University Challenge Final. St John’s v Merton. S47 E37. 2017/18. 23 Apr 2018. Jeremy Paxman

University Challenge Final. St John’s v Merton. S47 E37. 2017/18. 23 Apr 2018. Jeremy Paxman

October 15, 2019 95 By Stanley Isaacs


APPLAUSE University Challenge. Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman. And so we face the final curtain. The next half hour should prove
interesting, to say the least. Out of almost 130 teams who applied
to take part in this competition, and the 28 we’ve seen
competing since last summer, who between them have answered
or not 2,752 questions, now only the best two remain. When we hear the gong
at the end of the match, we’ll know which of them has earned
the title of series champions. Now, the team from
St John’s College Cambridge have been on tremendous form
throughout this competition. No doubt the teams
they’ve defeated, from Corpus Christi College
Cambridge, and the universities
of St Andrews, Ulster, Newcastle, and Edinburgh, are watching
and doubtless nodding in agreement. With an accumulated score of
1,155 and an average age of 23, let’s meet the
St John’s team for the last time. Hi, I’m John-Clark Levin,
I’m from Ojai, California, near Los Angeles,
and I’m studying for a PhD in politics
and international studies. Hello, I’m Rosie McKeown,
I’m from Kingston-upon-Thames in south-west London,
and I’m studying French and German. And this is their captain. Hi, I’m James Devine-Stoneman
from Southall in west London, studying for a PhD
in superconducting spintronics. Hi, I’m Matt Hazell
from Ringwood in Hampshire, and I’m studying
veterinary medicine. APPLAUSE Well, the team from Merton College
Oxford have also arrived here with an unblemished
and equally impressive record. The teams who slipped under
their steamroller over the past months are Kings College London,
Fitzwilliam College Cambridge, and the universities of Oxford
Brookes, Edinburgh, and Newcastle. So, with an accumulated
score of 1,235, and an average age of 23, let’s meet
the Merton team for the final time. Hello, I’m Edward Thomas,
I’m originally from Oxford though I now live in Kent, and I’m
reading ancient and modern history. Hello, I’m Alexander Peplow
from Amersham in Buckinghamshire, and I’m reading for
a masters in medieval studies. And their captain. Hello, I’m Leonie Woodland, I’m from
Cambridge, and I’m reading physics. Hello, I’m Akira Wiberg,
I’m from Sweden and Japan, and I’m reading from a doctorate
in molecular and cellular medicine. APPLAUSE Right, fingers on the buzzers,
here’s your first starter for ten. Quote – “Somebody introduced
dog racing into England “and somebody introduced
smallpox, bubonic plague, “and the Black Death. “Somebody is minded now to introduce “sponsored broadcasting
into this country.” Who said that in the House of Lords
in 1952? From 1927 to 38… Lord Reith? Lord Reith is correct, yes. APPLAUSE You get three bonuses
on the ineffable, Merton. A universe of ineffable gaudiness
spun itself out in his brain while the clock
ticked on the washstand – these words refer to
the uneasy nights experienced by the title
character of which 1925 novel? THEY CONFER Could it be something like…
Prodigy? I don’t know. THEY CONFER Which one? Lady Chatterley’s Lover? I don’t know, try Metamorphosis. Metamorphosis. No, it’s The Great Gatsby. Of which ancient philosopher
did the 19th-century author George Henry Lewes say, he seems utterly destitute
of any sense of the ineffable? This royal confidence powerfully
aided the development of science. Aristotle? Yeah. Aristotle. Correct. Let us think the unthinkable,
let us do the undoable, let us prepare to grapple with
the ineffable itself, and see if we may not
F it after all – these words appear in
a satirical work of 1987 by which British author? THEY CONFER Any idea? Satirical author. Douglas Adams. Correct. APPLAUSE Another starter question. The name of which aromatic herb
appears within all the following? The name of the founder of
the US city of Detroit, a Spanish term for a mountain chain, and the names of both the South
American mammal related to the… Dill. Dill is correct, yes. APPLAUSE You get three bonuses on the
Shipping Forecast, Merton College. The name of which shipping
forecast area spells the beginning of words meaning
immediately and without delay, direct and outspoken, and willing to divulge information? Just name shipping forecast places. So, it’s not Trafalgar, Fitzroy…
Biscay… Fastnet. Let’s have it, please. Fastnet. No, it’s Forth. Oh. As in forthwith, forthright,
forthcoming, and so on. The name of which shipping
forecast area spells the beginning of the name of
an anthropologist noted for his work in
the Trobriand Islands? He was born in Krakow in 1884. It’s Bronislaw Malinowski.
