University Challenge S45E16 – University of Southampton vs Queen Mary, University of London

University Challenge S45E16 – University of Southampton vs Queen Mary, University of London

October 21, 2019 30 By Stanley Isaacs


University Challenge. Asking the questions – Jeremy Paxman. Hello, only one place remains in the second round. It’ll go to whichever team wins tonight. Now, both of tonight’s contestants lost their first-round matches but did so with scores creditable enough to earn them this final chance to qualify. The team from the University of Southampton took an early lead in their first-round match against St Catharine’s College, Cambridge who obliged them by digging themselves into the minuses and looking quite happy there by the halfway mark. Though, they lost the lead and fell to regain it and were 30 points behind at the gong. Still, it would have been much worse without Southampton’s knowledge of meerkats, wolverines and raccoons and their familiarity with the Horrible Histories books. With an average age of 26, let’s meet the Southampton team again. Hello, I’m Will Cable. I’m from Swindon and I’m studying for a Masters in history. Hi, I’m Sarah Stock. I’m originally from Cardiff and I’m reading chemistry. And this is their captain. Hello, my name is Tricia Goggin. I’m originally from New Ross in Ireland and I’m doing a PhD in biomedical engineering. Hi, I’m Roland Sadler, I’m from London and I’m doing biology. APPLAUSE The team from Queen Mary University of London had a similar experience to Southampton’s in their first-round match with an early lead against Nuffield College, Oxford dwindling down to a losing score of 130 to 165 at the gong. They were strong on the events of the noughties, the history of the Smithsonian and the plays of Bertolt Brecht despite the fact that some of them are pursuing areas of study that might be regarded as somewhat niche. Let’s remind ourselves of those as we meet again the team from Queen Mary. Hi, I’m Kate Lynes. I’m originally from Nottingham and I’m studying for an MD in sphincter preservation. Hi, I’m Stephanie Howard-Smith. I’m from Bishop’s Stortford in Hertfordshire and I’m a PhD student working on the cultural history of the lapdog in the long 18th century. And this is their captain. Hi, my name is Verity Williams. I’m from Eastbourne and I’m studying medicine. Hi, I’m Yolanda Lovelady. I’m from Formby near Liverpool and I’m studying medical genetics. Well, you all know the rules, let’s just get on with it. Ten points for this. Fingers on the buzzers. Meanings of what four-letter word include a person who stands firm, the solid mineral material that forms the surface of the earth, the flesh of a dogfish, cubed ice in a drink… BELL RINGS Rock. Correct. Your bonuses, the first set of bonuses, Southampton, are on swallows. Quote. “For as it is not one swallow or one fine day that makes the spring, “so it is not one day or a short time that makes a man blessed and happy.” This statement appears in the Nicomachean Ethics, a work by which Greek philosopher? It’s Aristotle. – Aristotle.
– Correct. “True hope is swift and flies with swallow’s wings. “Kings it makes gods and meaner creatures kings.” Richmond says these words on the eve of battle in which of Shakespeare’s histories? (Richard III.) Richard III. Correct. “Now with treble soft “The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft “And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.” These are the last lines of an ode by John Keats. To whom or what is it addressed? Nightingale? THEY MUMBLE – SADLER:
– Nightingale. – Nightingale.
– No, it’s to autumn. Ten points for this. Which novel in 1910 contains the following lines in its introduction? “When I began to ransack the archives of the National Academy of Music, “I was at once struck by the surprising coincidences “between the phenomena ascribed to the ‘ghost’ “and the most extraordinary and fantastic tragedy “that ever excited the minds of the Paris upper classes.” BELL RINGS Phantom Of The Opera. Correct. These bonuses, Southampton, are on 19th-century legislation. Which decade saw the passing of The Infant Custody Act after a campaign led by the novelist Caroline Norton? Her estranged husband had refused her access to her children and unsuccessfully cited the Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne, in a claim of adultery. 1830s, I think. – 1830s.
– Correct. Some of Norton’s later proposals were included in the Matrimonial Causes Act which permitted women to sue for divorce in a civil court. During which decade was this act passed? Lord Palmerston was Prime Minister at the time. It’s either ’50s or ’60s. I think it was in the 1850s. 1850s. Correct. The Married Women’s Property Act of 1882 ensured that married women had the same rights over their property as unmarried women. Who was Prime Minister at the time? Gladstone. – Gladstone.
