University Challenge – Christmas 2018 E01 Brasenose, Oxford vs. Bristol

University Challenge – Christmas 2018 E01 Brasenose, Oxford vs. Bristol

October 21, 2019 21 By Stanley Isaacs


Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman. APPLAUSE Hello. Our Christmas present to the
country’s students is a brief respite from the rigours
of this competition, because over the next few evenings
their places are going to be taken by distinguished alumni of 14 of
Britain’s leading universities and university colleges. They very sportingly accepted our
invitation to compete for the honour of their former institution
in this short, seasonal series for nothing more than the glory of
being named Christmas champions. In order to take part, we asked simply that they managed
not to get thrown out of the place they’re playing for,
that they took at least some sort of a degree there
and that, since leaving, there’ve gone on to make their mark
in their chosen field. Ticking those boxes, then, the team
from Brasenose College, Oxford – the world’s only college to have
been named after its own door knob. Their first team member is
a distinguished scientist and the recipient of numerous awards,
including the Hooke Medal and the Royal Society
Rosalind Franklin Award. With her,
an award-winning economist, journalist and broadcaster,
who will be very familiar to Radio 4 listeners as the presenter of the
statistics programme, More Or Less. Their captain is the author of
several acclaimed books, including her novel for children,
The Restless Girls, and for grown-ups, the bestsellers
The Muse and The Miniaturist, which was televised last Christmas. Their fourth player spends a great
deal of time looking at odd things and deciding if they’re
worth anything at all, so she’ll be as much in her element
on this programme as she is on the Antiques Road Trip,
Flog It! and Bargain Hunt. But let’s get the Brasenose team
to introduce themselves now. Hello, I’m Andrea Brand, I studied biochemistry at Oxford,
graduating in 1981 and now I’m Herschel Smith Professor
of Molecular Biology and Royal Society
Darwin Trust professor at the University of Cambridge, where
I study stem cells in the brain. I’m Tim Harford, I studied
philosophy, politics and economics in the 1990s and now I’m
a columnist for the Financial Times. This is their captain. Hello, I’m Jessie Burton, I graduated from Brasenose in 2004
with a degree in English and Spanish and I now work as a novelist. Hello, I’m Kate Bliss, I graduated in English in the 1990s and I’m now a fine-art valuer. APPLAUSE Playing them is the team from
Bristol University, founded on fortunes made in
chocolate and tobacco. Their first player is a
science journalist and author. For 20 years, he was an editor on
Nature magazine and has written around two dozen books, including Critical Mass:
How One Thing Leads To Another, for which he won the Aventis Prize. With him, a writer who earned
the George Devine Award and an Olivier Award nomination for
her play, Breathing Corpses, as well as the Critics’ Circle Award
for Most Promising Playwright. Her play Posh, filmed as
The Riot Club, shows us Oxford’s most privileged students in
a not wholly uncritical light. Their captain has been named Digital
Security Journalist of the Year, he’s been a war correspondent
and has worked on the reconstruction of former war zones. It’s said that his name is
conspicuously absent from the Christmas card list of
the world’s major criminals. Their fourth player has been
described as geology’s rock star, a title for which there’s doubtless
some pretty stiff competition. An MBE, an academic and prolific
broadcaster, he is the only player in this competition to have had a
Madagascan ant named after him. Let’s meet the Bristol team. Hello, I’m Philip Ball,
I graduated from Bristol in 1988 with a PhD in physics and I’m now a writer, journalist
and broadcaster. Hello, I’m Laura Wade, I graduated in 1999 with a degree in drama and I’m now a playwright. And this is their captain. Hello, I’m Misha Glenny, I graduated from Bristol in 1980
with a degree in drama with German. I’m a former BBC Central Europe
correspondent and I wrote the book McMafia, upon which the
television series was based. Hi, I’m Iain Stewart, I got a PhD in geology
from Bristol in 1990, went on to make programmes about
the planet with BBC Science. I’m now a professor of geology
down at University of Plymouth. APPLAUSE Well,
the rules are the same as ever, ten points for starter questions,
15 points for bonus questions. We’re playing seven first-round
matches, but only the four winning teams with the highest scores will
go through to the semifinals. So, fingers on the buzzers,
here’s your first starter for ten. Bounteous, or nourishing mother,
is the literal meaning of what two-word Latin phrase, referring to
a person’s former seat of learning? Alma mater. Correct. APPLAUSE Your bonuses are on world cities
as listed in 2018 in Mercer’s annual
quality-of-living rankings. Firstly, San Francisco is the
highest-placed city in the US at number 30. What is the highest-ranking
city in the Americas? Placed at number five, it’s about
900 miles north of San Francisco. Canada? Vancouver.