So, Malin. Malin. Malin. Malin is correct. The name of which shipping
forecast area spells the beginning of words meaning
a grammatical mistake, formal and dignified, and a cylindrical coil of wire
acting as a magnet? Sole? Yeah. Sole. Sole is right. APPLAUSE
Ten points for this. Differing only in that one
has three additional letters, which two words may be defined
respectively as the branch of physics concerned with forces
acting on bodies at rest, and the branch of mathematics… Statics and statistics. Correct. APPLAUSE These bonuses relate to
multiple choice. Firstly for five points, a student
knows the names of the five Great Lakes of North America
but not their relative sizes. Asked to name the two largest
by surface area, in either order, he guesses at random
with equal probability. What is the probability
both guesses are correct? Two… Two…choose…five?
One in five. No, but that’s not a probability. So… One in five times one in four,
isn’t it? Yes? No, and then times two because
it could be either way around. So, one in ten. One in ten? One in ten is correct, yes.
One over ten, 10%, one tenth. Under the same conditions, what is the probability that
both guesses are incorrect? So, er… One minus… That’s…
No, because one of them… Er, so… Erm… Four out of…er… five times three out of four? So, 12 out of… 15. Er, no, 12 out of 20. OK. Which is three out of five.
Three out of five? No, it’s three tenths,
three over ten. Finally, what are the names
of the two largest of the Great Lakes by surface area? Superior and Michigan? Probably. Superior and Michigan. No, it’s Superior and Huron. Apparently, Michigan has
a slightly smaller surface area. Right, we’re going to take
a picture round now. For your picture starter,
you’re going to see a word cloud. It represents the approximate
frequency with which these terms appear in a major
work of critical theory, according to the
index of a recent edition. For ten points,
identify the theorist in question. Note that the words are shown
in translation from French. Foucault. Foucault is correct, yes. APPLAUSE It’s volume one
of his History of Sexuality. I want you to identify now
three more critical theorists from the concepts and writers
that recur in their major works. Firstly, for five, from
a 1990 work originally in English. Who are you thinking? Try Naomi Wolf. Naomi Wolf? Naomi Wolf. No, that’s Judith Butler.
It’s from Gender Trouble. Secondly, from a 1979 work
originally in French. Derrida. I don’t know. Derrida? No, that’s Bourdieu,
Pierre Bourdieu from Distinction. And, finally,
whose 1967 work is represented here? All terms are shown
translated from French, except those that are usually
held to be untranslatable. Might as well try Roland Barthes. Not Sartre… Er, Roland Barthes? No, that is Derrida, Of
Grammatology. Ten points for this. Rooted in grief and rage but
pointed towards vision and dreams – these words of co-founder
Patrice Cullors describe which
recent political movement? It began with a three-word
hashtag slogan, and was given impetus when… Black Lives Matter. Black Lives Matter is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Your bonuses are on sociology,
St John’s. In the title of an 1887 work, what German term did
Ferdinand Tonnies used to indicate an organic rather than a social
contract conception of society? It is often rendered
in English as “community.” Gesellschaft? Nominate McKeown. Gesellschaft? No, it’s gemeinschaft. Secondly, which German-born
sociologist described the growth of an accepted
code of manners and social conduct in Western Europe in his
1939 work The Civilising Process? Pass. It is Norbert Elias. And, finally, born in Erfurt, which sociologist is best known
for the controversial 1905 work The Protestant Ethic And The
Spirit Of Capitalism? Is that Engels? Maybe. – Who?
– Engels. Engels. No, it’s Max Weber.
