in
the other ones so how do we then get those resources,
whether financial or human resources,
moved around? – [Chair Anderson]
Provost Hanson. – Chairman Anderson
and Regent Kenyanya, if there is student
demand it would actually be realized in the department
that’s already offering it. If indeed it’s something
else that’s being, that’s a slightly different
flavor that, ya know is being grown up
in a different area and students are
migrating to that, there are other ways, I mean, what happens in the department
that has lost enrollment in a program is that those
faculty are often redeployed into other areas
of their expertise or they reconfigure
their degree programs or offer minors or they
cooperate in various ways with a slightly
different flavored thing that’s growing up elsewhere. I mean, it’s one
of the reasons that we want to stress the dynamism
of both the faculty careers where again because the
faculty are doing research and know where fields are going, that they’re able to stay
one step ahead of what the students should be learning
when they are going to be going out into those fields. And so it’s a complicated, interconnected dance between, the student interests
at various times and the training the
faculty you’ve had, but the continuing
development that faculty have because they are
also researchers. It’s not just that we
allow a program to grow up in one school or
college or department that’s so like another one
that’s just dying down. It wouldn’t happen that way
because of the character of the consultation that we
do when developing these, we don’t allow
duplicative programs. – Thank you and Regent Powell
you’re gonna bring us home with the last question. – Thanks Chair Anderson,
very quick follow up on Regent Mayeron’s question
in that exchange. You mentioned you
have a number of significant corporate
research partners, can you tell us who
a few of those are? – My role as Department Head, I formed an advisory
board three years ago that specifically was from
regional professionals with the very focused
task of advising us, if we’re doing the
right thing for our, career preparedness
for students, for
non-academic careers. So I invited, people
very generously have volunteered their time
from Braun Intertec and Barr Engineering and a range
of smaller, geo-technical firms as well as
government and non-profits. – Thank you. – Regent Powell,
just so you know, there’s probably room for
other corporate entities to donate to those
resources too. (laughter) Just so you know that. I just want to say this has
been a really interesting and enlightening program,
we got a little into the environmental science
although it was a program on how we do program changes. So I think today when we
get to the consent agenda, just know that the program
changes that we have on there, have on there from
Provost Office, have been well vetted. I think that was proven today. So unless you people have
anything to comment on, I want to thank you
for being here today and thank you for your service to the University of Minnesota. Thank you. – (Regents) Thank you. – As soon as we are ready, we are gonna go
to our next item, which is addressing
affordability, supporting student
financing and education. And again this is a discussion,
information item today, there’s no votes. And then we’re gonna have
Vice Provost McMaster, I haven’t seen him yet but
he’s probably here somewhere and Director Tina
Falkner of Student Office of Student Finance. And when they’re ready,
we’re going to let them go, go ahead. Student financial literacy
has been a big push of mine, I think we need to do what
we can for the students here and we’re gonna get a
little report on that today. So Vice Provost McMaster,
Director Falkner, are you ready? – I believe we are. – Whenever, the floor’s yours. – Good. Chair Anderson, members
of the committee, we’re glad to be back here
today for a round two discussion of this topic. I’m gonna have to admit that
I wish I was in the last presentation rather
than this one, all about geography but I’ll try to do
the best I can here. (laughter) I wanted to thank, first of all John Burczek Dryer, he’s
our financial aid analyst and he does terrific
work for us in preparing a lot of the data
and the analysis that you’re looking at today. So what we’ll do is start
with the National Landscape, kinda look at where we sit
as a state compared to others and I think you’re well
aware that we have tended to be a high debt state. This graph shows that, we’re on the upper
decile of student debt. We’ve been even hire than
that in terms of the rankings so the good news is
we’ve slipped a bit. Most of the high debt, very
high debt states are on the East coast, we’ll see a map
shortly, that depicts that. Interesting, given it’s
size and relatively low debt compared to others, the
University of Minnesota, actually bring the
state arrearage down because of our size
in terms of debt, so we need to keep that in mind. The other fact that I think
is interesting is that again as a campus, the Twin Cities
campus in this ranking, which you can’t do that, put an institution in a state
ranking but I’ll do it anyway. We come out 36 in
terms of that list. So to the map and to the
inappropriately placed as usual, Alaska and Hawaii. What you’re looking at is the
national distribution of debt. And I don’t think this really
surprises anybody in terms of what you’re seeing. You see a gradient that goes
down from the East coast with a very high percentage
of private education, private institutions
to the West coast, with a high percentage
of public education. You also see a few
anomalies here, in terms of the
spacial distribution. One of course is our
own state, Minnesota, which stands out a bit in
terms of the upper middle West, with an average debt for all
students, all institutions at around 32 thousand. You see some other
interesting anomalies here, Alabama in the South, you see Oregon with
low debt in the West. So it’s not a perfect
gradient but basically that’s the general trend. In terms of the way we
thinK about affordability in the Provost’s Office and the Office of
Undergraduate Education, we wanted to frame this
in three major parts. One is student success and
we think we’ve made some significant progress
around timely graduation but in addition to that we
also have made significant investments around student
success with advising, tutoring, career counseling,
improving our classroom. It’s a long long story
here and you’ve heard bits and pieces of this before but it all adds up
to timely graduation. Another piece of this
would be controlling costs. So keeping tuition increases
at a reasonable rate, we’ll talk about
that in a moment and of course a
critical, absolutely
critical piece of this would be increasing
scholarships and other gift aid. We’re thinking constantly about
what are the next steps here and we’re always anxious
to hear from the Board and senior administrators about
their views and next steps but we certainly want
to continue our focus on financial literacy, you’re
gonna see a big step forward in that direction
later on today. In controlling the
educational costs, an example here are book. Our bookstore has a whole
series of initiatives to try to control the costs of
textbooks, rental books, e-books and other
mechanisms to make sure students don’t have to over
spend in that category. We certainly want to continue
our focus on increasing scholarship support, especially for our
lowest income students. We want to continue
our improvements in retention graduation rates, in particular for under
resourced students. We’re doing very well
with our graduation rates, we won’t get into a deep
dive on that topic today but they are somewhat
lumpy and inconsistent and so we want to
be mindful of that. So those are the three
major areas we’ll talk about and we’ll talk about
student success first. Within our enrollment
management plan, these are some of the key
initiatives that are underway. I obviously won’t do a
deep dive into all these, I’ll mention a few. One is around our retention
efforts and something that I’ll mention is called
the Leaver Study. When we find out in the
spring and over the summer that a student has not
registered for the fall, we get on them as fast as
we can, we badger them, I’m sorry that’s a bad word, (room laughter) we needle them, we nudge
them throughout the summer with email and phone calls
to find out what happened, why they didn’t register. And in fact, that’s
really changed the picture in terms of the number
of students who we
can get to return the following fall. Another would be around
transfer student experiences where we put tremendous effort
into transfer orientation, transfer housing,
transfer curriculum, our transfer pathways and in fact I think in October
there’s another conversation around some of those pathways. So suffice it to say we have
a whole series of initiatives that continue the work
around student success. One of the major impacts
of this work has been the improvement in our four
year graduation rate. These are Twin Cities data
that you’re looking at here but the number that we like
to point out is the increase from the early
1990’s around a 15%, an embarrassing 15% four year graduation rate to
approximately 71% up today. And we want to continue to
improve those rates over the next few years as well. We also, in terms of
controlling costs, talk about a resident tuition
and I think this graph is a good story for this
Board and for this University, that there have been very
minimal resident tuition increases over the
last half decade. So thanks to the
Board for doing this because this has significantly
helped our ability to control the cost of
undergraduate education. But the flip side of
this is really increasing scholarship support. And the next graph
really tells it all. In many ways we could stop
here and go home today, at least we could. (chuckle) Because this shows the four
basic curves that lead to controlling costs. So let’s spend just
a moment on this. The one curve at the bottom
that I’ll mention is the relatively flat
enrollment growth. Now enrollment growth
is going up slightly, we’ll hear more about
this falls’ enrollment
in the next few weeks as we hit our census date but basically there hasn’t been a significant increases there. What we see here is the
tuition going up a 191% over this period,
the last 20 years but more importantly the gift
aid going up at twice that rate at around 400%. So I think that’s the ratio
that becomes important in affordability. Yes tuition’s gone up but
the University has re-doubled it’s efforts to make sure that
we’re back filling that plus with lots of gift aid. And we’ll see a richer
picture about that in the next few minutes. There’s some lonesome bumps
here that I won’t get into unless you want me to. In the middle of
the debt, excuse me, of the scholarship grant curve, the deal with this federal
stimulus money that came into the University and was
counted in different ways over a period of
time and that causes superdervasions in the curve. This is the chart
that is the model for our financial aid picture and this is one were
we’ve added together both our gift aid data and
our loan data over about a ten year period. The first graph you
see is for the system, so this represents the entire
system and the gift aid categories which you know
well, University scholarships, PELL, state grant and so on. And then the different kinds
of loans, federal loans, state and University
loans, private and then the parent
PLUS categories. One of the new pieces of the
relationship that we saw from putting these together
is the ratio between gift aid and loans. And what we see for the
system is that ten years ago that ratio was 200
thousand- excuse me, 200 million to 230 and
that ratio has closed now to 245 to 241 and I think
that’s an interesting way of looking at gift
aid to borrowing. And the next slide, identical data but just for the Twin Cities, shows that same kind
of relationship of a closing of the gap between
gift aid and loans to the point now where on the
Twin Cities campus, we provide 175
million in gift aid and the total loan would be 170. I will point out a troubling
trend here, in these data and that’s the increase in
the parent Plus loan category. And we’ve seen over the
last few years that bump up fairly quickly and we’re
not completely certain why but we’re figuring it out. The next slide shows some
of the disaggregated data for gift aid, across geography. The NRNR number that you see
here and one of the reasons that it is higher
is that includes the
wavers that are used to maintain enrollment
in that category. We give relatively little
aid to reciprocity students so that’s why that
piece of the curve or that bar is low. And within each one of those
bars the number in parenthesis at the bottom shows the percent, percent who receive gift aid within that category. So 85% of students from
greater Minnesota receive some type of gift aid. Only 51% of reciprocity students receive any form of gift aid. Same set of bars except this
time we shift to the colleges and you can see the college
distribution of gift aid, which varies fairly
significantly. See EHD is at the high
end because there’s
a high percentage of low income PELL students. First generation students
who are receiving significant amounts of PELL grant funding
and state grant funding and U of M promised funding. At the low end,
College of Design, is in that position because they have a
very high percentage of reciprocity students
