University Challenge – Christmas 2014 E07 Manchester Metro Uni vs Goldsmiths, Uni of London

University Challenge – Christmas 2014 E07 Manchester Metro Uni vs Goldsmiths, Uni of London

October 20, 2019 7 By Stanley Isaacs


Christmas University Challenge. Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman. APPLAUSE Hello. 12 teams of graduates have surprised us over the past six matches with both the breadth of their general knowledge and their evident willingness to display it in such an unreasonable competition. The four highest scoring teams so far are Edinburgh University with 235 points, the University of Hull with 205 and Lady Margaret Hall Oxford and Trinity Hall Cambridge who are tied on 195 points apiece. Now, Manchester Metropolitan University consists of several schools, some of which specialise in theatre and the arts, a fact which is reflected in the composition of their team tonight. First, though, is their scientist who heads an organisation which investigates accidents across pretty much the entire industrial sector. With him, a writer, impressionist, comedian and actor, perhaps best known for his roles in The Fast Show and Cold Feet. Their captain is also an actor whose CV includes one of the defining screen performances of the 1980s, Yosser Hughes in Boys From The Black Stuff, and roles in films such as Ghandi, Titanic and the Lord Of The Rings trilogy. Their fourth member is the go-to guy for footballers in trouble, either on or off the pitch. A former professional footballer himself, he heads what is said to be the world’s longest established professional sportspersons’ union. Let’s meet the MMU team. Hello, I’m Eddie Morland. I graduated in Physics in 1982 from MMU and I now run the National Health And Safety Laboratory. Hello, I’m John Thompson. I graduated from what was then called Manchester Polytechnic in the late ’80s and I’m currently looking for a very, very well-paid pantomime. And this is their captain. Hi, I’m Bernard Hill and I studied drama at the Manchester Metropolitan University and I left there in the early ’70s and I’m still acting. Good evening. I’m Gordon Taylor and I studied economics at what was then the Manchester College Of Commerce and graduated in 1969 and I’ve been chief executive of the Professional Footballers’ Association since 1981. APPLAUSE Now, their opponents represent Goldsmiths, a constituent college of the University Of London. It specialises in the arts, and their first team member has been associated with the young British artists who emerged in the late 1980s. Shortlisted for the Turner Prize, she’s also a professor of painting at the Royal Academy. With her, a songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who came to prominence with The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band, a close associate of the Pythons. He also wrote I’m The Urban Spaceman, for which he won a Novello Award. And if their captain’s face isn’t immediately familiar, her voice certainly is, as a stalwart of news broadcasting and continuity on Radio 4. And finally, a science teacher turned comedian who’s also a broadcaster and a columnist for the Guardian and the New Statesman. Let’s meet the Goldsmiths’ team. I’m Fiona Rae. I graduated in fine art in 1987 from Goldsmiths and I’m an artist. I’m Neil Innes. I graduated in fine art from Goldsmiths in 1966 and I am. LAUGHTER Their captain. Hello, I’m Corrie Corfield. I graduated from Goldsmiths in 1982 with a degree in English and drama and I now read things out loud on the radio. Hello, I’m Shazia Murza and I graduated from Goldsmiths in 1996 with a PGCE in science and I was so good at it, I’m now a comedian. APPLAUSE OK, you all know the rules. 10 points for starters, 15 for bonuses, starter questions you have to answer on your own on the buzzer. Bonuses are team efforts. You can confer among yourselves for those. So, fingers on the buzzers. Here’s your first starter for ten. The film Chimes At Midnight, directed by and starring Orson Welles, Ran, directed by Akira Kurosawa, and My Own Private Idaho starring River Phoenix are films based on works by which dramatist? BUZZER William Shakespeare. Correct, yes. APPLAUSE So you get the first bonuses, Goldsmiths. They’re on Irving Berlin, the composer of White Christmas. Firstly, for five points, an unusual version of Irving Berlin’s song Puttin’ On The Ritz is performed in which Mel Brooks film of 1974? Er, Young…Young Frankenstein. – Young Frankenstein.
– Correct. Which 1935 film musical stars Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire and features Irving Berlin’s songs Cheek To Cheek and No Strings? THEY CONFER – Easter Parade.
– No.
– Singin’ In The Rain? – No.
– No, it’s not enough. We don’t know. No, sorry, don’t know. That’s Top Hat. And finally, Michael Cimino’s film The Deer Hunter ends with a scene in which several characters sing which patriotic song written by Berlin in 1918? THEY CONFER America The Beautiful. No, it’s God Bless America. 10 points for this. What eponymous system of writing was inspired by a method of night-time battlefield communication developed by Charles Barbier in 1819? It consisted of a system of tangible writing using embossed dots. BUZZER Morse code. Nope. BUZZER – Braille.