– Correct. Ten points for this. Give the four-letter name of the plant cultivated since ancient times for both yarn and oil and which has featured several times on pound coins as a floral emblem of Northern Ireland. BELL RINGS Flax. Correct. Southampton, these bonuses are on microbiology. Firstly, what infectious agents are classified by the Baltimore system? Viruses. Correct. In this system, Group II are those viruses with a genome designated as ssDNA. For what does the double S in this expression stand? Single-strand. Single-strand, it is correct. In the same system, Group V includes the Orthomyxoviruses genera of which cause what broad group of diseases in vertebrates, including pandemic outbreaks affecting humans? – SHE MUMBLES
– Myxovirus… It’s definitely not the flu virus. CABLE WHISPERS Give me a type of disease. Type of disease? THEY WHISPER Is it just plagues? – GOGGIN SIGHS
– I don’t know. Skin diseases. No, it’s flu, influenza. Ten points for this. Which pear-shaped organ is located in the upper abdomen with its head adjacent to the duodenum and its tail extending across the midline almost to the spleen? BUZZER Pancreas. Pancreas is correct, yes. Right, these bonuses are on the operas of Verdi, Queen Mary. Rewritten after Francesco Maria Piave’s original libretto was banned for what its Venetian censors called its “obscene triviality”, which of Verdi’s operas was based on Victor Hugo’s play Le Roi S’Amuse? – HOWARD-SMITH WHISPERS
– I don’t know. We don’t know. That’s Rigoletto. Secondly, unusual among Verdi’s operas in that it has an abstract concept as its title, which work features the family of the Marquis of Calatrava and premiered in St Petersburg in 1862? THEY WHISPER – Trovatore.
– Trovatore. – HOWARD-SMITH WHISPERS
– Don’t know. Trovatore. No, it’s the Force Of Destiny, La Forza Del Destino. And, finally, based on a Shakespearean theme and featuring characters named Bardolfo, Pistola and Mistress Quickly, what was the last opera to be written by Verdi? Falstaff. Correct. We’re going to take a picture round now. For your picture starter, you’re going to see a map showing a European city. Ten points if you can identify the city. BUZZER Bologna. Bologna is correct, yes. Bologna, as you know, is home to what’s usually held to be the oldest university in the Western world. Your picture bonuses show the locations of three more of Europe’s oldest universities, all founded before 1300 and remaining in operation today. In each case, I simply want the name of the city marked. Firstly, for five… Salamanca. Correct. Secondly… Is that Lisbon? No, that’s almost on the coast. I don’t know. – Shall we go for Lisbon?
– Yeah. – Lisbon.
– No, it’s Coimbra. And, finally… Siena? Oh, no, wait, Pisa. Is that not Pisa? It’s got a really old university, hasn’t it? Pisa. No, it’s Siena. Bad luck. Ten points for this. “Instrumentation is to music “precisely what colour is to painting.” Which French composer made that statement? Born in 1803, his works include Harold In Italy, The Damnation Of Faust and the Symphonie Fantastique. BELL RINGS Oh, it’s wrong, I was going to say Saint-Saens but the actual name’s gone out of my head. You’re right, it is wrong. Right, anyone like to buzz from Queen Mary? BUZZER – Berlioz.
– Berlioz is correct, yes. Right, these bonuses, Queen Mary, are on gambling. Used in Ancient Greece as an early form of dice in games of chance, the astragalus is a bone in which joint of the human body? THEY WHISPER They definitely used knuckle bones for gambling. Knuckle. No, it’s the ank… How many of you are doctors or medics over there? It’s in the ankle. In the 1650s, which French mathematician conducted a frequent correspondence with Blaise Pascal about the solution to a gambling game and in doing so laid the foundations of a mathematical theory of probability? – Galois.
– No, it’s Fermat. And, finally, set in the fictional town of Roulettenburg, The Gambler is a short novel by which Russian writer? – Pushkin, maybe.
– THEY WHISPER Pushkin? Pushkin? Dostoyevsky. Dostoyevsky. Correct. Ten points for this. Give the four-letter abbreviation of the international organisation that produces the Red List of Threatened Species, a comprehensive… IUCN. Correct. Yes. Right, your bonuses are on food. Specifically, dishes that, according to the You.Gov website, are among the ten listed as particular favourites of viewers of this programme. In each case, name the dish from the description. Firstly, a meat dish named after the composer of the 1816 opera The Barber Of Seville. It consists of fillet steak with foie gras truffles and a Madeira sauce. – Tournedos Rossini or beef Rossini.
