University Challenge S46E29

University Challenge S46E29

October 15, 2019 45 By Stanley Isaacs


University Challenge. Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman. Hello. Like something out of
Edgar Allen Poe, the remorseless quarterfinal
round continues. But at least by the end of tonight’s
match, we will know the first of the four teams through to the semifinal
matches in a few weeks’ time. Both teams will know that not all
hope is lost for the losers, though, who will get one final
chance to qualify. Now, the team from
Emmanuel College – Cambridge are here having seen off the
University of Nottingham in round one and the School of Oriental
and African studies in round two. Then with another
characteristic combination of strong general knowledge
and inspired guesswork, their first quarterfinal victory
was at the expense of Warwick University. With an accumulated score of 570
thus far, let’s meet them again. Hello, I’m Tom Hill. I’m from London
and I’m reading history. Hello, my name is Leah Ward. I’m originally from Oxfordshire
and I’m studying maths. This is their captain. Hello, my name is Bobby Seagull. I’m from East Ham, in the London
Borough of Newham. I’m studying for a master’s in
education, specialising in maths. Hello, I’m Bruno. I’m from
Wandsworth, in Southwest London and I’m studying physics. APPLAUSE The team from
Corpus Christi College – Oxford had a close match in the first round,
winning by 200 points to 175, notched up by
Jesus College – Cambridge. The second round was a similar story
when they won by 175 to 150 against the reigning champions
Peterhouse – Cambridge, but they pulled off
a very convincing win in their first quarterfinal with 250 points to
Bristol University’s mere 70. Within accumulated total of
625 points, let’s meet the Corpus team again. Hello, I’m Tom Fleet.
I’m from Pendoggett, in Cornwall and I study English. Hi, I’m Emma Johnson. I’m from
North London and I study medicine. And their captain. Hi, I’m Nikhil Venkatesh. I’m from Derby and I study
philosophy, politics and economics. Hi, I’m Adam Wright.
I’m from Winnersh, in Berkshire and I’m studying for a DPhil
in physics. APPLAUSE Right, fingers on the buzzers.
Here’s your first starter for ten. Which British Imperial
possession included more than 500 princely states over which
the crown held paramount see paramountcy in a form
of indirect rule? These states included Kochin,
Baroda… India. India is correct, yes. So, you got the first set of
bonuses, Corpus Christi. They are on Homer’s Odyssey. Firstly, for five points,
in book 12 of the Odyssey, Odysseus navigates the channel
between which two mythical figures? Their names appear in a metaphor
meaning to be caught between two equally unpleasant alternatives. Nominate Johnson. Scylla and Charybdis. Correct, yes. Odysseus later lands on the island
of Thrinacia where, against orders, his men eat
the cattle of which deity? As they sail away,
Zeus sends a storm in which all but Odysseus perish. Cyclops, is that a deity? No, Cyclops had sheep, not cows. I don’t know. Who would have cows? Athena. Poseidon… Everyone… Poseidon is really angry
in the Odyssey. But he’s the sea, right? Yeah.
Yeah… Hephaestus? He could have cows.
I don’t know. Take a shot. Hephaestus? No, it’s Helios, the Sun God. The shipwrecked Odysseus is washed
up on the island of Ogygia where he is confined for seven years
as the lover of which nymph? Calypso. Calypso. Correct. Ten points for this. “Man produces “evil as a bee produces honey.” These are the words of which
Nobel laureate? Born in Cornwall, in 1911, his novels include Pincher Martin, The Inheritors
and Rites Of Passage… William Golding. Correct. Your first bonuses, Emmanuel, are on films by British
director for Gurinder Chadha. In each case, name the film from
the description. I need the precise title
in each case. Firstly, a road movie
from 1993 about three generations of Asian women from Birmingham on
a day trip to Blackpool. East… It’s not East Is East? Do we have anything else?
It’s not really… East is East. East Is East. No, it’s Bhaji On The Beach. Secondly, a 2008 film based on
Louise Rennison’s novels for young adults. It starred Georgia Groome as
a teenager from Eastbourne. It’s the… Isn’t it
the…Angus, Thongs one? Oh, Angus… Angus, Thongs and
Perfect… Yeah. Try it. That sounds like…
Georgia somebody. What’s it called?
Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging. You just… Nominate Barton-Singer. Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging. Correct. And finally, 2004 film described as
a Bollywood-style, updated Jane Austen in which Mrs Bakshi is
eager to find suitable husbands for her four unmarried daughters. Bride. Yeah. Bride And Prejudice. Bride And Prejudice is correct. Ten points for this. Listen carefully. With reference
to the book of Exodus, if locusts is eight, hail is seven and flies is four, what is two? Frogs. Frogs is correct, yes.