who don’t receive much gift aid from the U. And so there’s a story
in some ways behind each one of those
collegiate numbers. This chart which we
compute every few years because it’s a very
labor intensive process, tries to tease out
the difference between need based aid and non-need based aid in what we distribute
from the University. So to cut to the chase here,
as we look at the ratio and we look at this ratio
every few years to make sure we’re maintaining a balance
that we think is appropriate. At this moment it’s around
64 to 60% of all the gift aid goes for what we call need and about 40% which mostly
involves scholarships, merit scholarships, goes into that category. I will note also here that
a new category that’s grown over the last few years because of work in the Provost
Office and the foundation, is around middle income. Middle income is a huge
need for our students now. We’ve updated this slide
which we show you each year, which really gets into
the model behind our, or the strategy
behind our packaging for different AGI’s,
adjusted gross incomes. So the number that you want to
focus on here is the red line which shows the four AGI’s
for families from 25 thousand up to 120 thousand, why
do we go do 120 thousand? Because of our U of M Promise
Program that goes up to 120 AGI. As we look down the
first column what we, I think the very positive
story here is that, between the gift aid which
includes PELL, state grant, U of M Promise, the SEOG grant
from the federal government, along with work study, students are offered nearly 20
thousand dollars in gift aid. So we do heavily package
our 0 EFC students, expected family contribution, with the maximum
of gift aid we can. However you see that those
students are also offered loans. Now these students may also
receive merit based aid, that’s not included in here. This is just a distribution
of our need based gift aid. And you can see as you
shift across the AGI levels to the right, the
amount of gift aid drops off precipitously. So a family who is making
100 thousand dollars a year, theoretically, if there no
scholarships on the table, would be offered, 55 hundred dollars
in student loans, that’s the max, max-out
with the federal government and almost 20 thousand
dollars in parent loan. – [Director Falkner]
So this set of data has two sets of information, the striped bar is the, for families that are
earning 75 thousand or less and the solid bar is
for families that are making 110 thousand
dollars or less, and the exciting part about
this is this is exactly where we want to be as a system. All of the University of
Minnesota Campuses are at the low end of this and
even when we consider some of the private schools
that have very different discounting
strategies than we do. – [Vice Provost McMaster]
We think this is one of the critical pieces of information for the Board to see and that is the effect of our
four year graduation rate. So these are estimates,
these aren’t exact numbers but our estimates show that because of increasing our
graduation rate over this period and these are the cohorts
that go from 2005 to 2014, about a ten year period. From 47 to 71%, we’ve
been able to save students in borrowing, around
20 million dollars. The other piece of this to
note is that as students delay graduation from
four years to six years, the percent to borrow go
up 10% which is significant and the amount that they
have to borrow goes up 85 hundred dollars. So that’s significant. The number here we have is
that this work around pushing four year graduation has
enabled as many as 69 hundred students to finish in four years
who probably would not have without the efforts
by the University. This table which
you’ve seen before and we crammed a lot of
data on this table, we know, shows for both the Twin
Cities and the System, the number of graduates over
time, the percent who graduated with no debt, climbing
to 40 percent. And then the average student
debt which has been decreasing now, over time, I think
you’ve seen the numbers. And I wanted to comment on this because we often
talk about this 40%. First of all, why do we report it this
way, students who borrow? Cause that’s the IPES number, the number that we have to
report to the federal government is for students who borrow. The real number here,
which is a real average, if you included all students,
not just those who borrow, would be somewhere around
16 thousand dollars. Not the 25 or 26
thousand you see here. Several years ago we actually
did a study where we looked at the indebtedness for
students who left the University without a degree. This is maybe four
or five years ago and interestingly there was
not a significant difference between the indebtedness of
those who finished with a degree and those who didn’t, aside from the fact, they
didn’t have a degree to rely on when they were done. And so that undoubtedly
had a major impact on their future earnings. I think an interesting
study related to this would be to look
at moving forward, the indebtedness for
those who graduate, the indebtedness for those
who leave the University and go to another institution, which we can get now from the
National Clearing House data, and then those who we think
haven’t finished at all. So somebody needs to do that. – (woman) We’ll take it on. (laughter) – The next slide
is one that shows the average loan, excuse me, average indebtedness
for the state of Minnesota and as with the other
curve around net cost, you can see then our
campuses are in fact below and often well below the average
for the state of Minnesota. So again I think this shows
that the policies that have been put in place are at least in
part working for our students, next slide is set for the
Big Ten and so we lie at the lower end of the Big Ten. A few comments here
on those institutions who have lower debt, Nebraska has very low
tuition compared to the rest of the Big Ten. Michigan has a boatload
of endowment and gift aid and Illinois has a high
percentage of resident students and other complications
we can get into in terms of why they’re low. What’s interesting
here and I’m always, I don’t want to say stunned, but pretty surprised
when I see this number is at Pen State, the
average indebtedness is 38 thousand dollars a year. They also have incredibly
high tuition compared to the rest of the Big Ten. And then to kind of
finish up on the data and controlling costs what
we see here is the average loan debt by college. So we can match that up with
the gift aid by college. At the low end, these are
undergraduate students, is the medical school, that would be the Mortuary
Science Program with low debt. At the high end of this
we have Dental Hygiene, where the students often have
to go to full year programs, including summer programs that
drives up the indebtedness for those students. And then you can
see the gradient across the rest of the colleges. So that’s the picture we
wanted to paint, in terms of where we sit with our
gift aid, borrowing, loans. We want to shift now
into financial literacy where there’s a new initiative that
I think is pretty impressive that we
thought you’d want to see. – [Director Falkner] Yes, I’m gonna talk just a bit
before I go into the video that we’re hoping will work. But the financial literacy
and debt awareness, we really appreciate the
opportunity to come here and talk with you
all about this. This is something that’s very
near and dear to our house, or our heart in the
Office of Student Finance as well in the Office
of Undergrad Education and through all of the campuses. We know that our students
need to know how to manage their money and
that’s not to say that they don’t know how to but
we know that many of them don’t common with
that skill set. And so to that end,
each of our campuses, address financial literacy
a little differently and it depends sometimes
on expertise and resources as well as availability of
people who are well versed in what we want to address. And on the Twin Cities campus,
the One-Stop student services is our focal point for our
financial literacy efforts and we’ve been doing this
for approximately 15 years. What started out as a very
small sort of tips and tricks for managing your money
has evolved over 15 years into what you can see in
the four sort of pillars that are depicted
on the picture. There are financial wellness
appointments that are one-on-one appointments with
students that they set up with a one stop counselor who has been trained in
financial wellness counseling. And this is student driven,
it is not hypothetical, a One-Stop counselor
will look at a student’s it could be their
financial aid package, it could be their indebtedness, it could be if someone
brings them a budget. They will work with the
student on what topic they want to know about. And students can come back
for more than one of them. And these have been very well
received by our students. We introduced the concept
of financial literacy and financial wellness and
awareness to our incoming students during welcome week. We have a very, if
you’ve never seen it, we have a very entertaining
and interactive presentation that is part of welcome week. And as an extra
incentive this year if students attended that,
they could put their name in a drawing for a 500
dollar scholarship, we had six of them that will
be applied spring semester. And we also follow that up with, during the fall semester
there is a series of workshops that is targeted at our
incoming students that range from budgeting to planning
for your sophomore year. And again as an added incentive for students to
participate in these, they can put their name
in a drawing for each one of the workshop series
that they go to, for a thousand dollar
scholarship that will be applied fall semester of the next
year as a retention effort. And I have a quote
here from a student, we let them know in June
if their name was selected and this student said, “This award has made a huge
impact on how I’m able to pay for college this year. It saved me from taking a loan
out for the fall semester.” And we have a few
other ones like that, that are, I believe
in your docket. So our first year students
are introduced to it then and as our students
are graduating, our
One-Stop counselors are also available during
what’s called grad-fest, which is where people can
get their caps and gowns and announcements, and
learn about exit interviews. And they’re there to talk
with our graduating seniors about budgeting and planning
for your financial future as you move out of
being a student. So we’re there from the
beginning to the end and all times in between. So now I’m going to hopefully, make the presentation work
the way it is suppose to. (laugh) – You all can talk about
something while I do this. (laughter) All right. (cough) Come on back. All right Skeeter we’re at a go. Here I go. Escape. So what we have here is, I don’t want this to go back. I was gonna do a live demo
but we all decided that that was a bad idea,
they never work. So what we have here is
a creative video of a recreated, re-envisioned My
Finances tab in the My U Portal, and before I go into
the details of this, it’s really
important that I say, the creation of what you see
was a collaborative effort of portions of the Office of
the Undergraduate Education, all members of the Student
Finance, Financial Aid and some of the records
side of all of our campuses, as well as the My U Portal team, which is part of
Institutional Analysis and the Office of
Information Technology. It took lots of us to figure
out how to make this work within the technology we have, as well as to think outside
the box of presenting things that you’ll
find as I show you, we would normally just
push stuff out in an email. So I am now going to
walk you through this and this is our, are you all familiar
with what My U is? – [Committee Members] Yes. – You think of it as
the electronic doorway. The My U Portal it is
our electronic doorway for our students to
conduct their business of being a student. It’s where they go to
register for classes, to check their class schedule, to interact with their financial
aid, to pay their bill. So this is, our students
are very familiar with this and if you want a
couple of stats, the first, for the
week of August 26th
through September 5th there were 249,169
thousand total users, for a total of
1,353,780 sessions, resulting in
2,939,549 page views. So as you can see, it
gets a lot of activity. So in the my finances tab, it starts out with
billing and payment, and I’m gonna pause
it periodically so
I can talk a little bit about what you’re seeing. The two boxes that you can see and it’s probably a little
blurry for you in the audience, I apologize, then pinkish red box is a call
to action for our students to either enroll in the
Boynton Health Service medical benefit or to wave it. If students don’t wave this,
they are auto enrolled. And that is a charge of
1,116 dollars a semester. Inevitably we have lots of
students who think they’ve waved it and they haven’t and before we put it in
front of them right here, they would get an email and then they would
have to think, “Well did I click
on that? Did I not?” And this takes them directly
to the eligible student’s link, takes them directly to
the Boynton Place where they can wave or enroll
in the service. Since we launched, this part
we launched in January of 2019 and from the time we launched
it in January of 2019 to the middle of February, we had a 15% increase
in students that
waved this coverage, that resulted in about
a 600,000 dollar savings for our students because they