– Beef Rossini. Beef Rossini. No, it’s tournedos Rossini. An Indonesian dish of chicken stewed in coconut milk and spices in a style sometimes known as caramelised curry. Beef rendang? Beef rendang. Well, I said specifically it was chicken. – Oh.
– Chicken rendang. I’ll accept, that is rendang, yes, I’ll accept that. Credited to Constance Spry and Rosemary Hume at the London Cordon Bleu cookery school, a dish devised to mark an event of 1953. – Coronation chicken.
– Oh, yeah.
– Coronation chicken. Correct. Ten points for this. Listen carefully. Abbreviated forms of words meaning the queen of the sciences according to Gauss and alcohol impregnated with methanol may both be made using letters of the name of which British River? BELL RINGS The Thames. Correct. Maths and meths, for example. Right, a set of bonuses for you this time on historical climatology, Southampton. For what do the letters LIA stand when referring to a period from the 14th to the 19th centuries, marked in general terms by colder winters in Europe? Little Ice Age. Correct. The Little Ice Age coincided with a Sporer minimum and a Maunder minimum – periods of unusually low activity of what solar phenomenon? – Solar…
– Sunspots.
– Sunspots. – Sunspots are sort of…
– Sunspots. Sunspots. Correct. One theory holds that the Little Ice Age in Europe resulted from the reversal of an atmospheric circulation pattern over the North Atlantic abbreviated to NAO. For what does the letter O stand? – Oscillation.
– Oscillation. Correct. Ten points for this starter question. The Conservative politician Iain Macleod is credited with coining what portmanteau term in 1965 to describe a situation of high unemployment combined with high… BUZZER – Stagflation.
– Stagflation is right, yes. Right, your bonuses are on the words of Oscar Wilde. In each case, give the precise single word that completes the following. Firstly, from The Importance Of Being Earnest. “The truth is rarely pure and never…” Is it simple? Simple. Correct. Secondly, from Lady Windermere’s Fan. “Experience is the name everyone gives to their…” Mistakes. Mistakes. Correct. And, finally, from The Picture Of Dorian Gray. “A man cannot be too careful in his choice of…” – Enemies?
– Yeah, sounds good. – Enemies.
– Correct. We’ll take a music round now. For your music starter, you’ll hear a piece of orchestral music by an American composer. Ten points if you can give me his name, please. ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS BUZZER – Copland.
– Correct. Barley Wagons from Of Mice And Men. That was part of the film score, of course, of the film of that name. Your bonuses are pieces for film by three more classical composers who, like Copland, produced a significant body of music for film in addition to their concert works. In each case I simply want you to identify the composer, please. Firstly, for five. ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS THEY CONFER I don’t recognise that. – LOVELADY:
– Williams.
– Yeah, why not? – LYNES:
– Just go with John. John Williams. No, that’s Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Scott On The Glacier from Scott Of The Antarctic. Secondly… ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS Oh, my God. I know it’s…it’s from Robin Hood. – THEY CONFER
– Was it from Robin Hood? Adventures… THEY CONFER Oh, my God. TEAM LAUGH Come on, I think we’d better have an answer. – Robin Hood.
– Menken?.
– No. Um… Willi… – Come on, I need an answer.
– I don’t know. What a shame cos you did have the right film, it was from The Adventures Of Robin Hood. It was by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. And, finally… ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS Oh, it’s from Mary Poppins, isn’t it? No, it’s not. It’s not at all. THEY CONFER I don’t know. Come on, let’s have it, please. I don’t know. That’s Shostakovich. We’re going to take another starter question now. Fingers on the buzzers. Their name derived from the Old French for throat and specifically associated with the Gothic period, which often grotesque architectural features… BELL RINGS Gargoyles. Gargoyles is right, yes. Right, these bonuses, Southampton, which will give you the lead if you get them, are on ballerinas. Having performed in Nureyev’s Swan Lake in 1984, which French ballerina became at the age of 19 the youngest person in the history of the Paris Opera Ballet to hold the rank of star? A French ballerina. Fonteyn, she’s too old. Anybody, French ballerina? No. Margot Fonteyn. No, it’s Sylvie Guillem. Which Spanish ballerina left the Royal Ballet in 2012 to take up the artistic directorship of the English National Ballet? – Sophie…Sophie…
– I don’t know her surname. Sofia… Is it Mona? I was thinking an R word, like… – Ramonez.