Vancouver? Vancouver. Vancouver. Correct. Tied with Munich in third place, what is the highest-ranked city in
the southern hemisphere? It’s named after
the aristocratic title of the English politician,
George Eden. Somewhere in New Zealand. Wellington? I’d say Wellington.
Wellington. Wellington. Wellington. No, it’s Auckland. Which central-European capital
retained its first-place ranking on the 2018 Mercer list? Vienna. Correct. Ten points for this.
Designed in a red-brick, Jacobean style by the architect
AJ Humbert, which Royal house was
described by George V as, “The place I love better than
anywhere else in the world”? Completed in 1870,
it is now the regular site of the Royal Family’s Christmas
celebrations. Sandringham.
Sandringham’s correct, yes. APPLAUSE Your first set of bonuses,
Brasenose, are on people who, since 2004, have appeared in
Forbes magazine’s annual list of the world’s most powerful women. In each case,
give the name from the description. Firstly, a politician who served as US Secretary of State
from 2005-2009. Condoleezza Rice or Albright? Condoleezza Rice. Condoleezza Rice. Condoleezza Rice. Correct. Secondly, an Italian-born politician
who assumed leadership of the Indian National Congress
party in 1998? I need forename and surname here. Italian-born? One of the Gandhis? Indira Gandhi? No. No. No? No. No. No, we don’t know, sorry.
It’s Sonia Gandhi. Finally, a French lawyer
and politician who was appointed managing director of the
International Monetary Fund in 2011? That’s Christine Lagarde. Christine Lagarde. Correct. Ten points for this.
“He preferred the hard truth “to his dearest illusions.” These words of the US scientist
Carl Sagan refer to which German astronomer? Born 1571, he’s noted for his laws
of planetary motion. Kepler. Kepler is correct. APPLAUSE These bonuses are on
carol singing, Bristol. A university choir has
a repertoire of five carols, including In The Bleak Midwinter
and Away In A Manger. How many different orderings of
the five carols are possible if each is sung once? Factorial. Isn’t it five factorial? Which would be 120. That feels… That feels too many. I’ll take a guess, seven? No, it’s 120,
as was suggested to you. In any particular singing session, one of the 120 orderings is chosen
at random, with equal probability. What is the probability that
In The Bleak Midwinter and Away In A Manger are sung
first and second, in that order? Try 30. Nominate Ball. 30? No, it’s 1/20, one 20th. And finally, if orderings are
chosen independently at random on two successive nights, what is the probability that
In The Bleak Midwinter is sung some time before
Away In A Manger on both nights? LAUGHTER Oh, Jesus! Let’s say one in… ..40. 1/40. No, it’s 1/4, 0.25. We’re going to take
a picture round now. For your picture starter, you’ll see a map on which a group of
islands has been highlighted in red. Ten points if you can tell me
the name by which the whole group is usually known. Dodecanese. That is the Dodecanese, well done. APPLAUSE The Dodecanese Islands were among
the territories that changed hands as a result of the treaties that
followed the end of World War I. Your picture bonuses are three more
of the significant territories on the negotiating table in the
aftermath of the First World War. Five points for each you can name. Firstly, please give me the name
of this peninsula. Oh, it’s… Does it begin with an I? Istria, you’re right. Istria. It is Istria, you’re right. Secondly,
the name of this German state? Is that Alsace? Must be it. Alsace. No, that’s the Saarland, which was occupied by