– Yes, Braille is correct. So we’re going to take a set of bonuses now on the Tour de France. What term is used in the Tour de France and other cycle races for the main group of cyclists riding together during a stage? The word translates as “little ball”. – Peloton.
– Correct. What is the pattern on the maillot a pois, the jersey worn by the King of the Mountains, that is, the rider who’s performed best on the mountain stages? THEY CONFER – Polka dots.
– It is polka dots or spots. Named after the lamp formerly hung at the back of a railway train as a safety device, the lanterne rouge is awarded to which rider in the tour? The last? – The fastest sprint? What do you think?
– No. – The last rider.
– Indeed, it’s the one that finishes in the longest time. APPLAUSE Right, 10 points for this starter question. Fingers on the buzzers. Hong Kong on a very bad day, the industrial landscape of north-east England, and Fritz Lang’s Metropolis have been cited as references for the production design of which futuristic film noir released in 1982… BUZZER – Blade Runner.
– Blade Runner is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Your bonuses, Manchester, are on medicine. In each case, give the common two-word name of the following conditions. Firstly, for five points. Adhesive capsulitis, a condition in which the connective tissue surrounding the glenohumeral joint becomes inflamed and stiff, restricting movement of the arm. Tennis elbow. No, it’s frozen shoulder. Secondly, lateral epicondylitis, a repetitive use injury resulting in non-inflammatory degeneration of the tendons of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle? THEY CONFER It’s carpals, carpals is hands. – Tarsals is toes.
– So what is it?
– Don’t know. Typer’s cramp. Cramp. No, that was tennis elbow. Bad luck. And finally, onychocryptosis. This occurs when the unguis of a digit grows to cut in to the paronychium, resulting in a painful inflammation. – Ingrown toenail.
– Correct. Right, we’re going to take a picture round now. For your picture starter, you’re going to see a map of the Middle East. 10 points if you can identify the indicated city. BUZZER Damascus. No. BUZZER Lebanon. That’s a country. No, it’s Bethlehem. So, we’re going to take the picture bonuses in a moment or two. We’ll take another starter question in the meantime. Fingers on the buzzers, here it comes, for 10 points. Once described by Michael Foot as, “Passing from rising hope to elder statesman “without any intervening period whatsoever,” which future Liberal Party leader was first elected MP for Roxburgh, Selkirk and Peebles in 1965? BUZZER David Steele. Correct. APPLAUSE Right, so we go back to the picture round. You saw Bethlehem in the Middle East. As well as being a city there, it’s also the name of a number of towns and cities in the USA. For your bonuses, you’ll see a map of part of the USA with three states highlighted, each home to a Bethlehem of its own. Five points for each state you can name. Firstly, the state at A, please. Massachusetts. No, that’s Connecticut. Secondly, state B. Idaho. No, that’s Kentucky. And finally, state C. Pennsylvania. It is Pennsylvania, yes. APPLAUSE Right, 10 points for this. “His subjects are street scenes interpreted with technical means “as yet imperfect, but with real imagination.” These words, from the Manchester Guardian, refer to an early exhibition of works by which artist? BUZZER LS Lowry. It was LS Lowry, yes. APPLAUSE Just round the corner from this studio, in fact. Right, your bonuses are on children’s television. Six fireman were usually named in the roll call that featured in the 1967 animated series Trumpton. The first three were Pugh, Pugh and Barney McGrew. Which three followed? Cuthbert, Dibble and Grub. Very good. Secondly, for five points, in a series created in 1969 by Oliver Postgate’s Small Films company, what collective name was given to the beings who lived on a small blue planet, spoke in whistles, and ate green soup from the Soup Dragon? – The Clangers.
– Correct. First seen in 1971, which animated character’s adventures began in each episode with him leaving his home at number 52 Festive Road, and visiting a fancy dress shop? Mr Benn. Mr Benn is correct, yes. Right, 10 points for this starter question. What common name is given to the zygomatic bones of the human skeleton? High or prominent examples are often regarded as a desirable or fashionable trait. BUZZER – Cheek bones.
– Correct. APPLAUSE Right, Goldsmiths, these bonuses are on the poetry of the First World War. In each case, I’d like you to name the poet who wrote the following lines. Firstly, “If I were fierce and bald and short of breath, “I’d live with scarlet Majors at the Base “and speed glum heroes up the line to death.” – Siegfried Sassoon.
– Correct. Secondly, “As I went up by Ovillers, in mud and water cold to the knee “there went three jeering, fleering spectres “that walked abreast and talked of me.” – Wilfred Owen.