They are the plagues… visited upon Egypt, so you get
a set of bonuses, this time, having taken the lead, Emmanuel College,
on the number 12. If the function sigma of X
is defined as the sum of the
positive factors of X, including X itself, what is sigma of 12? 12 + 6 + 4 + 3… + 2 + 1. Yeah. So, what is it? So, that’s…
1 + 2 + 3 + 4=10 16… 28. 28, isn’t it? 28. Plus six, yeah? 28. 28. 28. Correct. 12 is the first abundant number, in other words, the smallest
positive integer X for which the sum of its factors,
excluding X itself, is greater than X. What is the second abundant number? Could it be 60 or…? 16 would be… No, 60. 60,6-0. Is it that high? I don’t know. Or there could be one
below. I feel like 60 is abundant. There could be one before it. Should we just go for 60? Try 16. What were you going to say? 28 is a perfect number,
so surely it’s… It can’t be 28. It could be 24. No, it isn’t 24. 60. 60. No, it’s 18. Oh! And finally, the totient function
phi of X is defined as the number of positive integers
not exceeding X that are co-primed to X. What is phi of 12? Five, seven, nine, ten, 11. Five. Five, yeah? Five. No, it’s four. Right, we’re going to take
a picture round now. For your picture starter, you are going to see an illustration
of a type of roulette curve. That is a path traced by a point
on one curve rolling along another. For ten points, I want the name of
this specific form of curve shown in red. A cycloid. Correct. It was named by Galileo
and sometimes called “The Helen of Geometers” because of the arguments it caused
between 17th-century mathematicians. Your picture bonuses are
three more significant types of roulette curve. I want the specific name of each. Again, you are looking for the red
curve. Firstly, for five. Cycloids… I don’t know.
Ellipsoids. No, no. Do you know what this is?
No. No. Do we know? Triangloid. Triangloid. That the deltoid or tricuspoid. Secondly. Ooh, um… What is that? It’s a… THEY CONFER QUIETLY This is coming off an X-squared type curve. Wonder if it could be… Cuspide. Cuspide. No, I just made it up. No, it’s a tractrix. Tractrix. And finally. Is that a… It’s a cardioid.
Cardioid. Cardioid. Cardioid. Correct. Ten points for this. Give both the regnal name and number
that link the following. The early 12th-century
king of Scotland, nicknamed The Fierce, the king of Yugoslavia,
assassinated in France in 1934 and the Russian tsar who was an
adversary of Napoleon I. Alexander I. Correct. These bonuses are on the
Syrian queen Zenobia. Following the death of her husband
Odaenathus in about 267, Zenobia declared herself queen of
which Roman colony and modern-day Syrian city? Aleppo? Or Tripoli. Tripoli’s not… Oh, sorry. Syria. Aleppo, Damascus, Homs. I don’t know. Try Aleppo. Aleppo. No, it’s Palmyra. Secondly, after declaring
her independence from Rome, Zenobia seized Egypt and much of
Asia Minor before her armies were defeated in Antioch
by which Roman emperor? Hm… I mean, if it’s… What period? Late… Diocletian maybe? Diocletian. 300.
It was around 300. It’s the right period.
Diocletian was 380. Diocletian. No, it was Aurelian. And finally, concerning the rivalry
between the Emperor Aurelian and the Persian Prince Arsace
for the love of Zenobia, Aurelian In Palmira is an opera of 1813 by which Italian composer? It can’t be Verdi, 1813. Donizetti.
