University of California, Berkeley’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

University of California, Berkeley’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

September 7, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


(light music) – We’ve had a 6.0 magnitude earthquake near the Fremont area. EOC is fully activated. There has been widespread damage across campus. All bridges and train lines are down. Classes are cancelled and the campus is closed. The chancellor has declared a state of emergency, which will allow coordination with regional and state agencies. Any questions? All right, guys. Take your stations and let’s go. (light music) In an emergency situation, things can just be chaos in general. Everyone is looking for some answer to “What’s the plan?” – You need to facilitate a coordinated response to emergency. If you have any hope of it being successful, it needs to be coordinated. – The Emergency Operation Center, or the EOC, is a single physical location, which allows experts from across the campus dealing with emergency response to gather together to manage the response, to support the efforts in the field, and to coordinate actions. – We have received new information that the earthquake was actually a 6.8 earthquake. – [Voiceover] Three buildings have either been collapsed or significant debris. – We are practicing today for a 6.8 earthquake. That is, there’s a high probability that that could in fact happen right here. Once the EOC is activated, we immediately have what’s called a quick start meeting, and immediately then identify initial objectives that we are going to be focused on. – The main thing we need to be doing is coming up with our initial objectives. We need to do that within a period of about 10 minutes here. The main objectives is save lives, protect public safety. Everything they do needs to be in that context then. – The field units start filtering in information about damage to buildings, possible chemical spills, and the EOC triages a lot of that information. – We need to figure out tonight can people sleep in the residence halls. Human nature is if you have policy issues before you and you have some immediate human life safety issues, your attention gets drawn naturally to those operational issues. We know the transportation network is messed up right now. So we’ve got to look at sheltering people here. Whether we’re evacuating the campus or gonna keep people sheltered in place. These are important policy-level questions that simply must be addressed by people who aren’t bogged down in all the operational issues and priority setting. It’s important that there be communication update to the office of the president, and that’s a role of the crisis management team. So could you make sure that that happens. Okay, folks, we’re going to gather now in the other room again for an initial incident briefing. All right? So wrap up what you’re doing and let’s head over to the other room. Again, I wanna thank you all for being here and for working as a team. This is a huge event for the campus and for the whole region. There is a lot of chaos out there. What’s important is that we all work as a team. – So our first objective is to save lives and protect public safety. Our second one is to conduct damage assessment of campus buildings and the belt environment. Our third objective is to conduct assessment of campus communications and IT infrastructure. Our fourth objective is to communicate with and keep campus community and general public informed. – This is the place where information from all across the campus and elsewhere, Richmond Field Station and whatnot, is shared. So as you learn information, be sure to share it with your colleagues who may need to know that information. All right? Back to your stations then. Let’s go work it. (phone rings) – EOC Logistics Section Chief. – The police or fire departments will establish a command post. That command post will report back to the EOC, with their saying what they’re doing and what resources they need. It’s the job of the EOC to get those resources out to those people in the field. Start looking at the campus infrastructure as far as power, water. – You never know how people are gonna respond when they’re in a real emergency. So we do look for people who can stay calm. I think another key aspect of it is making sure that they have training. When they have the right skill set, when they have the right knowledge, they are able to stay calm, because they know that they can fulfill their role. – Children staying with us. – [Amina] The 100 people that staff the EOC come from about 20 different campus units and they really are in positions that reflect their subject matter expertise. – Has it been reported that there’s been any contamination in Strawberry Creek? – [Peggy] We have people from Management, Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Health and Safety. – What we’re gonna be telling them is stay out of buildings until those buildings have been assessed and posted as green. I can just talk to exactly the person I need to and they can interface with their department or their function out in the field. – Operations is going to contact UCPD. They say meanwhile you should call 9-1-1. – [Voiceover] EOC, this is GMA 4. Received information to call 9-1-1. – Through the training that we receive, we have a prioritized list that we’re working from. Life is always first. But then we’re taking in the information that we’re receiving and assessing those situations and then prioritizing them. – I’d like to hear from you guys what else you know of that sounds like it’s most urgent, most important. – There’s a building collapse at Stephens Hall. – We need to confirm that right away. That’s different than what we’ve got reflected right now. – During emergency, information is one of our most sacred things, and it gets distorted a lot. There’s lots of rumors. There’s lots of unconfirmed information. So it’s important that there’s one centralized hub that can put out an accurate detailing of what’s happening during the emergency. – What we have is the chlorine leak from Hearst Gym, the collapse of Underhill, and the partial collapse of Stephens Hall with potentially people trapped, but that’s unconfirmed so far. Make sure that the police are focused on, to the extent that they can, keeping people out of those buildings. That’s the main thing. – Lewis Hall. Lewis Hall has not been green tagged yet, so we’re still not allowing any people in. The building was heavily damaged. She saw a yellow substance coming from underneath the door. She also didn’t have time to shut down her distilling process. – We’ve built a fabulous team. These are people who lean in to situations when they’re the most challenging. – Can you see if Berkley Fire or Alameda County Fire would respond to that? – We’ve got tremendous expertise on campus, and to pull that expertise into one room really benefits the campus when it needs it. – Al-Co Fire is in route to Lewis Hall for that chemical spill. – Copy, Alameda County is in route. – Yep. There’s no way that we’re going to plan for every catastrophe. But we’re as prepared as we can be. – [Peggy] The more we prepare, the better we’ll be able to respond to the real situation. Great. Thank you. If the campus is in crisis, we want to make sure that we can restore it as quickly as possible so that we are back to the mission of the university. – When an emergency does strike the campus, this is the kind of group that you want in an emergency operation center. (dramatic music)