Ten points for this. Listen carefully,
I need a two-word answer in French. What allegorical medieval concept
features in a series of woodcuts, usually attributed to
Hans Holbein the Younger, is depicted in the final
sequence of Ingmar Bergman’s… Marriage A-la-Mode. No, you lose five points. In the final sequence
of Ingmar Bergman’s film The Seventh Seal,
and it’s also the title given to a tone poem of 1874 by
Camille Saint-Saens? Danse Macabre. Correct. APPLAUSE Three questions on the Byzantine
princess and historian Anna Komnene. Anna Komnene was
the author of The Alexiad, a history beginning two years
before the Battle of Manzikert, a Byzantine defeat
at the hands of the Seljuk Turks. In which century did that
battle occur? It was 1071, so the 11th century. 11th. The 11th century is correct. A principal theme of The Alexiad
is which specific incursion from the West launched
by Pope Urban II in 1095? The First Crusade. – The first? Is it the first?
– Yes. The First Crusade. Correct.
Anna gives a vivid portrait of the Norman adventurer Bohemond. He later became ruler of which
Crusader state named after an ancient city on
the River Orontes? I think I’ve seen that somewhere. Anything? Otranto, but… Nominate Levin. Otranto? No, it’s Antioch. Right, we’re going to take
a music round now. For your music starter,
you will hear a piece of music from an opera. For ten points,
please name the opera. ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS Erm… Lohengrin. No, you can hear some more,
St John’s. ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS Tannhauser? No, it’s The Mastersingers
Of Nuremberg. So, we’ll take the music
bonuses in a moment or two. Here’s a starter question. In 1897, the physicist
JJ Thomson proposed what name for the particles… Electron. No, I’m afraid you lose five points. For the particles that
later became known as electrons. The same term is widely
used in anatomy for minute but distinct parts of an organism,
for example, in the blood. Corpuscles? Corpuscles is correct. Yes. APPLAUSE So, you’ve taken the lead, and we follow up that recording
we heard earlier of The Mastersingers Of Nuremberg from the 2013
Last Night Of The Proms. It was conducted by Marin Alsop, making her the first woman
ever to have done so. For your music bonuses, three more recordings conducted
by her from that evening. Firstly, the title of this opera. It is loosely based on
a historical figure. OPERA PLAYS Serse. Serse. Serse. That’s correct, by Handel. Secondly, name the work for which
this well-known piece was written. It is also named after
a historical figure. # This was the charter
The charter of the land # And guardian angels
sang this strain # Rule, Britannia
Britannia, rule the waves # Britons never, never, never
Will be slaves # Rule Britannia
Britannia, rule the waves # Britons never, never, never
Will be slaves… # George II. No, that was Thomas Arne’s Alfred. And, finally, name the musical
that features this song. # Walk on, walk on # With hope in your heart # And you’ll never walk alone # You’ll never walk… # No, we don’t know. That’s from Carousel
by Richard Rodgers. So, another starter question now. In Andrew Marvell’s poem
To His Coy Mistress, what precise seven words
immediately follow the line, “The grave’s a fine
and private place”? But none, I think, do there embrace. That’s correct, yes. APPLAUSE You get a set of bonuses
on spectroscopy. The abbreviation FT-NMR refers
to the mathematical technique to analyse the output from nuclear
magnetic resonance spectroscopy. For what do the letters FT stand? Fourier Transform. Correct. For what do the letters EPR stand
in the name of a spectroscopy technique similar to NMR
but based on a particular subatomic particle rather than
an atomic nucleus? Electrons positrons something… Positron repulsion?
Does that make sense? Possibly. Electron positron repulsion? No, it’s electron
paramagnetic resonance. And, finally, used to determine
the spin-spin couplings in a given molecule, what technique is known
by the abbreviation COSY, C-O-S-Y? I don’t know. That’s not a technique I would use. Erm… No, nothing, sorry. It’s correlation spectroscopy. Ten points for this. Described as one of the greatest
royal ministers of all time, Hubert Walter became Lord Chancellor
under which monarch, having served that king’s predecessor as chief
of staff on the Third Crusade? Richard I. No. Henry III? No, it’s King John. He previously
served under Richard I. Right, ten points for this. God is something than which nothing
greater can be conceived. St Anselm. No, I’m afraid… The
ontological argument. ..you’re
going to lose five points. According to which argument
for the existence of God… Ontological. The ontological argument,
that’s right. APPLAUSE So you get a set of bonuses,
St John’s, on organic chemistry. In organic chemistry, what name is
given to the functional group that consists of an atom of carbon
double-bonded to an atom of oxygen? Carbonyl. Carbonyl. Carbonyl. Carbonyl is correct. Which class of organic compounds
is characterised by the presence of a carbonyl group in which
the carbon atom is covalently bonded to two alkyl or aryl groups? An example is acetone. A ketone. Ketone. Correct.