– No, that was Ivor Gurney. And finally, “What passing bells for these who die as cattle. “Only the monstrous anger of the guns.” Wilfred Owen. Indeed, the Anthem For Doomed Youth. So we come to the music round. For your music starter, you’ll hear a pop song that reached number one in the 1980s. 10 points if you can name the group performing. # The power of… # BUZZER Frankie Goes To Hollywood. It is Frankie Goes To Hollywood, yes. APPLAUSE Right, Holly Johnson, lead singer of Frankie Goes To Hollywood is one of several performers to share his name with this festive plant. For your bonuses, you’ll hear three more number ones by similarly named performers. In each case, name both the song and the singer for five points. Firstly… # There’s no use in me a-cryin’ # I’ve done everything and now I’m sick of tryin’ # I’ve thrown away my nights # And wasted all my days over you # Well you go your way # And I’ll go mine # Now and forever till the end of time # I’ll find somebody new… # You Don’t Matter Any More. Buddy Holly, You Don’t Matter Any More. No, it’s It Doesn’t Matter Any More. Sorry, you had the right performer though. It was Buddy Holly. Can’t give you the point though. Secondly… # Don’t go, I know you want to touch me # Here there and everywhere # Sparks fly when we are together # You can’t deny the facts of life # You don’t have to act like a star # Try your moves in the back of the car # Don’t you know that we can go far # Cos tonight you’re going to get my # Don’t play the games that you play… # We’ve got Holly Valance singing… ..something beginning with… – T.
– T. – We don’t know.
– No, it’s Kiss Kiss. I’m sorry, you don’t get the points there either. Finally, the name of this song and the band performing it. # The road is long… # BUZZER The Hollies, He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother. Correct, yes. Well done. Right, 10 points for this. A replica of Coco Chanel’s couch, a reclining chair and ottoman by Charles and Ray Eames and a collection of African and pre-Columbian art are housed in 1901 Elliot Bay Towers, Seattle, the apartment of which fictional character? BUZZER Frasier Crane. Frasier Crane is correct, yes. APPLAUSE So you get a set of bonuses, Goldsmiths, on multiple discoveries. Get them, you’ll take the lead. In the 1770s, which element was isolated in quick succession by an English cleric who thought it was laughing gas, a French chemist who first believed he’d purified air and a Swedish pharmacist who correctly identified it as a component of air? – Helium.
– No, it’s oxygen. Secondly, the discovery of which branch of mathematics was the subject of a fierce battle between Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz? Newton referred to it as the theory of fluxions. Pure mathematics. No, it’s calculus. And finally, a paper presented to the Linnean Society of London on July 1st 1858 brought together the independent research of the naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and which fellow scientist? 1850 something. Try Darwin. Darwin. Charles Darwin is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Another starter question. An electrographic vote recorder on October 13th 1868 and a holder for an article to be electroplated on January 6th 1931 were the first and last of the 1,093 US patents to be issued to which inventor? BUZZER – Thomas Edison.
– Correct. APPLAUSE So you re-take the lead and your bonuses are on the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Firstly, for five points, the 2014 tournament saw an unusually long succession of matches before the first draw occurred. How many had been played before the goalless draw between Iran and Nigeria? You can have one either way. What? LAUGHTER I’m drawing a blank here. I don’t know. Eight groups, so let’s say 15. – 15.
– No, it was 12. In addition to England, two former World Cup winners were eliminated at the group stages of the 2014 tournament. Please name both of them. – France.
– Spain. Spain, definitely. And, erm… – France.
– No.
– Italy? Brazil? Italy. Shall we go for that? – Italy and Spain.
– Correct. Finally, which unfancied team topped England’s group and then went on to the quarterfinals where they lost on penalties to the Netherlands? – Costa Rica.
– It’s Costa Rica. Costa Rica’s correct. Right, 10 points for this. The small village of Sennen lies close to which extremity of the United Kingdom. BUZZER – Land’s End.
– Correct. APPLAUSE These bonuses could put you back on top, Goldsmiths. They’re on Scottish islands. The Queen of the Hebrides is a name that has been given to which island, the southernmost of the Inner Hebrides noted for its whisky distilleries? – Arran.
– No, it’s Islay. Goat Fell is the highest point on which island, the largest in the Firth of Clyde? Its varied topography has led to it being called Scotland in miniature. – Mull.
– No, that was Arran. And finally, after Skye, which is the second largest of the Inner Hebrides? It lies in the Argyll and Bute Council area and its highest point is the Munro Ben More. Jura. No, it’s Mull. Right, time for another picture round. For your picture starter, you’re going to see a painting. 10 points if you can give me the name of the artist to whom it’s usually attributed. BUZZER Oh, my God, erm… No, I’ve forgotten, sorry. I’ve gone mad. Bad luck. BUZZER Whistler. No, it’s Sir Henry Raeburn. So, we’ll take the picture bonuses in a moment or two. Oh, dear. A professor at the Royal Academy, too. LAUGHTER There’s no hiding place, you know? Right, we’re going to take another starter question then we’ll come back to the picture bonuses in a moment or two, unless you’re very lucky. So, 10 points for this. Fingers on the buzzers. Published posthumously in 1977 and ’79 respectively, the works of which French-born author and diarist include Delta Of Venus and Little Birds? BUZZER Anais Nin. Anais Nin is correct, yes. APPLAUSE So, the famous skating clergyman was the starter that everybody failed to identify the painter of. Your picture bonus is three more paintings on the theme of ice skating. In each case, I simply want the name of the artist, please. Firstly, for five, this French artist. Matisse? Just say Matisse. We’ve got to be careful cos we’ll get it wrong. Matisse. No, that’s by Renoir. Secondly, this German artist. I know that. – Gustav… What’s he called?