French and British troops. And finally,
the name of this region? That’s Transylvania. It is Transylvania, yes. Right, ten points for this. Built in the 16th century,
the Auberge d’Aragon and the Auberge de Provence are noted
buildings in which capital city? It is named after one of its
founders, a grand master of the Order of Hospitallers, and is the
smallest capital city in the EU. Valletta. Valletta is correct, yes. APPLAUSE You get a set of bonuses on
20th-century Latin American authors. The 1968 semiautobiographical work
Betrayed By Rita Hayworth, in which a boy fantasises about
the lives of Hollywood film stars, is the debut novel of which
Argentinian author? I think it’s Borges. Borges. No, it’s Manuel Puig. What is the surname of
the family whose lives, over seven generations,
are detailed in Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s 1967 work
100 Years Of Solitude? Erm, is it Macon? No, it’s the Buendia family. Which Peruvian author was
the 2010 recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature? His works include
The Time Of The Hero, first published in 1963. Vargas Llosa. Mario Vargas Llosa is correct. Ten points for this.
Found next to the stomach, which fist-sized organ
acts primarily as a blood filter and plays an important role
in destroying red blood cells and storing certain immune cells? It was earlier believed to be
the seat of bad temper. Spleen. The spleen is correct, yes. APPLAUSE So you get a set of bonuses,
Brasenose, an Danish scientists. Firstly, for five points,
born in the Faroe Islands, Niels Finsen received
the 1903 Nobel Prize in medicine for the application of light
in what general class of diseases? The citation specifically
mentions lupus vulgaris. Blood disorders? Yeah? Shall I go for it? Blood disorders. No, they’re skin diseases. Born in 1950, Bjarne Stroustrup
is noted for the creation of which widely
used programming language? I need the precise
three-character name. I’ve no idea. Let’s go for C++. C++. C++. Correct. Finally, appointed head of
the Carlsberg Laboratory in the 1880s, Emil Christian Hansen
made ground-breaking steps in cultivating pure strains of
what general type of microorganism? Bacteria? Yep? Bacteria. No, it’s yeast. Right, we’re going to take
a music round now. For your music starter,
you’ll hear a song from a musical. Ten points if you can give me the
name of the musical. # The minute you walked in
the joint… # Sweet Charity. Sweet Charity’s
correct, the song was Big Spender. APPLAUSE That scene from Sweet Charity
was memorably recreated by Morecambe and Wise
on their 1975 Christmas show. For your music bonuses, you’re going to hear three more
songs used in notable sketches from Morecambe and Wise
Christmas specials. Again, I need the name of
the original musical or film in which they appeared. Firstly, which musical is this from? # There is nothing like a dame # Nothing in the world… # South Pacific. Correct. Secondly,
this is from which 1968 film? # Like a circle in a spiral # Like a wheel within a wheel # Never ending or beginning… # The Thomas Crown Affair. Correct. And finally, this was introduced
in which 1936 film? # There may be trouble ahead # But while there’s moonlight and
music and love and romance # Let’s face the music and dance # Before the… # Is it Top Hat? No, it was Follow The Fleet. Right, ten points for this. In Alexander Pope’s
Essay On Criticism, which seven words directly
precede the line, “Drink deep or taste not
the Pierian spring”? It’s, “A little learning is a
dangerous thing,” as we’re discovering, I think!