did not need the coverage. We can’t give you the
stats for fall yet because students have until
the 26th of September to do it, but I anticipate it will be
very similar to what we saw in January. The yellow box that you
see under the red box, is for students that appear, based on what we have as
our home location in our student information system
that they appear to be from a reciprocity state. That is their call to action
to fill out the paperwork to be eligible for
instate tuition. Students are no automatically
eligible unless they fill out the
reciprocity paperwork and we have many students who
don’t remember to do this. Again, they get an
email from admission, they will get an
email from our office but the emails,
probably like most of us get cluttered in
their email box. Putting it front and
center and color coding it, brings it to their attention. Since we’ve launched this
revised version of My Finances from the middle
of June until now, and we’ve launched it
in the middle of June on the Twin Cities campus, we had about 830 students who
had this message presented to them. As of last week over 500 of
them had taken care of their reciprocity paperwork. That saves those students about, it’s an average because
we’ve got different rates depending on when
students entered, it saves them an average of
about 15,000 dollars a year. For our standpoint and
from a One-Stop standpoint that is a marvelous customer
service perspective, it allows our students to, they don’t have
to call us and say “Why does my bill
appear to be wrong?” Or realize it in a couple
years later when it’s too late for us to have them fill out
the paperwork for that year. So that is a big boom
for our students. Here’s where they
would make a payment and update their direct deposit. So next we’re gonna go to
the next tab which is the Financial Aid tab. I’m gonna stop
here for a moment, the green box up at the top
is their front and center for a very important reason, this is called satisfactory
academic progress. We have to calculate
this each year from the federal government,
from the department of ed, that says students are making
progress towards their degree based on a few different things. It is cumulative GPA, are
you completing the courses that you are enrolled in? As well as are you
completing your degree within what’s called the
maximum time frame? Students have 150% of a program
length so it’s 180 credits. This use to come to
them again in an email, now it is here. What students can also do,
if they click on this box, their able to see how we
calculate their satisfactory academic progress as
well as what are their, their exact specifics
of their case. Next students will do something
that we’ve had for years which is called
Financial Aid Steps, they’ll select their aid year and what you’re gonna see
here in this step wise fashion is what we call
Financial Aid Steps. It tells students, they
don’t have to call One-Stop, it tells them where they are
at in the process for their financial aid. In this step three
in the middle, where it says respond
to your rewards, when we are in the middle
of actual packaging which happens in July, students before their allowed
to respond to their awards, which is where they
accept or decline, could it be loans, we automatically accept
their scholarships. This is were we present
them with borrowing history and you do have a picture or
you have an example of what our borrowing history
letter looks like. In the docket materials,
they can’t go beyond accept, decline until they acknowledge
that they have seen their borrowing history. We have been doing a
borrowing history since 2015 and this past, not this
summer but the summer before, we were able to pull
out the information from the National Student
Loan Data System, which is the federal
database for any federally known about loans. So if someone started an another
institution and came here and had loans there, we’re able to take
that information out, combine it with our information
so they’re getting a much more robust picture of what
they’re actual borrowing is. They will also see what their
monthly repayment will be over a stand ten
year repayment plan and it lives in their Student
Information System so they can see it. (clears throat) Students also get
a personalized, if you want to call it that, cost of attendance
that is based on their college of enrollment
and their program. We know that some are
more expensive than others depending on some
of the classes. All of the question mark icons
have information behind them that students have
had for before, it’s now connected
to the data outlet. (cough) And next we have
Financial Aid History, which is my favorite part. This presents students with
all of their financial aid history with us and what
they can do with this, and it goes back to when they
started their enrollment. It goes through all of it. So it’s PELL grants,
loans, state grant. They can use the filter
box that you see at the top and they can filter on
particular types of aid. If they want to see what
kinds of loans they’ve had, they type in the word loan,
it shows up right there. Students are also able to
export this to a PDF or Excel if they want to share
it with someone else. And this is also
quite remarkable, at least in my estimation, it tells them the interest
rate, cause different loans have different interest rates
and different repayment terms. And at the bottom,
for students who have PELL Grant Minnesota
State Grant and U promise, it tells them the amount of
aid usage that they have used of that type of grant. And translate that to how
many terms approximately do you have left? And then the final tab that
I will show you in a second. It’s the Academics tab and
this is available on the Twin Cities and
Rochester Campus. This is a visual depiction
that mimics what we have in our PELL grant usage, showing students, where if
you look at the green mark, you can see and that is the
benchmark of where a student should be in order to
graduate in four years. The blue is courses that
a student has taken, the yellow are their
in progress credits. So students can see
where they are at in their degree program. And we did these
intentionally to look similar because there is a tie
between your aid usage and your degree progress. There are action
plans for students. If they are on track or
if they are not on track and we are working with the
other campuses to make this available for their
students in the coming year. All right so now I have
to try and do magic again. (laughter) – {Chair Anderson] Does that
conclude the presentation or is there more? – We’re done. – That’s it. – Okay cause I think
while you’re doing
that I’m gonna start teeing up some, I know we’re gonna
have a lot of questions or I at least thing we are. Regent Hsu do you want
to start with that? – Yes thank you Mr. Chair,
thank you presenters. I just want to start with
one quick question about the way the students live, ya know, you had a lot of
slides about Minnesota, are you basing that on
their high school address? Or, I don’t understand how
the data gets collected for our Minnesota kids. – Sure, Chair Anderson, Regent
Hsu, the way we determine residency and the geography
is their home address. And that’s kind of the
standard that’s used in higher education. So if a student has a home
address of, Wausau Wisconsin, that’s what’s used for
identifying their location. – Um hum. – [Chair Anderson] Regent Hsu. – So then is there data, since you’re using old data
basically for addresses because that’s where
they went to high school, if they decide not to come
back to the state of Minnesota than is there another
analysis that then shows what the indebtedness of
Minnesota students is? – I’m not sure I fully follow
you’re question on this. Are you saying they gain
residency in Minnesota? – No no no, what I’m saying
is okay in high school they graduate and you have
their high school address so you’re using the high
school address to calculate all this stuff but for students
that move away, from Minnesota to go to school and
they never come back, you’re still counting them
as Minnesota students? – That would be
correct. Wouldn’t it? Yeah. – So is there another analysis
that shows what happens to students after they graduate
from whatever college they went to and if they don’t
come back to Minnesota then we don’t count them anymore as, in terms of their indebtedness. Cause you can see where, a
Minnesota students can go to a really high class state like
one of the coasts or lets say the East coast and then
they don’t come back. Well we’re counting them as if, I mean we’re counting their
tuition or their loans against Minnesota whereas they’re really not
Minnesotans anymore. – We would be, sorry
Chair Anderson, – [Chair Anderson]
Yeah, no go ahead. – Regent Hsu, we would be
doing that to the point of graduation when they graduate
they would be counted as Minnesota residents
lets say in California, and then after that point
in time, I assume they would become residents of
California if they stay there. – Right, so there’s
no data afterwards, we can’t figure out
what’s going on after they – [Vice Provost McMaster]
That would be correct. – Okay. – Does that answer the
question Regent Hsu? Okay thank you. Regent Simonson. – Thank you Chair Anderson,
thank you presenters, I appreciate all you’re
doing to help students with the costs. But as you may know
from past meetings, I’m an advocate for looking
for ways to lower tuition and I think on one
of your slides, I think you said over
a ten year period, went up 193 or is it a
20 year period, 193%? One of your early slides. Whatever it was there
and I understand, from my business background
I focus on costs of good sold frequently and how
that looks over time and I look at
tuition in a sense, cost to goods sold, okay,
and things that go into that obviously are labor costs,
faculty staff, things like other operational
expenses like facilities, those kinds of things, I appreciate that. So this may not be a
fair question for you, maybe more of somebody
else in administration but is there any particular
area that you can mention that has increase of, much
greater than what I’d call an average, you’re talking
193, any area that has gone up substantially like that? Over that period of time? – Chair Anderson
and Regent Simonson, I’m afraid that’s way
out of my wheelhouse, to be commenting on the costs
of the different categories but I believe there are
others, maybe at the table or in the room who would
have a better idea than I do about the differential
increases among IT or faculty salaries or
infrastructure or energy or the other myriad
costs of running a major R1 flagship University. – Thank you. – [Chair Anderson]
Regent Beeson. – Thank you Mr. Chair,
thank you Vice Provost, Master and Director Falkner. Vice Provost do you talk
briefly about the Plus loans, maybe you pull that slide
back up if you could because what I’m sensing is
that there is a shift going on, we’re moving in the
right directions on obviously student
indebtedness and graduation, and all the policies that have
been in place for a number of years are now showing up
the data and we’re moving in the right direction. Both against ourselves
and in the industry but at the end of they day,
it’s a family that has to handle debt, it’s
not just the student. And if we’re shifting debt
from the student to the parents and I can’t tell from this,
I can’t tell a lot from this other than the fact
that as you mentioned, that has been increasing. But would you be able to
produce for this Board the family’s indebtedness
coming out of college, not just the students, as
you roll those together, per student? If you were to put a number around
the parent’s average debt that comes out and put
that in with the students for a family, what is
that gonna look like over and how many years have
we been able to produce that Plus data? Cause I’ve not seen the
Plus data ever as that about the Board. It’s good information but it
feels like new information. – Chair Anderson
and Regent Beeson, my belief is, and I’d probably
have to check back with our analyst on this, that we could in fact produce
the amount of indebtedness from Plus loans for families, and produce some
distributions of that. In fact I think maybe we
have some of those slides, we didn’t bring them today because of limitations that
show not only the distribution of student loans themselves
but student plus, parent Plus loans. So those data are in fact
obtainable and presentable. – So a follow up Vice Provost,
what would you predict those slides would show? – I think those slides would
parallel what you’re seeing here in that over
the last half decade, the borrowing has shifted. And you can also see
a bit of a shift into the private sector here. What has shifted into parents
bearing more of the loan burden for the family. – I think we would see that
the preponderance is with, in our middle income families because as Vice Provost
McMaster presented, that is where there is very
little to none gift aid unless they are having
merit scholarships. I think we would see it in the middle income families mostly. The one thing that we probably
wouldn’t be able to do, I know we wouldn’t be able to, we don’t know if parents
borrow from sources other than parent Plus. They may have a
relationship with the bank that is where they chose
to, or a credit union or something where
they chose to borrow. – Or a second mortgage. – Or a second mortgage. Those things we
wouldn’t know about. – Well thank you Mr.