– No, it’s Tamara Rojo. And, finally, born in St Petersburg in 1881, which prima ballerina was particularly noted for her performance of the dying swan? GOGGIN WHISPERS No, much older. Maybe that is Fonteyn. Russian? – Oh, not Russian.
– Russian ballerina. Oh, Margot Fonteyn again. No, it’s Anna Pavlova. Right, another starter question. In the first words of Jesus in St Mark’s Gospel in the New International Version and Tweedledee’s recitation in Lewis Carroll’s Through The Looking Glass, what four precise words precede, “The kingdom of God is near” and “the Walrus said”? BUZZER “It’s time to talk.” JEREMY CHUCKLES Anyone like to buzz from Southampton? It’s, “The time has come.” Ten points for this. 18,000 light years away and containing a microquasar, the nebula previously known as W50 was renamed in 2013 after what aquatic mammal sometimes known as a sea cow whose shape… BELL RINGS A manatee. Manatee is correct, yes. That puts you in the lead. And your bonuses, Southampton, are on botany. From the Latin for juice, what term denotes a plant with fleshy, thick tissues, adapted to water storage such as cacti? – Succulent.
– Succulent? Yeah.
– I think so. Succulent. Correct. Secondly, succulents employ a modified version of carbon dioxide fixation and photosynthesis known as CAM. For what do the letters CAM stand? Modification? Carbon activated modification… Carbon activated modification. No, it’s crassulacean acid metabolism. And, finally, a popular house plant – which succulent has thick, serrated leaves and produces a bitter medicinal sap used in cosmetics and as a treatment for burns? Aloe vera. Correct. Right, we’re going to take a second picture round now. For your picture starter you’re going to see a poster for a film adaptation of a short story. Ten points if you can tell me the title and the author of the story. Any helpful wording has, of course, been removed. BELL RINGS The Pit And The Pendulum. – Yes, who’s it by?
– Edgar Allan Poe. Correct, yes. We’ll see the whole thing now. There it is. Now, The Pit And The Pendulum was one of a series of adaptations of Poe’s Tales Of Terror by the film-maker Roger Corman. Your picture bonuses are the posters of three more of them, again with some text removed. In each case, I want the title of the work by Poe on which the film is based. Firstly, for five. Stories by Poe? THEY WHISPER It’s not The Raven either. It doesn’t look like The Raven. – Um…
– I haven’t…
– Come on, let’s have it, please. – The terrifying, red-faced man.
– LAUGHTER Well, close, but not close enough. It’s The Masque Of The Red Death. – Oh.
– Secondly… Oh, goodness. Night of the cat. Anybody? Night Of The Cat. No, that’s Ligeia. Let’s see the whole thing. There it is. And, finally… Hmm. Goodness. What was the one you said? The Tell-Tale Heart. I don’t think it is. One of them has to be a famous one. Yeah, The Tell-Tale Heart. No, that’s The Fall Of The House Of Usher. There it is. Right, ten points for this. Which Latin American country links a fungal disease that can devastate banana crops with a type of headgear made in Ecuador? The latter has a wide… BELL RINGS Panama. Panama is correct, yes. Right, your bonuses are on islands named after the day of their discovery. Firstly, for five points. Which volcanic island was named by Columbus after the day of the week on which he first sighted it? It was the birthplace of the novelist Jean Rhys in 1890 and it became independent of Britain in 1978. Dominican Republic was named after Sunday? – Yeah.
– Dominica?
– Dominica. – Dominica, named after Sunday?
– Yes. Dominica. Dominica is correct. Named by a Portuguese navigator in 1503, which volcanic island was uninhabited until British marines were stationed there in 1815 to forestall attempts to help Napoleon escape from St Helena? The one down the… – Ascension Island.
– Yeah. Ascension Island. Correct. And, finally, one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world, which Chilean territory is also known as Rapa Nui or Isla De Pascua? Easter Island. Correct. Ten points for this starter question. Sinis, the pine-bender, and Procrustes, the stretcher, were among the bandits and outlaws overcome by which legendary king of Athens? BELL RINGS Theseus. Correct. Your bonuses, Southampton, are on colours. In each case, tell me the shade of green named after the following. Firstly, known by a four-letter common name, any of more than 10,000 species of small, flowerless, spore-bearing plants of the class Bryopsida. Fern. No, it’s moss. Secondly, a copper carbonate mineral used ornamentally and as a gemstone. Jade? No. – Green?