Donizetti, probably is. That’s the right period. Yeah? Donizetti. No, it’s Rossini
Ten points for this. In legislation, what ten-letter term
describes the group of diseases such as anthrax,
botulism and malaria that must be reported to local public health
authorities if suspected or diagnosed? Contagious. Infectious. No, it’s notifiable. Ten points for this. With different spellings,
what bird links a gender equality charter for British higher
education institutions… Swan. Swan is correct, yes. OK, Corpus, these bonuses
are on psychology. For what do the letters ND stand
when denoting the concept that a person’s name may influence their
choice of job or other path in life? A cited example is that men called
Raymond are more likely to be radiologists than dermatologists. Nominative determinism. Correct. Which British magazine coined that
term, nominative determinism, in 1994, citing a book on polar
exploration by Daniel Snowman and a scholarly article on
incontinence by the urologist JW Splat
and D Weedon? The New Scientist. Is that British? Yeah. Yeah. New Scientist. Correct. In the 2015 article, which
novelist noted that his surname was a contraction of Seawolf and, quote, “Nothing to do with egotism at all, “yet the name has still made its
mark on me “such that I find similar ones
endlessly amusing.” Will Self. Correct. Ten points for this. Which two US biologists give their
surnames to an experiment of 1957 that’s been called the most
beautiful experiment in biology? It showed that DNA is replicated
semi-conservatively. Urey/Miller. No. Anyone like to buzz from
Corpus Christi? Thompson and Smith. No, it’s Meselson and Stahl. So, ten points at stake for this. Which town came second to Cardiff
in a 1954 poll to decide the capital of Wales? It was once represented in
Parliament by David Lloyd George and in 1969, its castle was the scene of the
investiture of the Prince of Wales. Pembroke. No. Caernarvon.
Caernarvon is right, yes. You get a set of bonuses this time,
Emmanuel College, on international organisations. Firstly, for five points, what year saw the establishment of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization with 12 founding members? You can have a year either way. I think it’s ’49, ’48. ’49. Yeah. 1949. Correct. In addition to Malta and Cyprus, four countries are members
of the European Union but are not members of NATO. Name three of them. European Union but not NATO. Czech Republic and Yugoslavia… Maybe southern countries. Maybe like Croatia. Greece?
Croatia, I imagine. Croatia and…? Greece, maybe. Croatia and Greece. No, I wanted you to name
three of them. They are Austria, Ireland,
Finland and Sweden. And finally, in addition to the
USA, Canada and Turkey, three countries are members of NATO,
but not of the European Union. Name two of the three. NATO, but not European Union.
So, who else is a part of NATO? Is India part of NATO?
No, I don’t think so. They’re all around the
North Atlantic. Yeah, of course. I don’t…
I can’t think of any countries. Iceland. Iceland. Iceland and…? Norway. Norway? Iceland and Norway? Was it just two,
though? Yeah, I think so. Iceland and Norway. Yes, the third one is Albania. Right, it’s time now to take
the music round. For your music starter, you’re
going to hear a piece of music by an Austrian composer. Ten points if you can
identify that composer. OPERATIC MUSIC PLAYS Schonberg. No, you can hear little more,
Corpus Christi. OPERATIC SONG RESUMES Johann Strauss. No, it’s Mahler. That’s The Farewell
from The Song Of The Earth. So, music bonuses in a moment or
two. Ten points for this starter
question. Fingers on the buzzers. First published in 1917, soon after the author’s death at the
Battle of Arras, which 16-line poem was inspired by
the poet’s own diary entry describing a train journey on a… In Flanders Fields. No. You lose five points. ..describing
a train journey on a summer’s day? It takes its name from a village and
former railway station in Gloucestershire. Adlestrop. Adlestrop is correct. Yes. Now, for your music starter,
which nobody got. We heard Kathleen Ferrier, the famous contralto a year before
her death in 1953. Your music bonuses are three more
of her notable recordings. Five points in each case if you can
give me the composer of the work. Firstly for five,
the German composer of this work. OPERATIC SONG PLAYS THEY CONFER QUIETLY Bach. It doesn’t feel Bach-y. It’s
got that… Doesn’t it? THEY CONFER QUIETLY Gluck. Did they say German?
Yeah, German. Bach sounds plausible. Yeah?
Did they say German? They said German, yeah? Yeah. Bach. That’s correct. It was Bach. It was the Agnus Dei
from the Mass in B minor. Secondly. NEW OPERATIC SONG PLAYS This is Orfeo ed Euridice.
This is Gluck. This is Gluck. This is Gluck.
THEY CONFER QUIETLY Oh, so does he just want the
name of the…? No. The original… Monteverdi. Monteverdi. Yeah. Yeah? Yeah, yeah. OK. Monteverdi. No, it was Gluck.
It was Orpheus ed Euridice. Oh, sorry. I wasn’t 100%.
And finally. NEW OPERATIC SONG PLAYS THEY CONFER QUIETLY I was thinking Haydn. Haydn. Maybe. Mozart’s Austrian. This is German
they want again. What do they…? What was your suggestion?
Haydn. Haydn. But it could equally be Mozart.
Mozart? I wouldn’t… Haydn? We’ll go for Haydn. No, that was Purcell.