Chair and presenter, I think the Board, I trust my colleagues would
be interested in seeing that more expansive data that
includes those other sources, the extent that we have those and it looks like
we do have some now. Thank you, thanks again. – [Chair Anderson] Student
representative, Basarich. – Thank you Chair Anderson,
thank you presenters. So kind of on the same slide,
that was referenced earlier, are the 395% and 191%
increases in scholarship, grants and tuition respectively,
adjusted for inflation? And then what has been the
trend in cost of attendance thinking holistically about
the price of higher education? – Go ahead Vice
Provost McMaster, – Chair Anderson,
Representative Basarich, these are not
standardized costs, adjusted costs. There are two different
indices you could here here, one, the most standard
indices used is the HEPI, the higher education index. In terms of the cost
of attendance could you follow through with
that a bit further? What did you have in mind there? – Yeah so just the historic
trend of cost of attendance in general, that graph
obviously just talks about tuition rates but we know
that in, across the state, housing is increasing and
than fees towards students for things like activities,
athletic facilities, those types of things are
shifting more and more onto students as well. Do you have numbers that kinda
represent not just tuition but the actual cost of
attending the University? – Yeah, we do. We definitely have cost of
attendance numbers as well. The cost of attendance number
is critical because that’s what’s used in
calculating net price. Where you take the cost of
attendance and then subtract out the gift aid. Certainly and this
maybe Director Falkner, could comment on this, certainly the tuition rates
and fees have been going up more quickly than the
full cost of attendance because housing and food
has not been going up at the same rate. Using the University of
Minnesota as an example, our administration has worked
very hard to keep those costs at the low end of the Big Ten. And so in terms of cost of
attendance that’s where we sit quiet well. So absolutely, you
have to include that, you also have to take
into account fees. I think you’d see fees
going up similarly across the country. I don’t think there’s anything
unique in terms of our fee signature on top of
our tuition signature. – [Representative
Basarich] Thank you. – Thank you. I’m just gonna remind my
colleges here and and also the presenters, this is
really really important stuff, we’re trying to keep the
costs to the students down but we do have
another presentation. I do want to continue
on with this questioning cause it is that important. But I’ll ask the
questioners to be brief and the answers to be
brief if we can. Okay? That way we’ll
get more answered. Student Representative King. – Thank you Chair Anderson
and thank you presenters. My question was, I know
that we are talking about undergrad affordability which
is a great topic to talk about but I was also wondering
how does financial support compare to our graduate
students and our undergraduate students over all? And also how is that
going to affect our, because we are going towards
a higher education purpose, and also how do our financial resources also affect our first generation
students as well? – Chair Anderson,
Representative King. You asked about graduate
education, did I hear that correctly on top of this? So we don’t have data on
graduate education here within this. Certainly one of
the contributors in
terms of the overall indebtedness of the student,
is the debt that a student, she or he carries
into graduate school and there are lots of data that
shows the total indebtedness for a student
across the spectrum. We aren’t ready to talk about
that here cause we don’t have those data with us, that
would be another conversation. – [Chair Anderson] Thank
you. Regent Sviggum. – Mr. Chairman I might
fail at being brief. – [Chair Anderson] (laugh)
That doesn’t surprise me. (laughter) – If I could, Vice
President McMaster, I’d like to focus in and
ultimately get back to your presentation on student success. And badgering students to
sign up for their classes in the summer. I think is a good thing but
I’d like to further that a little bit. To prepare for that, so you
can think about student success and enhancing that, what
you do, what the ideas are, what the paths are? I’m gonna tell you
from my perspective, I don’t believe that a
26,500 dollar average debt for a student that graduates
and get a job in his or her field of study is all that bad. I don’t, when you consider
life long earning, when you consider the value
of education gets them. I don’t think it’s
that bad 26,500, it doesn’t appall me,
I’m not shocked by it. I am really shocked by
the students we have, which are numerous,
that don’t get a degree in four or five years, that don’t get a job
in their field of study and saddle them with that
26,500 or maybe even more because they might be on their fifth or
sixth or seventh year. That’s why I want to get
back to student success. But before that I
make this comment and this is just my
perception members, it doesn’t have to be you, yours. I don’t think we have
a student debt problem as much as we do have a
student tuition problem. I think it’s tuition
that drives the debt in fact you referred to that
Bob yourself when you said the chart that said Penn
State has the highest debt but immediately you said but of course they have
the highest tuition. You linked them
together right there. You said that yourself. And my sense it that during the 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, when we were increasing
tuition here at the University by 14, 12, 10, 7% and that’s
what we did in those eras, we were using students
as the ATM machine. We didn’t control spending
at the University, this is all colleges,
not just Minnesota’s, all college. We didn’t become more efficient,
we didn’t control spending we just used students
as the ATM machine, we just passed on the costs. This is my perception,
I might be wrong but I think that
is probably true. Now having said that,
Vice President McMaster, let’s get back to
student success. Badger them, get them
the degree in five years, I don’t care how
you badger them, or you didn’t like
the word badger. – [Vice President McMaster] Yes. (laugh) – But we gotta get
them the degree and we gotta get them a job. Can you help me more in what
we do in student success other than calling them in
the summer if they haven’t already signed up
for their classes? – Sure, yes. – [Chair Anderson] Vice
Provost McMaster, do you have a short answer for
that sort of question? – I do not have a short
answer, I’m sorry for that. (laugher) I will try to make it short, Chair Anderson and
Regent Sviggum. I agree with most
everything you’ve said, I will point out that
those significant increases in our tuition, parallel very
closely the disinvestment in state support
for this University. And so the University did
not have much of a choice if you wanted to
maintain the quality- – Mr. Chairman, which Bob,
paralleled the significant economic problem we had
after 9/11 and in 2007 and it paralleled
directly with that. And Bob education was different because General Mills and
Sviggum Farms became more efficient and Hennepin
County became more efficient at that time, we spent less. Maybe it wasn’t true
about the college. Continue. – So there are dozens and
dozens of initiatives around student success that
we have in place and it would take me
the next three hours to go through them and
I’d love to to do that but – [Regent Sviggum] I’d love some – One of them would be
around the messaging, around timely graduation from
the moment a student steps on this campus they’re
told that the expectation is they’re getting
out in four years, in fact at convocation,
a week ago, our President gave out
a tassel to the students reemphasizing that message. We look at advising, we’ve
increased the number advisors. Advisor training, they systems
that you just saw around amping up the knowledge
of financial wellness and financial literacy. Around the curriculum, reducing
degree credits in many of the majors so that
students could get out more expeditiously. Increasing the amount of
financial aid so that students are not having to work as much and can focus on their studies. Do you want me to continue? – I think student
success is the key to me, from my perception. – [Vice President McMaster]
You know, I agree completely, absolutely. – So may I, not take
the Chairman’s more time but talk more about
the different programs
at a later time? – [Chair Anderson] Okay
thank you very much. Regent Powell. – Thank you Chair Anderson and
thanks Vice Provost McMaster and Director Falkner. There’s no doubt in my mind
you guys, very focused on this, very committed to
managing student debt. This is an area where I disagree with my friend, Regent Sviggum. I think less debt is better, the lower we can
get it the better and so just because they’re gonna go on and they’re gonna carry and their family’s
gonna have that debt, and getting them out of here with the lowest amount
of debt possible should be our goal. And I appreciate all the stuff, all the work that
you’re doing here. The question I have, ya
know, a couple of point, first of all I think we’ve
sort of held it steady here over the last four or
five years, which is good, I mean that is good. I think we need a
goal and I think, so what do we want
to do over the next five years or ten years? Could we get it to 23 or 24 or what, and I think actually
being able to reduce it by eight, ten percent, would
be a tremendous positive for the University. To be able to position ourselves
as the Big Ten University with the graduates
who graduate with the least amount of debt, super,
super powerful message, within the state and
around the country. So I think it would be
really good if we had a goal. I think I’d be helpful,
I’d love to understand the literacy initiative and
how that might translate into concrete debt reduction. It looks like a smart
program and great program, I’d be great if we
could link it to, we think it’s gonna
be worth this much. You didn’t mention work study
but actually in your table, I mean, for those students
who come from families with low income, it’s actually
a big part of the whole package, it could be 10%. And so one of the
questions I have is, is there, is that an area
that we can press harder on? I mean, work study, I know
there can be federal funding, I’m just, I’m looking
for tactics ya know, I guess that can kind of help
us continue to drive this down and maybe grasping
at straws a bit but I appreciate
the work your doing. I think we need a
goal for what we want, what the next step is here and try to come up with a set
of initiatives and quantify them, that are gonna get
us to a particular place. So I don’t know that
a response is needed but I do appreciate
your focus here. – [Chair Anderson] Thank you,
you want to quick response? Go ahead sir. – Yes so Chair Anderson
and Regent Powell, all excellent points, I wish
I could comment on each one, I will comment on work study. Your model on work study
programs are critical for many reasons, one is
obviously reducing dept. Another is, it engages
students on the campus, they work in an office,
they work in a lab, they work for a department
and they get mentorship from the leaders in that
department, from the staff. And we find that students who
do work in that work study and who take advantage of it
have better graduation rates because they’re getting
that internal mentorship through engagement
on the campus. So if I could expand
that program by 100% that would be terrific, of
course those funds come from the federal government
and the state. – [Chair Anderson]
Thank you. Regent Rosha. – Thank you Mr. Chair and I’m
happy to be called right after the comments by Regent Powell, I think it’s a very nice setup. Based on time I
have some questions but I’m gonna just make a couple
observations at this moment and they go a little
bit to tactics. I agree when I think about
this as a critical topic, concerning the mission
of the University. As I fist say thiS I
thought well ya know, after the first three
slides we could stop and have a 50
minute conversation, this is just so much to
throw in, financial literacy, everyone of them is it’s
own very lengthy topic. And to the extent that we