LAUGHTER Right, ten points for this. In April 2018, which singer was
commissioned to contribute material for a project celebrating
the Bronte sisters? 2018 also saw the 40th anniversary
of her number-one single… Kate Bush. Correct. APPLAUSE Right, your bonuses are on English
words of Indian origin, Bristol. In each case, identify the word
from the description. Firstly, possibly derived from
Gujarati or Marathi, a noun meaning a large receptacle
or storage chamber, especially for liquids or gas. Samovar? I’ve no idea. Anything? No. Nope, sorry. It’s tank. And secondly,
a word taken from Hindi. It means a small recreational
or racing boat. For example, one with a mast and
sails or one that’s inflatable. Dinghy. Dinghy. Dinghy. Correct. Derived from the Sanskrit
word for five, because it originally
had five ingredients, a mixed alcoholic or non-alcoholic
drink that is typically served hot? Toddy. Toddy. No, it’s punch. Ten points for this. Brittle bladder and Adder’s-tongue are among several thousand species of which diverse group
of non-flowering plants? They usually reproduce by spores
rather than seeds. Ferns. Ferns is correct. APPLAUSE These bonuses are on locations
in crime fiction. Firstly, give the precise London
address of the residents described in a novel of 1887
as having “A couple of comfortable bedrooms “and a single, large,
airy sitting room, “cheerfully furnished and
illuminated by two broad windows.” Do we think it’s Holmes and Watson?
Yes, so is it 221B Baker Street? That’s right. 221B Baker Street. Correct. Secondly, 110A Piccadilly,
near Green Park, is the address of which fictional detective who
first appeared in a novel of 1923? Poirot? That’s as good as… Poirot? Is it a bit early? That seems about right. Poirot. No, it was Lord Peter Wimsey. And finally, a flat above Bottle
Street police station, Piccadilly, is the address of which detective, who first featured in the 1929 novel
the Crime At Black Dudley? Go for Poirot again, or…? Go for Poirot again. I don’t
think Poirot lives in Bottle Street. I’ll say it. Poirot? No, it was Albert Campion. Ten points for this. Answer as soon as
your name is called. In the 20th century,
who was the only president of the United States whose surname
began with a vowel? Obama. No, I said 20th century,
so I’m afraid you’re wrong. Bristol, quickly? Eisenhower.
Eisenhower is correct, yes. APPLAUSE So you get a set of bonuses
on conscience. In each case, you will hear
a quotation from Shakespeare, simply identify the play
in which it appears. “My conscience hath
1,000 several tongues “And every tongue
brings in a several tale “And every tale
condemns me for a villain.” Hamlet. Hamlet. Is it Iago? Does he have a conscience?
Does he have a conscience! Hamlet. No, it’s Richard III. “I feel within me a peace above
all earthly dignities “A still and quiet conscience.” Richard II, possibly? Give it a go? Give it a go. Richard II? No, that’s
Cardinal Wolsey in Henry VIII. And finally,
“The play’s the thing “Wherein I’ll catch
the conscience of the king.” That’s Hamlet. That’s Hamlet. Hamlet. That is Hamlet,
you’re right. Right, another picture round. For your picture starter, you’ll see a photograph of an
historical event in a European city. Ten points if you can give me
the city and the year that the photograph was taken. Is it Paris, 1968? It is indeed, yes. APPLAUSE The student riots then. Your picture bonuses are photographs of three more significant
protests of 1968. I’d like you to name the city
in which each took place. Firstly, this US city. Birmingham? It’s got to be south, hasn’t it? Well, except there’s a big black
community in Chicago. OK. Chicago. No, that’s Memphis. Secondly, another US city. I think, again, it might be Chicago. I think it’s Chicago. We’re going to try Chicago again. It is,
it’s the anti-Vietnam War protest. And finally, this European city. That’s Prague. That is Prague, yes. Right, ten points for this. I need a single-word name here. Thought to have been invented at the
French court in the 17th century, which woodwind instrument has a
double-reed mouthpiece… Cor anglais. No. You lose five points. ..and derives its name from the
French for high wood? Oboe. Oboe is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Your bonuses are on Germany,
Brasenose. In each case, give the predominate
cardinal direction in which one would travel in the shortest
straight line from the first city to the second. For
example, Munich to Vienna is east. Firstly, Hanover to Hamburg. Any ideas? It’s going to be one of…
Guess. Any ideas? I’m going to guess south, but that’s
just a guess. A complete guess. South. No, it’s north. Secondly, Frankfurt to Heidelberg. Erm… Heidelberg is in the… The west? We’ve got two for east here.