Named after the German chemist, which reagent is used to
distinguish between ketones and aldehydes through the
precipitation of elemental silver? That’s Tollens’. Tollens’, yes. Tollens’ reagent. Tollens’ is correct.
Ten points for this. Give three answers promptly. The highest point of land in each
of the Benelux countries is less than 700 metres. Which three contiguous
EU member states all have a highest point that is
less than 400 metres? Luxembourg, Belgium,
and the Netherlands? No, anyone like to buzz from Merton? Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia. Correct. APPLAUSE Your bonuses are on the
four great classical novels
of Chinese literature. Firstly, for five points, the
Romance Of The Three Kingdoms is set during the period of internal strife that followed
the fall of which dynasty? The Three Kingdoms is after
the Han dynasty, I think. OK. Han dynasty. Correct. In the title of the 18th-century
novel Hong Lou Meng, what is the meaning
of the word Hong? It’s a common adjective
that appears in several English versions of the title. THEY CONFER It’s an adjective? Oh. So, fragrant. Fragrant. No, it’s red. In 1942, the British
scholar Arthur Waley published an English version
of part of Journey To The West under what single word title? Monkey. Monkey. Correct. We’re going to take
the second picture round now. Your picture starter, you’re going to see a painting
by an American-born artist. Ten points
if you can identify the artist. Singer Sargent. No.
Anyone like to buzz from St John’s? Mary Cassatt. Correct. APPLAUSE
The Child’s Bath. Her depiction of motherhood. Your picture bonuses are
three 20th-century works on the same theme. In each case,
simply name the artist. Firstly… Ooh, um… THEY CONFER I’ve got nothing, though.
Anish Kapoor. No, that’s by Louise Bourgeois. It’s the Bilbao version of her
sculpture Maman. And, secondly… Who is that going to be? That looks like Leonora Carrington. Yeah, go for that. Leonora Carrington. It is Leonora Carrington.
A Warning To Mother. And, finally… Ooh, is that going to be
Frida Kahlo? Possibly, yeah. It looks like her. Erm… Or Diego Garcia…
I think Frida. Frida. Frida Kahlo. It is Frida Kahlo, a self portrait
based on her own experiences. Now, ten points at stake
for this starter question. Often cited as a glaring omission
in Nobel Prize-giving history, who missed… Gandhi. No, I’m afraid you lose five points. Who missed the 1944 Nobel Prize
in chemistry won by Otto Hahn, her colleague of 30 years,
for the discovery of… Lise Meitner. Correct. APPLAUSE These bonuses are on
the US author Willa Cather. Born in Virginia in 1873, Cather spent her formative
years in which Midwestern state? For several years,
she lived in Red Cloud, a few miles north of the border
with Kansas. Nebraska. Nebraska? Correct. The title of Cather’s
1913 novel O Pioneers! appears in the title of a work by
which poet born in New York in 1819? Is that Whitman? Walt Whitman. Correct. Cather’s 1927 novel
Death Comes For The Archbishop concerns a Roman Catholic priest
in which US territory, admitted to the union in 1912? THEY CONFER Arizona. Arizona. No, it’s New Mexico. There are about four minutes to go,
and ten points for this. The greatest bird poet
in the language. He managed to write about 147 species without
any technical kit whatsoever. These words from a 2009 anthology refer to which poet who died
in 1864 in a Northampton asylum? John Clare. John Clare is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Your bonuses are on
linguistic terms, St John’s. All three answers begin with
the same two letters. Firstly, borrowed from German, what word signifies
the morphological variation of a root vowel, such as in the English
verb inflection sing, sang, sung? THEY CONFER German derived… No idea. Erm… Diagraph. No, it’s ablaut. Meaning autonomous, what word is used to describe a
clause constructional case that is not syntactically dependent on
another part of the sentence? Ablative is either this one
or the next one. OK. Ablative. No, it’s absolute. And, finally, what word denotes
a case of nouns and pronouns that express direction from a place,
such as by, with, or from? Ablative. That is the ablative, yes.