can have these conversations through, as we go forward, I
think would be very helpful, mostly because we’re not
gonna come away from here with a sense of what the
Board’s perspective is. Affordability is effected
by virtually everything that comes before this Board, whether we talk to the
administrative costs and this is something
that my colleague Regent Sviggum has
spoken to before. Services to students as
the Student Representative, ya know we talked about what
are the things that we’re offering to students and that’s a very
complex conversation that all those things to add
to affordability questions. And then ya know whether we’re
admitting a full class of students per campus, per
college, per program. Ya know when we say, well want
to preserve an ACT profile so we’re gonna only
admit this many students, we’re affecting affordability
for every student that is on campus. I want to get a
little context on, particularly for
the class of 19, when we show the 15% graduation
rate back in the early 90’s it’s really not an apples
to apples comparison. We had General College,
University College, historically where we had, and we had extension classes, we had a lot of people
counted as head count students but they weren’t really
degree granting programs. So it’s a little bit
misleading but a prior Board, or a Board during that period,
decided we’re gonna work on graduation rate and I’m thrilled to see that
we have become among the most successful within our
peer group as a conference. And so the things that Vice
Provost McMaster talked about in advising, I mean these are
all really important things and I’m pleased to see
that we’re doing that. However now, when we move
into this tuition stuff, we talk about the tuition
versus scholarship gift aid, these numbers, the
395 verus the 191. It’s with a hat tip to Ben
Disraeli about statistics, it can be a little
bit misleading. If you take, if a student has
25,000 dollars in tuition, we’ll go to the state rate,
we’ll say 14,000 in tuition and they’re getting five
dollars in scholarship aid, then the next year, ya know
they’re at 21,000 dollars in tuition and they get
40 dollars in financial, ya know the financial
aid went way up, far more but the base was
so much lower that the impact is quiet different. So I want to make sure that
when we start moving back and forth between hard numbers
and percentages that we don’t sort of lose track of
what we’re talking about. I also note that when we were
looking at the data among the other institutions we were
talking about only freshman, entering freshman data. We know that we have a large
number of transfer students and so that’s gonna
have an impact and my estimation is a
lot of those students, were students that made
decisions to go to community colleges and other
schools for cost reasons and so they may end up
reflecting a greater
financial need. But I want to talk, when
we talk about financial aid and I want to push back a
little bit on the presumption that institutionally offered
financial aid is the key to addressing the
affordability problem. I think it actually adds to
the affordability problem, I think it’s challenge. When I think about the proper
public policy conversation about financial aid, we
have federal programs, directed at financial aid,
we have state programs and we have philanthropy. The foundation at one
point had initiative to try to increase the amount
of money being raised to endow scholarships
for students. That’s brilliant. Because it’s pay it
forward by voluntary means, people choosing to give
their own money to support the next generation. When we increase tuition and
then use part of that tuition to provide financial aid to
a certain group of students based on imperfect data, which is a generous
description I think. It’s pay it sideways by force and often times you’ll have
student A providing funds through tuition
that go to student B but in reality student A
who may be tied to a FAFSA but not receiving money from
home has fewer resources available, whereas student
B is now getting this but they have either access because it’s a cash
based income family or because they have other
financial aid opportunities. It’s a very inefficient
way of doing this and it also, it begs a certain question and you can understand why a
student today who faces that might be frustrated. Imagine driving to a
state park at 22 years old and when you go to pay your
fee they ask to see your parents tax records and based on what your parents
are earning they determine how much you have to pay
to use this public good of going to a state park. It probably ought
not be that way, that people ought to have
access to a public good on a balance basis. And it’ll be interesting cause
tonight they’ll be a debate among people who have a reasonable chance at
becoming president and I think the zeitgeist
among that population is that we should be
going for free collage but at the same time, we
don’t really focus on what the cost of the college is
as much as we talk about well how do we find this
financial aid opportunity. And I would say it, and I know that this is
somewhat of a harsh criticism but institutional financial
aid generated through tuition is, I’d call it the opioid
of higher education funding. It feels good, we can raise
more money by increasing tuition and then tell ourselves
it doesn’t hurt anybody because we’re gonna direct
some percentage of it to a few students
as financial aid but it eats away at the mission
of the University to provide and education to the, as
the original charter stated, the industrious
classes of the state. But it also keeps us from
trying to be as efficient as we possibly can in finding
those places where we can promote affordability by
keeping those costs down. So those are the comments
I wanted to make, Mr. Chair we didn’t really
have an opportunity, I don’t know how we
ever get at that, where we as a Board can
sort of raise our hand and say “we’re fine with this
increased tuition against this aid model.” Or if we want to start to
focus again on how to maintain affordability. And I’ll close with a quote
from Regent David Row, with whom I served
in a bygone era, he was the retired
president of the FLCAO, fairly well in touch with the
working classes of the state and his statement was clear
that the best financial aid is low tuition. And so from that standpoint
I think we should work really hard on identifying how
we can promote that. That value, not suggest that
we’re not really doing harm because we have some nugget
of financial aid to a small group of students. Thank you Mr. Chair. – Thank you. Apologize for my time
management skills up here but we have Regent Her
and Regent Mayeron, Regent Kenyanya just
signed up, I’m sorry. But Regent Her and
Regent Mayeron, you
have about 90 seconds each for a comments
and then we’re gonna, we have one more presentation
and we have to catch a bus at noon just so my
colleagues know that. And it’s the only
bus so Regent Her. (laugh) – Thank you, thank
you Mr. Chair. My question is regard on
data and I didn’t see it and hopefully it exists but I would like to
see it in the future and it goes around the
indebtedness and who around low income, broken down by income,
race and gender. That would inform my thinking
about strategy on what we need to do in terms
of targeting messaging. Thank you. – [Chair Anderson] Do you
have an answer for that or we’re just gonna. – Chair Anderson and Regent
Her we certainly can get those desegregated data by race,
ethnicity, income level, we can slice and
dice this many ways. – [Chair Anderson]
Regent Mayeron. – Mine had to do
with the data as well and that is a lot of the focus
here is on Twin Cities data. Do we have comparable data
for the other campuses that is not part of the presentation
and generally how does it compare to the stature giving
us on the Twin City data, does it mirror it, is it
different, are there anomalies? – Regent Anderson,
Regent Mayeron. If you looked at
the indebtedness, we actually do have some
extra slides in here on the system campuses that we’re
not gonna be able to get to. There are some differences, so for instance Duluth tends
to be a little higher on debt. In terms of the total
amount of gift aid, that varies
significantly by campus. So there is a story
there we could tell and we’d have to come
back with the similar data for all the system campuses. For every piece of
data you saw today we have it for the
system campuses as well. – [Chair Anderson] Thank you. Regent Kenyanya do you have
something on our table? – Yeah I believe my colleagues
left about 60 of their seconds on the table
so I’m gonna use them. I’ll switch my questions to
comments and I’ll be brief. One was about, that’s actually
the slide we have up now. Often when we’re
talking about costs, we’re talking about the
higher education index, I believe that makes total
sense when we’re talking about from the University’s
perspectives, our costs and whatnot. But it never makes sense to
me for that to be what we’re looking at from the family
and student perspective because that’s not
the world they live, and that’s not the inflation
and cost that they’re using. So just a comment
on that and then Regent Mayeron, led
right to my next point and Regent Sviggum’s comments
and there’s a lot of them but one that made sense is that. (laughter from Regents) Regent Sviggum’s said that
he’s more worried about the student that leaves with
26,000 and not with a degree right? And without a degree. And then honed in
on graduation rates and I was gonna say that
I would love if this Board really made it an initiative
and a priority to have our system campus rates and
graduation rates mirror the Twin Cities Campus. And I know that some of
them are low but comparable to their peers. But we could, I’d still be
a great goal of ours to say we still want to
see those higher. And I’m sure it’s already
being worked towards but if this Board
could support that. – So thank you. I
have a lot of ideas, a lot of questions too but
there’s just not gonna be time. But one thing I
would like to ask and I think I know the answer, our three year graduation
rate, percentage wise, is growing even faster than
our four year graduation rate, is that a fair statement? And if so we should be doing
everything we can to let kids graduate in the
most timely fashion because you did say five years, year borrowing goes
up, debt goes up. I would expect three years
that it’s conversely true that if paid less, borrowing
goes down, debt goes down, fair statement? – Chair Anderson, that’s
a very fair statement. It looks as though,
based on early data, the three year graduation
rate for the most recent class is gonna be eight percent. – Terrific, thank you very much, and I, just a couple years
ago it was about three percent so thank you very much. We’re gonna be on to
our next presentation. Thanks, thank you. – Our next presentation
is gonna be about outreach and it’s gonna be about outreach
and it’s gonna include the Bell Museum and Glensheen
and I think Provost Hanson are you gonna tee
this up for us? – Just a couple words,
thank you Chair Anderson. The Board has expressed a clear
interest in looking at all aspects of the University’s
Outreach Mission and we’ll be doing that over
the course of a number of meetings but today you have
the opportunity for discussion with and about two units that
engage primarily and precisely with Minnesota outreach. Hear first from Danial
Hartman who is the Director of Glensheen Museum in Duluth and after that short
presentation, we’ll hear from Denise Young, Executive
Director of the Bell Museum in Saint Paul and then Daniel and Denise will
take your questions. – Thank you very much and
I’m just gonna remind you that you kind of heard
me say in jest that our bus leaves at noon
and that is true so, (members laugh) anything you can do, I mean it’s important stuff but I just want you to
be cognizant of that cause our Regents do like to
ask questions to probe a little bit more, you can understand. Thank you very much and I guess it’s Director
Hartman, going first. Thank you very much, go ahead. – Thank you Chair Anderson
and Board of Regents for allowing us this
opportunity to speak. This is something we
we frost at Glensheen, we’re just kind of excited
to talk about this. And several of you in the room,
we’ve talked to you before but just thank you
for the opportunity. So I’m gonna go right
into our first slide and I want to point