That was from the Fairy Queen. Ten points for this. Answer as soon as your name
is called. The sum of the fractions
1/2 + 1/6 + 1/21 is equivalent to how many sevenths? 5/7. Correct. Right, these bonuses are on fiction. Who wrote the 1976 novel
The Alteration? It assumes that the Reformation
did not take place and opens with Himmler and Beria
hearing the voice of the choirboy Hubert Anvil at the laying to rest
of King Stephen III of England. I don’t know. No earthly clue. No. Robert Harris. It’s alternative history. Harris. No, it was Kingsley Amis. Secondly, the eccentric English
writer Frederick Rolfe was the author in 1904 of which novel? Its protagonist, a thinly
veiled self-portrait, unexpectedly becomes pope. THEY CONFER QUIETLY I feel like they wouldn’t give us
the word pope if… The Bishop of Rome.
No, it’s Hadrian The Seventh. And finally, in Philip Pullman’s
His Dark Materials trilogy, the centre of the church’s authority
lies not in Rome but in Geneva, the result of the election as pope of which historical figure of the
Reformation who died there in 1564? THEY CONFER QUIETLY Could go with Zwingli. What were you
going to go for? I don’t know. Go Zwingli. Zwingli. No, it was Calvin.
Ten points for this. In Edward II, which historical figure did
Christopher Marlowe describe as
“that sly, inveigling…” Piers Gaveston. Correct. Right, these bonuses,
Emmanuel, are on political history. Who became Chancellor the Exchequer
in 1964 and was later Home Secretary, Foreign Secretary and
Prime Minister, the only politician to have held the
four great offices of state? Is it Heath? I think it’s Heath.
Yeah? Heath, yeah? Not Macmillan? No. OK. Heath. No, it was Jim Callaghan. Oh! Which liberal politician was
Home Secretary from 1915 to 1916? He was later Foreign Secretary and
Chancellor of the Exchequer becoming Lord Chancellor in 1940. I don’t have any names. Um… Does… Say again. Is it too early for…?
Yeah, it’s too early. Could be a little bit early,
but I don’t know. Yeah, no,. It is too early.
Beveridge? Beveridge. No, it was Sir John Simon. And finally, name either of the
two 20th-century conservative politicians who before becoming
Prime Minister served successively as Foreign Secretary
and Chancellor. Served consecutively… So now it
could be Ted Heath. Ted Heath? Maybe, yeah. I’ll go for that.
We need two. Ted Heath and…? No, he said
either. Either. Oh, OK. Yeah? Ted Heath. No it wasn’t.
It was Macmillan and Major. Ten points for this.
Fingers on the buzzers. Postulated in 1951
by Ludwig Biermann and named in 1959
by Eugene Parker, what phenomenon consists of
magnetized plasma that moves past the Earth at a mean velocity of
roughly 400 kilometres per second? Solar wind. Correct. Your bonuses this time, Emmanuel,
are on geography. In each case, name the largest
country in terms of land area whose short, English name begins
with the following letters. For example, A is Australia. Firstly, 1.5 times the
size of the UK, what is the largest country whose names begins
with the letter G for golf? G. Georgia, Germany…
George is pretty small. Germany. Germany is a bit bigger
than the UK. No, should we just…? Let’s just think for a second. Germany, Georgia… There’s a lot of
African countries… Guinea. Guinea, Guinea-Bissau,
Ghana. Ghana. I think it is going to Germany. Yeah, let’s go for that? Germany. It is Germany, yes. Second,
slightly larger than Germany, what is the largest country that
begins with a J for Juliet? There’s Japan. J, let’s have a look. ..in Africa,
nor in South America. Is it Japan? No, Japan’s not bigger than Germany. I would have thought Japan is
smaller than Germany. Yeah. I can’t think of any… There might be some African
countries with J. There’s 54 of them, can’t think of
any of them right now. No… I think we’d better have it,
please. Japan. It is Japan. Finally, more than three times
the size of Japan, what is the largest country whose
name begins with the P for papa? P. Peru is quite big. Peru. Pakistan is quite large.
Poland. Pakistan. Pakistan. Pakistan is
quite big. Pakistan is big? Is that really big? Yeah, yeah.
I think it’s going to be Pakistan. Yeah? There’s nowhere else? Anywhere
else? Yeah, Pakistan makes sense.
You sure? No! Pakistan. No, Peru is bigger than Pakistan.