Ten points for this. Listen carefully. In the seven ages of man speech
in Shakespeare’s As You Like It, what animal is likened to the
whining schoolboy creeping unwill… Snail. Snail is right. Yes. APPLAUSE These bonuses are on
a mathematician, St John’s. A prime P is said
to be in this class if both P and 2P+1 are prime. This definition refers to
a class of primes named after which mathematician born in Paris in 1776? Legendre. No, it can’t be.
Malus? Come on. Legendre? No, it’s the Sophie Germain prime. After reading his arithmetical
investigation, Sophie Germain
began a correspondence under a male pseudonym with
which German mathematician? German mathematician of the time? When was Mobius around? Cantor? Or… Gauss? Gauss. I was going to say Gauss. Gauss. Gauss is correct. In 1819, Sophie wrote to
Gauss with a proposed strategy for solving which
problem in number theory? Devised in 1637, it’s the subject
of a work by Simon Singh. I think that’s
Fermat’s Last Theorem. Fermat’s Last Theorem. Correct. Ten points for this. Which SI-derived unit
may be expressed as candelas times steradians? It is one of two SI units
whose names in Latin mean light. Lux. No. Anyone to buzz… Lumen. Lumen is correct, yes. APPLAUSE These bonuses are on a
UN Secretary-General, Merton. In 1992, which Egyptian scholar and
statesman became the first Arab to hold the office of Secretary-General
of the United Nations? Nominate Wiberg.
Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Correct. In 1991,
Boutros-Ghali became Egypt’s Deputy Prime Minister
for foreign affairs under which president who was ousted during
the Arab Spring of 2011? Mubarak? Mubarak. Correct. In 1996, which permanent
member of the UN Security Council successfully blocked Boutros-Ghali’s
bid for a second term of office? China. China. No, it was the USA.
Ten points for this. The city is not a concrete jungle,
it is a human zoo – which broadcaster and anthropologist wrote this in a work
first published in 1969? David Attenborough. No, anyone to buzz from Merton? It’s Desmond Morris.
Ten points for this. Occurring, for example,
in feldspars and micas, what, after oxygen and silicone… GONG APPLAUSE Merton College have 100,
St John’s College have 145. APPLAUSE CONTINUES Well, bad luck, Merton, you’ve been on terrific form through
this series, you certainly deserve to be in the final, and there’s
no shame in coming in as runner-up. St John’s,
many congratulations to you, 145, terrific score again from you. We shall look forward to seeing you
receive the trophy. APPLAUSE Now, to present the trophy is
one of the UK’s leading composers, a winner of the Queen’s Medal For
Music and an Ivor Novello Award. She’s written numerous operas
and concert pieces, and was awarded
a CBE in 2005. Since 2014, she’s held
a role first granted to Nicholas Lanier
by Charles I in 1626, and later held by Edward Elgar,
Malcolm Williamson, and Peter Maxwell Davies. Please welcome the Master of the
Queen’s Music, Judith Weir. Welcome. Thank you. Well, what did you think? I thought that was a very tough
contest indeed. It was very, very hard.
Extremely close. It’s amazing what
people know, isn’t it? And can remember when they need to. OK, can I ask you, then, please, to present the trophy,
then, to our winners, St John’s College Cambridge. APPLAUSE Bravo to you. Thank you. Congratulations. Well done. Congratulations.
Thank you very much. Congratulations. Fantastic. Thank you. WHOOPING AND CHEERING Well, that’s it.
Many thanks to Judith Weir for presenting the trophy, thanks to both of our teams
of finalists, and congratulations to all
the dozens of teams that took part or tried to take part, and many
thanks to all of you for watching. Until next time, goodbye. APPLAUSE Subtitles by Red Bee Media