out to you that, she did a phenomenally
better job than me at making her
slides look better. My graph designers
went back to class so I apologize for that. (members laugh) So this is Glensheen, a 39
room mansion on the shore of Lake Superior. It’s this beautiful
12 acre property but a lot of people don’t
realize it’s a House Museum. People think of it as an
attraction, it is a museum, in fact House Museum are the
number one type of museum in the country. 40 percent of all museums
are House Museums. In Minnesota alone there
are 100 plus in our state. But what I love about
House Museums is that, I joke that we’re
the museum buffet because you have history,
you have horticulture, you have art history, you
have a wide variety of things, the different academic
departments of the
University utilize all the time. And so that’s what I love
about us House Museums and this picture behind
you is Meadow Brook Hall, which is actually part of the University of
Oakland in Michigan. So it’s actually a House
Museum that’s actually much larger than ours but I will say, we have
triple their attendance, just saying. (colleague laughs) So I’m also, to break a little
bit about the turn around we’ve had at Glensheen. House Museums across the
country have been on this death spiral since 1976. And I’m proud to say
that from 2013 to now, we have more than doubled
our Glensheen attendance. We have reversed this really
negative trend nationally. And I’m super proud that we
even beat our record year of 1981 which I’ll be honest, I thought wasn’t even possible. And so I think that’s
just kind of a cool thing that we should be proud
of as a University that we own this House Museum
that really bopped the whole national trend. And just to show that we
didn’t fluff the numbers this is our tour
ticket sale receipts. So in 2013 it was around
700 thousand and this last fiscal year it’s 1.7 million. And so you can talk what you
want about tour attendance this is just straight up math,
this is our ticket sales. And so this has had a
very positive impact on Glensheen’s bottom line, we’ve actually put, nearly
half a million dollars of money back into the
property itself, just out of ticket sales. And this has been a fun
thing to talk about. And on that same note, what’s
really unique about Glensheen, compared to most museums,
not just in the U of M but frankly in general is
that it’s almost entirely paid for operationally
by ticket sales. I mean we only get 50 thousand
dollars a year of operational support from the University. Which is far less than the vast majority of
other U of M museums. And so what I like to say is
that we are a very high ROI, when you consider how many
visitors we have per year, how much faculty used Glensheen, how much University events
take place at Glensheen and I think most importantly and I’ll talk about this later, how many students use Glensheen. And so that’s why I, it’s just something
I like to talk about. But you know, in the end,
why does Glensheen matter? First, the whole place is
built off of mining money developed by Chester Congdon and so it really represents
this Minnesota legacy connected to mining. Chester is the one in the
legislature who passes the bill to fund the University of
Minnesota to do research on this thing we call taconite I mean, so we are just
integral to that story and everyone else is telling
that story about Glensheen. And then I think the thing
frankly our visitors connect to and a lot of faculty and
staff connect to is the Minnesota artists
connected to Glensheen. So for example, in this room
the art glass is done by the Minneapolis Handicraft Guild. The room is designed
by John Bradsury, this is some of the
best interior designers
in our state’s history and people really
get into this history and frankly they just love the
natural beauty of this room. And they love when they hear
that it’s done by Minnesotans. So that’s what’s so great about
Glensheen is the architect is Minnesotan, the interior
designers are Minnesotan, it is a Minnesota House Museum. A lot of these other, giant
mansions in Minnesota are built by designers from the East
coast or the West coast, not Glensheen, it represents
the best of Minnesota architecture and design at
the turn of the century. So beyond the tour, which
I do want to point out, we see 140 thousand visitors
just on the tour alone that makes us the most visited
House Museum in the mid west. We actually beat out Chicago
two years ago as the most visited House
Museum in that area. Which we’re pretty proud
of, the Hill House, in the Twin Cities has only
around 60 thousand visitors, so it really gives you an idea
of how popular Glensheen is with the state of Minnesota. We have visitors from every
legislative area in the entire state of Minnesota which is
probably why it’s so popular at the legislature is,
everyone knows about it. And I think this is
kind of a bad thing but only five percent of my
visitors actually come from the Duluth area. The lions share of them are
actually from the Twin Cities metro area and then
Southern Minnesota. And so we really have a really
proud big state wide use. Now beyond the tour, because the tour is so popular, these other things get forgotten and right now we are an
anchor that’s part of the UMD Museum Studies Program. Every time they go and travel,
we are one of the places that they visit. When it comes to Horticulture, the Extension Service has been
using our vegetable garden as a trial bed for
a number of years. And so they’ll do a
trial plants at Glensheen and then they do a trail
plants up on top of the hill just to see what changes
because there’s a high moisture content because of the lake, the moisture coming
off of the lake. So I joke about
this but it’s true. Our corn, is juicier. (laugh) No Joke. But also in recent years,
we’ve begun experimenting with the U of M
Horticulture Department and so we have the
only Lena roses. Our rose garden is
all U of M roses now. Which I think is a kind of
a cool way to show off our U of M connection in a
lot of different ways. And beyond that, we’ve
had UROP’s at Glensheen, since I can remember. We had a student who’s a graphic
designer, redo one of our wallpapers and when we go back
to the original wall cover, we’ll use her graphic
design work to do that work. And I’m gonna point out that
the reason I am here today is my senior directed research
as a student at UMD was the grounds of Glensheen and that was my UROP
project my senior year. And so I am directly
connected to this undergraduate research as well, it’s what we use today
as our grounds tour. And then also, we
are one of the most used University properties. The week I was putting
this presentation together we had an English Department,
a Biology Department and a Physics Department
all utilizing Glensheen. We have 50 plus University
Departments using us a year. Also Glensheen as of late
has become a community space, so we have these concerts
here, on the lake. We have a winter village
event, our winter village event brought in 20 thousand
people in two days. But where I want to end is this, what I think really speaks
the most to Glensheen is that we get 1,300 students,
UMD students a year who tour Glensheen for fun. They don’t tour us because
their professor tells them to, they come because they want
to and that shows the raw, kind of organic
interest in this place, that I think sometimes
people view negatively, that “oh it’s an attraction.” No that just shows you how
great of a museum space it is and why for the last three
years, Glensheen’s been called the best
museum in Duluth, according to the
Duluth News Tribune. We just won it
like two weeks ago. But anyways, with further ado, that’ll be my speech
and once again, thank you to the
Board of Regents and Chair Anderson for
allowing this opportunity, – Terrific, we’re gonna
have Director Young of the Bell Museum go and then
we’re gonna ask for questions. Director Young, great to
have you here, I must admit I did see your
portable planetarium, I don’t know if that’s
what it’s called but it was in the gym at
Alec Area High School, I know you were up there
that day and they’re were lines of people to go into it. Students and people so
it’s fun to see you again and thanks for
bringing it up there. – Absolutely, thank you. Thank you Chair Anderson and
members of the committee. Thank you for this opportunity,
it has been a very exciting time as many of you know,
with the Bell Museum, over the last years and
particularly this last year. And I will share some
of that with you, I also wanted to just let you know,
I’m gonna approach outreach and impact from a variety
of different perspectives and I’m gonna go fast
and so here we go. (laughter among committee) I want to start with a
little bit of background. The Bell Museum started in 1872, when the legislature called for a state museum of
natural history that would collect, preserve, interpret
and tell the story of the rich bio-diversity of Minnesota. And at that time said that
the museum would be here at the University of Minnesota. So for almost 150 years the
Bell Museum has been active. We are proud that
CFANS is our home base. CFANS has a strong and historic
commitment to research, teaching in public outreach and we feel like we
fit in well there. The Bell Museum holds, this
is the part most people don’t know about the Bell Museum,
we hold 1.2 million biological specimens of plant and animal
life in Minnesota and beyond. We have many curators who are
tenure track faculty member who also hold curatorial
appointment at the Bell Museum. And so all of the things
that come with tenure track faculty members, graduate
students, research agendas, undergraduates, teaching,
happen through the Bell Museum. Our curators care for and add
to and importantly conduct research using our
collections on topics such as biodiversity, plant animal
environment relationships over time, climate change,
invasive species and more. Our collections are used here
at the University of Minnesota they are in use by
academics globally, museum curators globally, and also state and
federal agencies. So we have regular work with the Department of Natural
Resources here in this state, Minnesota Pollution
Control Agency and others. And so as we are, as many museums are digitizing their
collections, we are as well. And when we digitize our
collections, we make them more and more accessible to people
such as school children and teachers. So I wanted to just start by
saying, our science is a really big part of the outreach
of the Bell Museum. Moving on to public education, (cough) as many of you know, our new
facility opened just over a year ago in July of 2018. I’m proud to report that our
first year on site attendance was nearly 231
thousand visitors, that is up from an average
of about 38 thousand visitors in our previous location. So significant increase there. The docket materials you
have explain a little more about who those 231
thousand people are and where they come
from, broadly, on a map. I also wanted to share that
our household memberships have increased substantially. When you become a member
of a place like the Bell House Museum your showing
a deeper level of commitment to the mission. Our household memberships moved
from 700 household members before we opened
to over 68 hundred and what I find significant about that is about
65% of our household members have no prior relationship to
the University of Minnesota. So they are not alums,
they are not donors. And so we are finding that the
Bell Museum is an entry point for people who may not
have had any other reason or opportunity to engage
with the University. Just drilling a little deeper
about the 231 thousand, 25 thousand of our visitors
this past year were school children attending
on a field trip. It is not lost on us
at the Bell Museum, that when they are coming
to visit the museum, they are coming to visit
the University of Minnesota. This allows us to
double our impact. Perhaps these students who
are coming are the next golden gophers, we don’t know. But they’re certainly the
next generation workforce and residents of our state
who will learn to understand the value of the
University to our state. I’ve spent a lot of time
talking with teachers over the last year, one of them
told me after a field trip that she felt like our new
Bell Museum building was, and these are her words,
“providing a warm embrace to her and her students”, that