ALL GROAN Right, we are going to take
a picture round now. For your picture starter,
you are going to see a painting. For ten points, I simply want the name of the artist, please. Vermeer. It is Vermeer, yes. That was his The Art Of Painting,
depicting an artist in his studio. Your bonuses are three more
paintings of atelier scenes, which include the artist’s
self-portrait. Five points for each artist you
can identify. Firstly. Ooh this could be American. Is it that Singer Sargent? Like he was sort of… It looks like a sort of variation of his like… You’re the one that knows about art. Yeah, I don’t know. Whistler, if it’s American. Oh, Whistler sounds good, actually. Whistler sounds a bit better. Yeah, that’s a good shout. Whistler. Whistler is correct.
That was a good shout. Secondly. Oh, this is Courbet. OK. Courbet. Any other answers? No. Just say it. OK.
Gustave Courbet. Correct. And finally. Ooh, this looks like Lucian Freud. Yeah. And it actually
looks like him as well. It does look like him as well. It’s Lucian Freud. It is Lucian Freud, yes. Right, fingers on the buzzers. Ten points for this. Of Persons
One Would Have Wished To Have Seen and On The Pleasure Of Hating… Montaigne. No, you lose five points. ..are essays by which
English writer? His most famous books,
The Plain Speaker and Table-Talk, were both published in the 1820s? You may not confer.
One of you may buzz. Disraeli. No, it was William Hazlitt. Ten points for this, then. Bill Woodfull and Douglas Jardine
were the opposing captains in an Ashes series… The Bodyline series. Correct. Your bonuses this time,
Corpus Christi, are on contemporary and
African-American literature. Firstly, which journalist for the
Atlantic magazine wrote the award-winning memoir
Between The World And Me, first published in 2015, in the form of a series of letters
to his teenage son? I don’t know. No. No. Gary Young. No, it’s Ta-Nehisi Coates. Secondly, which Jamaican-born
US poet won the 2015 Forward Prize for best collection for
Citizen: An American Lyric? I have no clue.
No, we don’t know. That was Claudia Rankine. And finally, God Help The Child
is a novel of 2015 by which Nobel Laureate
who was born Chloe Anthony Wofford? I don’t know. Walker? Come on, let’s have it. Walker. No, that was Toni Morrison. About three minutes to go
and ten points for this. What four letters begin words
meaning a genus of moths of the Crambidae family, the family of RNA viruses
that includes that Ebola virus and a paper-thin, translucent form
of pastry? Filo. That’s correct. F-I-L-O. Right, these bonuses are on the
solar system, Emmanuel. Born in Hanover, in 1738,
which astronomer is commemorated in the names of prominent craters on
Saturn’s moon Mimas and Earth’s moon? Astronomers. Yeah, it’s a bit late for
Copernicus. Herschel. It could be… Herschel was British.
What nationality did he say? German. Born in Hanover. But he could be
German. LAUGHTER OK. Is there anything…?
Anyone else? No, OK. Herschel. Herschel is correct, yes. OK. Discovered in the 1990s by the use
of radar from orbit, Mead is an impact crater, named
after the anthropologist Margaret Mead, on which planet of
the solar system? This is just a guess, isn’t it? A rocky bit of crater. It’s got to have, like, a rocky
surface, like…Pluto. Mercury. Mercury. Mercury? Yeah. Mars, Mercury? I’ll just guess. Mercury. No, it’s on Venus. About 90km in diameter
and containing striking bright spots, the Occator crater was
discovered in 2015 on which body of the solar system? Body, so it might not be a planet.
Could it be…? Ceres. Ceres. Ceres. In 2015.
I think they found it last year. It couldn’t be the sun, could it? Is that…? An impact crater on the
sun, that’d be a bit crazy. No, no, that would be… No.
LAUGHTER Ceres. Ceres. Ceres is right.
Ten points for this. The name Khorasan appears in the
names of three provinces of which present-day country? It’s other provinces include
Golestan, Kerman and Zanjan. Uzbekistan. No. Anyone like to buzz from
Corpus? Quickly. China. No, it’s a Iran.
GONG And that, the gong.
Corpus Christi – Oxford have 55, but
Emmanuel College – Cambridge have 170. Well, bad luck, Corpus. You are
going to have to play again, I think, if you want to get through
to the semifinals. Congratulations to you, Emmanuel. You will go through to the
semifinals, for sure, and we will be seeing you again
in a few weeks’ time. We’ll look forward to that. Thank you very much for joining
us and well done. I hope you can join us next time for
another quarterfinal match, but until then, it’s goodbye from
Corpus Christi College – Oxford… ALL: Bye. ..it’s goodbye from
Emmanuel College – Cambridge… ALL: Goodbye.
..and it’s goodbye for me. Goodbye.