OK, then. East. No, it’s south. Oh, God!
And finally, Dresden to Cologne. Dresden’s in the east and
Cologne’s in the west. So if you’re going TO Cologne
you’d be going…? Well, Cologne’s in the west.
Cologne’s in…the east, I thought? Cologne’s in the west. Oh, right.
I promise you that one. OK, I believe you. So, west. So, Dresden TO Cologne? Dresden to Cologne, yes. So, west. West. West is correct.
You’ve spent too long with sat navs. Right, ten points for this. The U2 song New Year’s Day was inspired by which European
trade union movement, founded in September 1980,
at the…? Solidarity?
Solidarity is correct, yes. APPLAUSE
These bonuses are on foods traditionally eaten
around Christmas. Give the name of the foodstuff that
corresponds to the following. Firstly, the biblical figure whose
brothers were Shem and Japheth? That’s ham, isn’t it? Ham. Yeah. Ham. Ham is correct. Secondly, the Irish rock band
noted for songs including Linger and Zombie? Cranberries? Cranberries. The Cranberries is correct. Finally, the country of birth
of the author Orhan Pamuk? Turkey? Turkey? Turkey. Turkey’s correct. There’s about 2.5 minutes to go,
ten points for this. Identify the family of the order
carnivora to which the following belong. The kodkod, margay, oncilla, serval, southern tigrina and ocelot? Cats. Correct. APPLAUSE You get a set of bonuses on
double A-sides that were Christmas number ones in
the UK singles charts. In each case, you’ll hear the year,
the artist and one of the A-sides. For five points, name the other. Firstly, in 1977,
Wings, Girls’ School. Mull Of Kintyre. Yeah. Mull Of Kintyre. Correct. Secondly, 1965, The Beatles,
Day Tripper. Paperback Writer, I think. Paperback Writer. No, it’s We Can Work It Out. And finally, 1991, Queen,
These Are The Days Of Our Lives. That’s Bohemian Rhapsody. It was the re-release.
Bohemian Rhapsody. Bohemian Rhapsody. Correct. Ten points for this. Answer as soon as your name
is called. Which colour lies at the centre of
the visible spectrum? Green. Correct. APPLAUSE Your bonuses, Brasenose,
are on animals whose names comprise a repeated series of letters,
such as the dodo or the dik-dik. Identify the animal in each case. Firstly, a nocturnal
Madagascan lemur with an elongated middle finger, adapted for extracting
insect larvae from wood. Any ideas? Nope. I know it, but I can’t… So it’s, like, should I just…? No? N, P? Anything? R? S? Come on. Got nothing. The shoe-shoe?
LAUGHTER The shoe-shoe? It’s the aye-aye.
Well, there you go. And secondly, a South American
freshwater turtle of the genus Chelidae, characterised by its long,
distinctively ridged head and neck. A snapping turtle.
What is it, a turtle? It’s a snapping turtle
of some sort, but… I’m not going to make up
another animal. Pass. It’s a mata mata. And finally, a long-legged bird of
the falcon family, also native to South America, it has species
known as crested and red-throated. GONG APPLAUSE And at the gong,
Brasenose College, Oxford have 100, and Bristol University have 150. That was a caracara, by the way,
I was looking at at the end, but you could have
made up anything, really. LAUGHTER Anyway, Brasenose,
thank you very much for joining us. Neither of you guys had to do this,
so we’re grateful to you, thank you very much indeed. Bristol, congratulations, 150,
a pretty good score, you might come back as one of the
four highest-scoring, winning teams. Let’s see. I hope you can join us next time
for another first-round match, but until then, it’s goodbye from
Brasenose College, Oxford. Goodbye. It’s goodbye from
Bristol University. Goodbye. And it’s goodbye from me. Goodbye. APPLAUSE