that’s what the University did with the new Bell Museum. We work very closely with
school districts to provide opportunities that support and
extend the required science curriculum in the classroom
and we do that in ways, and with materials that teachers
just don’t have access to in their schools. Students while they’re here
are also interacting with researchers, visiting labs,
really getting to see the University from the inside out. And as a former
classroom teacher myself, I’m a proud
kindergarten teacher, I understand the value of these experiences on
the trajectories in life, experiences of children. Those should not
be underestimated, these are very
powerful experiences. Moving on to life long learners,
the Bell Museum is about we say, “Lifelong, life-wide
and life-deep learning.” There are different purposes
as we all know to learning at different phases and
stages of our lives. Sometimes it is to prepare
for a career, sometimes it’s to pursue a passion, or to
solve a problem we’re having in our lives, or to more fully
connect with our community and our democracy. We have seen an explosion
of family visitors at the Bell Museum over the last year. And in particular,
multi-generational families so grandparents, parents
and children as in
this picture here. What we are learning
about family visitors is in talking with the, is that they’re using
the Bell Museum to pass on the values and principals
that we hold dear in Minnesota. Those are sometimes, clean
water, care for the environment, respect for nature, just as
important as fostering a love for learning, as a value
that we hold dear hear. And I should also say, we’re
seeing a lot of adult only visitors to the museum so
adults coming on their own or as part of groups with
community education and such. University students, we
are thrilled with the level of University
students at the museum. We employ about 115
students at the Bell Museum such as Amina, they of course
are from across Minnesota and other places. They’re the first people
you see when you walk into the Museum. They’re at our ticket desk, their giving the tours but they’re also
working back of house, helping with fundraising,
marketing, exhibit
design, retail, merchandising and more. They are putting what they
learn in their classrooms to practical use in a real and
tangible ways at the Museum. I’m going to, in the
interest of time, just talk a little bit
about where we’re headed. We are, we’re up and running,
things are going well at the new Bell Museum
and we are feeling, we’re filling needs
in our community here but our staff and our advisory
board and our volunteers and others are
extremely interested
in extending our reach across the state. We’re the state’s Natural
History Museum, we work here at the University of
Minnesota, Statewide System and are very proud of that and want to leverage the
resources of the new museum to serve the entire state. So we have engaged in some
strategic planning around statewide reach that leverages
our strengths and core competencies, meets real needs,
can be financially viable and sustainable and we’ve
been working very closely with the talented students from the Carlson School of
Business to help us develop a framework and a strategy
for statewide reach. Chair Anderson mentioned the
exploridum portable planetarium as one thing that we
already do that sort of, 15 thousand people annually
but our goal is to serve more people in greater
Minnesota than we do on site and in the Twin Cities, and we’ve set that goal at
about half a million people a year, we hope to get
there within five years. So with that, I think we’re happy
to answer questions. – [Chair Anderson] Terrific. Great presentations.
– Thank you, thank you very much. – It’s kinda funny ya know, people have accused me of my
mind working in different ways. I heard Director Hartman talk
about mining and I thought I heard Regent McMillan start
sharing and sure enough, (committee laughter) he is gonna be asking a
questions and the other thing I heard that I had to chuckle
because I’m gonna use this line when I go home,
Executive Director Young, mentioned that the membership
brings a deeper level of commitment to people, I’m going to use that line on
my wife, well why I’m going to the golf course so often because now I have a
deeper level of commitment. – You do. Yes. – Let’s start with
Regent McMillan, I
guess you want to ask a question or have a comment. – [Regent McMillan] Thank
you Regent Anderson, and I did perk up on my couch side seat here as Director Hartman was speaking but first of all, I’ll start with a comment
on Director Young’s report. I had the opportunity about
three weeks ago to attend the open house at the North Central
Research and Outreach Center in Grand Rapids just about
50 miles from where I live and I want to commend Denise
and her team on jumping in and being part of that event. And the thing that I want to
highlight the most is just the fact that getting out
into upstate Minnesota and whether you’re bringing
along a portable planetarium which I laid on the floor of
and enjoyed the show immensely, or any other of these activities
just helping Minnesotans understand that we are a state
wide institution and that our reach is that broad and people
just are stunned by that just like they are when
they drive down London road and see the block
M hanging there on the side of the Glensheen
Mansion and go, “Oh I didn’t know that was part
of the University.” So anyway, one more
comment on Glensheen and it’s mission and then a question
for Director Hartman. The comment is this and thank
you so much for bringing up the connection between, between Mr. Congdon and mining and taconite specifically
and some of you on the Board have heard me talk
about this before but I know many Regents struggle
with the mission related piece of Glensheen
and how does it fit. I think Director Hartman has
done a great job of showing you many different ways but for
me it’s not even a question of fit with mission. Without Chester Congdon, and
I’m not making too big of a stretch here,
historians can check, we may not have ever had any
of the money that came from the conversion of royalties
into permanent University fund money if he
hadn’t intervened and
made sure that didn’t all become Eastern
United States money and Dan Hartman can give
you that whole history. What’s the point?
That translates to
have work by Congdon, That investment,
that intervention, when the Rockefellers are
trying to take that money to different parts
of the country, into almost half of our
permanent University
fund endowment and almost half of the
corpus for the money that Stewart Mason manages for us, I’m not talking about UMF
money, I’m talking about the 1.3 billion that we hold
in our own endowment and something close to 50%
of that, it’s closer to 45, haven’t asked lately but
it’s a very big number, all comes from permanent
University money funds, and almost all of that
comes from iron ore. So I just think to me that
solidifies the question of what’s the connection of
this place where Chester Congdon lived to our overall mission. Here’s the question, thanks for indulging me
there Chair Anderson. Director Hartman what do you see as the biggest opportunity coming your way thinking
about ya know, challenges and opportunities but I’m
really interested in what’s the biggest thing coming in the
next year or two for you and congratulations in spades
to the work you’ve done. – [Chair Anderson] Thank
you Regent McMillan and Director Hartman is here
and he’ll answer that question. I believe you heard it. – Thank you Chair Anderson
and Regent McMillan, and thank you for all
of your complementary language as well. I think I’m kind of excited
for I think Glensheen’s next chapter, I think we’ve really
connected with the visitation side and we’ll continue
to go down that road but the part that’s growing
is that University connection and we’ve really only just
begun to start to reach out to the different departments
of the University System Wide. For Example we haven’t
really reached out yet to the University of Minnesota’s
Architecture Program yet, they would be a natural
fit with Glensheen. We have just begun a
relationship with the U of M Horticulture Department
and that’s been already been giving back in spades
over the last two years. And ya know, part of the reason
it’s hard for us to do that as our entire staffing right
now is dedicated to making sure the tour model works
cause frankly all of our money is based off of ticket sales. And so I think if there’s
ever a next potential chapter or what if situation
for Glensheen is, we currently don’t have
an educator on staff, we currently don’t have a
development officer on staff because both of those
roles aren’t connected to ticket sale revenue which ya
know that’s the only way I pay for those positions. And so I think there’s always
that what if situation, what if Glensheen becomes
that normal museum of the University of Minnesota where
we have an educator on staff who has the time to reach out
to all this different academic departments and we have
this, I would call, this next chapter
of involvement. And I’m kind of excited
for that and I will say, it’s already happening cause
as Glensheen’s gained in popularity, departments
get to hear about it. So for example the Large Lakes
Observatory wrote a grant, it is now gonna put a weather
station on the boat house of Glensheen so that they can
watch the weather patterns if they’re going
across Lake Superior. They want to put a, I
apologize, I’m not a scientist, I’m not gonna say
this word correctly, but like an erosion monitor
on the bottom of Lake Superior so that they can see what’s
going on on the lake and because Glensheen has a
historic pier and there’s a pipe that goes out through the pier, they’re gonna put it through
the pipe out into the lake. I apologize, it sounds
so informal but I
am not a scientist. But that’s just a good example
of some of the small things that are happening because
of this property in site. We have a designated trout
stream on the property, that’s a whole other
conversation that’s going on in different circles
and so there’s, when people think of Glensheen
they think of the mansion but honestly the vast majority
of academic uses haven’t been mansion related. We had a graduate student,
Emily Ellingson who did research on the eastern hemlock
because Glensheen is far north as you’re gonna find
this eastern hemlock, cause Chester brought
it 100 years ago. It’s not suppose to be there. But it’s just part of
the legacy at Glensheen. – [Chair Anderson]
Thank you, thank you. Regent Beeson. – Thank you Mr. Chair,
thank you presenters, Director Hartman, you’ve
done the real men’s duty on the mansion and the
numbers speak for themselves. And I had a chance to go up
there in July and tour it again. And the practical approach
you’re taking just continually improving, this is
a forever process, that relates to the house and I’m just very
very impressed. Yesterday I took a tour and
Chair McMillan talked about our research and
outreach centers, I just encourage
colleagues to get out and visit all of them during
your term on the Board. The one I went to yesterday
is in the metro area, on the outskirts up in Isanti
Anoka county and that’s Ceder Creek Reserve,
really important work. The other museums in the
system are doing important work they’re not as high profile
but I learned something every time. And this summer I had
a chance up to Itasca, and that had been many many
years since I’d done that. Question I wanted to
ask Director Young, I remember when this building
was financed from the state there was concern
about the operating, the lack of operating
support that we, accompanied the capital money and I can only imagine what
the numbers look like so are you going to be, once you normalize operations
are you gonna be able to self finance the operations
and have a surplus so that you can look at expanding
programming or the building? Or what’s the money side of
this looking like at this point? – Executive Director Young? – Yeah, Chair Anderson
and Regent Beeson, thank you for that question. We were able to secure all of
the funding to complete the project without any debt
which was incredible. So it was a 79.2 million
dollar total project budget including the 51 and a
half million from the state and then University support
of six million dollars and then we raised