– Amber?
– Copper carbonate.
– Amber’s…
– Amber’s not green. – Green. Ma…
– Jade. – No, it’s malachite.
– No, I was about to say malachite. Oh, sorry. And, finally, a small dabbling duck, for example, Anas crecca. Teal. Teal is right. Another starter question now. Often used with barnacles, what term in zoology derives from the Latin for “to sit” and means immobile in botany… BELL RINGS Sessile. Sessile is correct. Your bonuses this time are on euro coins, Southampton, using information from the website of the European Central Bank. Which country’s one and two euro coins depict its national emblem, a two-barred cross on three hills? – Slovakia, Slovakia.
– Is it? OK. Slovakia. Correct. Which country’s one and two euro coins show a cruciform idol from around 3000BC? It is said to reflect the country’s place at the heart of civilisation and antiquity. – Greece?
– Yeah. Greece. No, it’s Cyprus. And, finally, Raphael’s portrait of which poet appears on the two euro coin of Italy? Italian poet. – Dante?
– It’s the only one…
– SADLER WHISPERS – Let’s go for Dante.
– Dante would have been…in the 1400s. – OK.
– Dante. Dante is correct. Two and a half minutes to go. Ten points for this. What is the five-letter common name of epidemic parotitis? So called because one of its symptoms is the swelling of the parotid and other saliva… BUZZER Mumps. Mumps is right, yes. Your bonuses this time are on publishing, Queen Mary. In 1937, Penguin Books gave the name of which other bird to a series of non-fiction publications launched with George Bernard Shaw’s Intelligent Women’s Guide To Socialism? Pelican. Correct. In 1940, Penguin began publishing books for children under what imprint, also the name of a sea bird? Puffin. Correct. Appearing in 1946, the first volume in the Penguin Classics series was EV Rieu’s translation of which epic poem? Iliad. The Iliad. No, it was The Odyssey. Ten points for this. In which country is the Baikonur Cosmodrome? BELL RINGS Kazakhstan. Kazakhstan is correct, yes. Your bonuses this time are on Ancient Greece and modern vocabulary. Firstly, from the inhabitants of the Greek city on the Gulf Of Taranto, which adjective means devoted to luxury and indulgence? – Hedonistic?
– Yeah.
– Hedonistic? That’s what it means, I don’t know if that’s a place in Greece. – Hedonistic.
– No, it’s sybaritic, from Sybaris. After the perceived corruption of the Attic dialect by colonists of Soloi in Cilicia, what term denotes a non-standard or improper use of grammar or syntax? Anybody? No, we don’t know. That’s a solecism. And, finally, the region around ancient Sparta is the origin of which adjective meaning concise or pithy in verbal expression? Laconic. Laconic. Laconic. Correct. Ten points for this. Born in around 1502, Atahualpa was the last ruler of which empire? BELL RINGS The Inca Empire. Correct. 15 points for these bonuses, Southampton, they’re on Russia. In each case, give the present day name from the description. All three begin with the same two letters. Firstly, a Russian exclave on the Baltic Sea – between Poland and Lithuania.
– Kaliningrad. Kaliningrad. Correct. Secondly, an inlet of the Arctic Ocean into which major rivers such as the Ob and the Yenisei flow. – STOCK WHISPERS
– No, it begins with K.
– Oh, yeah. – Ka…ka…
– Ka… – Pass.
– That’s the Kara Sea. And, finally, a peninsula in the Russian far east – the location of around 10% of the world’s active volcanoes. Kamchatka. Correct. Ten points for this. Which of Shakespeare’s title characters is the son of Volumnia and the husband of Virgilia? BELL RINGS Coriolanus. Correct. You get a set of bonuses this time on Archbishops of Canterbury, Southampton. What is the surname of the father and son who both died… GONG And at the gong, Queen Mary – London have 120 but Southampton have 235. APPLAUSE THEY WHISPER Well, Queen Mary, we’re going to have to say goodbye to you. It’s back to the lapdogs and sphincters for you. But thank you very much for joining us. You’ve been a real treat to have with us. Southampton, 235. It’s a wonderful performance. We shall look forward to seeing you in the second round of the contest. Thank you very much for joining us too. I hope you’ll join us next time for the start of the second round matches but until then, it’s goodbye from Queen Mary – London. – ALL:
– Bye-bye. It’s goodbye from Southampton University. – ALL:
– Goodbye.
– And it’s goodbye from me. Goodbye.