approximately 20 million dollars to open the museum. We’re in a state now where
we are balanced budget, our, of course earn revenue
went up, we’ve diversified our funding streams,
earned revenue. We do have fundraising
professionals on our staff who are working on
philanthropic support as well and we have grant funding so
part of our research is funded through grants. And part of our education
program’s funded through grants as well so we are starting
to save for our future. That is an important priority
for me as someone who knows that places like museums enjoy, I guess, a lot of love and have wear and tear over
time and need to be constantly refreshed so that people will
continue to come back to them. And so we’re in a
good place right now and of course we have
University support as well. – [Regent Beeson] Thank you. – [Chair Anderson] That answers
the question. Regent Hsu. – Thank you Chair Anderson, thank you Directors
Hartman and Young. You both have been
really, great job, one with a really old building, one with a really new building but really a reboot
of an old museum. I just had a couple questions. Ya know I did attend the
Glensheen Gale of this year, I didn’t get on the, (cough) apparently did, did not get
in line early enough to be on the coveted scotch tour but I think Regent
McMillan was on that. (laugh) But I think everything
is happening that we thought would happen. The one thing about
the money that was I guess in our budget a couple
years ago that had to have a match or whatever, I still
don’t really understand how that works but could you
give me an understanding of, yeah give all of us an
idea of the matching funds and whether or not
you’ve been able to use any of those funds and if
so what have you used it on? (phone feedback) And then before you go on that
I’m just gonna ask the other question just so I
don’t get cut off. So Director Young, or
Executive Director Young, the next phase, you didn’t talk about what,
if there was a phase two but originally there was a
phase two of the Bell Museum and I was just wondering kinda what the planning on that was? – Director Young and
then Director Hartman, the question about,
does the state match, is that what that’s about? And if you have any information
on that that’s great and if you don’t you
can follow up offline but I don’t know, don’t
want to put you on the spot but you probably do know. Director Young, you want to
answer his question first? – Sure, sure Chair
Anderson and Regent Hsu, are you referring to the
property just south of the Bell? – [Regent Hsu] Yes, yes. – Okay so there is
not a current plan, it’s something we would be
interested in talking about. We have enjoyed well more
success than we thought we would and expected with our business
plan and it just continues to go really well, I think expansion would be
a really great thing for us to be thinking, smart thing
for us to be thinking about. But as of yet we’ve not
had those conversations. So thank you. – [Chair Anderson]
And Director Hartman, about the matching funds. – Thank you Chair
Anderson and Regent Hsu, I’ll give kind of a quick
synopsis or an update on this, I’m proud to say we
just recently finished
the feasibility study to the four million
match and I’m happy to say the four million match occurred
through the legislature of the state of Minnesota. And so the University
of Minnesota Foundation and members of the University
of Minnesota Duluth staff are now strategizing to kind
of give more of a kick off, now to actually start the
fundraising now that the feasibility study is done. – [Regent Hsu] Okay, thank you. – Regent Kenyanya. – Thank you very
much Chair Anderson, thank you presenters for
taking time and sharing about these two museums with us. I’d be remise not to point
out that Director Hartman and I are both
president emeriti of the UMD Student Association. So just fun little
connection there. I want to, this summer at
our retreat we spent a lot of time talking about outreach and we all had different
ideas, not competing but ya know certainly different
ideas of what that is. And one of our priorities
is to clearly define, articulate and promote the
University’s outreach mission and develop a system wide plan to guide and
measure it’s impact. And these entities both
fit in that so well if we could go to slide 123, real quick, no? Do you have control? I’m sorry. – [Director Hartman]
What’s it look like? – Oh it’s the picture of the
people at the planetarium, looking up at the planetarium. – [Director Hartman] That’s it. – Right there, I mean, that looks like the outreach
mission to me honestly, being able to bring people
in from the community and then the picture at
Glensheen with all the people, in the crowd. But I just wanted to point
out how I think this fits in our outreach mission and it’s certainly an
opportunity to bring people in for what the entities are but
then go on to tell the story of the other things we’re
doing in our teaching and our research mission. And I think that just
speaks to how good our staff and committee leadership is
at putting this stuff together to align with our plan. But thank you for your time
and for the presentation. – Thank you and that is an
interesting fact about the both the president of
Meriti of the student union, student group up there? Can I ask you what
year Director Hartman? – Chair Anderson, absolutely, Student Body
President 2003, 2004. – Terrific, terrific, thank you. Regent Powell. – Thanks Chair Anderson, both
of these are really stunning outreach successes so
congratulations to both of you and Regent Beeson asked
the question on finances so I’m gonna yield. – [Chair Anderson] Okay. Regent Rosha you want
to take us home here and we’ll get to
the consent agenda? – Sure Mr. Chair, thank you and I want to think the
Provost for setting this up although I would point out
that, you put two of the crown jewels in our outreach
mission in front of us so it’s a, obviously a positive
step to talk about these along with arboretum, these are
really critically important. And Director Young,
congratulations on
an amazing roll out in, again success
beyond our expectations and our expectations
where significant. And for Director Hartman,
it’s nice to be able to talk about Glensheen in
those glowing terms because it wasn’t that
long ago that ya know, not long ago at all that
we were talking about the capacity for it to continue
to help us in our outreach mission and ya know how we
were gonna take care of this. And with your robust
numbers I would suggest that you’re dangerously close to
being tapped to come down to our athletic department
and ticket sales, (laughter) assign you to TCF perhaps. But maybe that will
be Regent Kenyanya, fits that Student Body,
UMD president magic, well set him to that assignment. But one quick question and I
think the Bell Museum has this in tremendous form, putting
on my John Q public hat, we just did a trip
out to Mount Rushmore, where some of the historic
portions of it were maybe not of great interest to our ten,
eight and now six year old kids. They had a program for
a junior ranger thing and set the kids out on that
and they got really engaged. Do you have programs
at Glensheen to
sort of make it come alive for youth like that? Cause obviously these will be
lifetime memories that they’ll have of that attraction. I’m just wondering whether
we have something already in place and what could be
developed in that regard for Glensheen? – [Chair Anderson]
Director Hartman. – Chair Anderson and Regent, absolutely and we are continuing to look
for more ways to do this. So the most successful thing
honestly, probably worth about 15 to 20 thousand of our
visitor bump a couple years ago, is we invented this thing
called the treasure book, and the treasure book identifies
two items in each room where the kids have like an
eye spy game in each of the rooms of the mansion and then when they see the item, it then tells them the
history of that item. And so it’s kinda funny
cause I’ll be honest, for a while a lot of kids
didn’t enjoy the place and so the parents would kind
of drag their kids through and now the opposite
problems occur, where the kids want to
find every single item and mom and dad want to
get out of the house. (laughter) And so, I just think it’s
been kinda fun to see how that curb has changed. We also do little, you
can call them gimicks, but in October, we’ll hide
pumpkins throughout the house as well as part of that way
to keep kids entertained. I have four kids under eight
and so I will say that they are privately my inspiration
for ideas at times. But 100% when the whole family
enjoys the museum experience you know they’re gonna come
back and they’re gonna learn a lot more through
that process as well. Thank you. – Thank you.
– Thank you very much, thank you both of
you for being here and thank you for
what you do everyday for the people of the
state of Minnesota. So thank you very much. – [Director Hartman]
Thank you Chair Anderson. – We’re gonna get now
to the consent report, the consent agenda. I just happened to look and I had it on here
on what is on there. We’re gonna have a request
for approval of new academic programs, we heard
today how they are vetted. We’re gonna have a request
for approval of change academic programs, a request
for approval of discontinued academic programs and request
for conferral of tenure for outside hires. In just a moment I’ll ask
Provost Hanson to go into more detail on that but before I do, could I get a motion
and second for that? – [Board Member] Second. – [Regent Beeson] Second. – Second? Okay Provost Hanson,
anything you want to explain about that role? – Thank you Chair Anderson
and I know we’re in a hurry so I’ll just highlight
a couple of things that, on the new programs. The School of Public Health is
creating a post-bachelorette certificate in American Indian
Public Health and Wellness. And the Carlson School is
creating an undergraduate minor in strategic management and
that’s gonna be useful to a lot of students who aren’t
in the Carlson School, cause it can be added
to other majors. One thing else I want to
highlight is a new partnership between South Dakota
State University and the College of
Veterinary Medicine on the Twin Cities campus. A transfer agreement is being
formalized that will allow up to 20 students per cohort
to transfer into the DVM degree program on completion
of a masters degree from SDSU. Program addresses regional
need for veterinarians who provide services
for large animals, cattle, swine and
horses in rural areas and that is ya know, there’s a lot of demand
for the vet school but not always a lot of demand
for those large animal vet, there’s demand for
it but there’s not
often a lot of student coming in so it’s important
to have that rural connection. The program does align
with pathways for students transferring from other
veterinarian medicine programs. And it’s not going to
displace other students seeking traditional admission because what we’re swapping
out is something that was a pathway coming from, for Caribbean students to our vet school. So want to mention that and then it’s very important that a degree conferral
for seven recent highers, those are tenure conferral’s
of people who’ve been hired in. So the brief bios are
in your materials. – Thank you Provost Hanson, any questions from
my Regent colleagues on the consent agenda? If not there’s a motion
and second on the table, all those in favor of
approving the consent agenda, signify by saying I. – [All Committee] I. – Opposed? (gravel pounds) Motion carries. Provost Hanson do you have
any information items for us? – No.
– Do you want to talk? No. Okay so don’t leave yet I do have a notice
from Regent Powell here that, from our Chairman, it says this is
for the colleagues. “I’d like to remind my
colleagues that immediately following our meetings we’ll
be heading out for lunch in an interactive
learning opportunity. We’re gonna be boarding a bus,” See I told ya. and going to the Cancer
and Cardiovascular Research Building to learn about mapping
of the zebra muscle genome for researchers from the
Genomics Center and the Aquatic Invasive Species
Research Center. Please take a short
break if you need one and Regent Sviggum we did
conclude seven minutes early. Then head to the first
floor to meet the bus at oak tree entrance
to the building. If you have questions,
please ask the Board Staff.” With that we are adjourned. (gravel bags) (beep)