– Klimt? He’s the only German artist I know. We don’t know. That’s Ernst Kirchner, and, finally, this Flemish artist. Is that Bruegel? It might be Hieronymus Bosch. Hieronymus Bosch. No, it was Bruegel the Elder. 10 points for this. Originally meaning raw or untwisted silk thread, what five-letter word is most commonly associated with spun sugar at fairgrounds and with a generic… BUZZER Candy. No, I’m afraid you lose five points. And with a generic dental hygiene product. BUZZER – Floss.
– Correct, yes. APPLAUSE You get a set of bonuses on the actor Warren Clarke who died in November 2014. One of Warren Clarke’s early film roles was as Dim, a droog of Alex in which 1971 film by Stanley Kubrick? – Clockwork Orange.
– Correct. Clarke starred alongside Haydn Gwynne in a television adaptation of the 1988 novel Nice Work, set in a fictionalised version of Birmingham. Who wrote the novel on which it was based? We don’t know. He’s a school teacher. Nice Work. He does loads of books. – Is your answer you don’t know or…
– We’re not sure. Well, then I’m afraid that won’t do, it’s David Lodge. Five points for this if you can get it. Warren Clarke is perhaps best known for playing the lead role in which police drama series based on books by Reginald Hill? Dalziel and Pascoe. Dalziel and Pascoe. Dalziel and Pascoe is correct. Four minutes to go, 10 points for this. Seeking ways to explore the formation of opinion and responses to media, the US sociologist Robert K Merton created which research tool now widely used in commerce… BUZZER – Opinion poll.
– No, you lose five points, I’m afraid. ..now widely used in commerce and politics and known by a two-word name? BUZZER Where you have a class of… No, that’s not going to do. No, no, no. You’re really well over the two-word term, matey. – It’s a focus group.
– Focus group, that’s it. LAUGHTER That’s what I was going to say. Right, another starter question. Give the final two digits of the years that saw the battles of Neuve Chapelle, Loos, Agincourt and Waterloo. BUZZER One five. 15 is correct, yes. APPLAUSE Right, your bonuses are on the Australian artist Sidney Nolan. Nolan was born in 1917 in which Australian city? It underwent a significant rise in population after the gold rush of 1852 and has come to be regarded as Australia’s cultural capital. – It must be Sydney.
– Canberra? – Come on.
– Sydney. No, it’s Melbourne. From 1946, Nolan worked on a series of paintings depicting events in the life of which bush ranger and cattle thief who was hanged in 1880? – Ned Kelly.
– Correct. In 1978, Nolan presented a series of works to the Australian War Memorial depicting which formative event in Australian history? It became a recurrent theme of his work. – Gallipoli.
– Gallipoli. Gallipoli is correct. Couple of minutes to go and 10 points for this. “Be advised, my passport’s green. “No glass of ours was ever raised to toast the Queen.” These are lines by which Irish poet and Nobel laureate? BUZZER Brendan Behan. No, anyone like to buzz from Goldsmiths? BUZZER Samuel Beckett. No, it’s Seamus Heaney. 10 points for this. Now more usually applied to politicians and sporting figures, what term for a determined non-conformist derives from the name of a 19th-century Texas cattle baron… BUZZER – Maverick.
– Maverick is right. Your bonuses this time are on the rivers of Northern Ireland. Firstly, for five points, forming much of the border between County Antrim and County Down, which river flows through Belfast into the Irish Sea? Come on, we need an answer here, please. We’re running out of time. – Don’t know.
– It’s the Lagan. The longest in Northern Ireland, which river flows from the south-east to the north-west of the country via Lough Neagh? Er… – We don’t know.
– That’s the River Bann, and finally, sharing its name with the city’s local BBC radio station, which river is noted for its salmon and sea trout and flows through Derry into the Atlantic Ocean? – We don’t know either.
– That’s the River Foyle. 10 points for this. What surname links a founder of the Algonquin Round Table, the partner of Clyde Barrow… BUZZER Dorothy Parker. No, I’m afraid you lose five points. Clyde Barrow, and the actress best known for her role as Carrie Bradshaw? BUZZER Oh, my God. I’ve forgot. What’s her name? Sex And The City. Sex And The City Woman. LAUGHTER – No, all I want…
– Sarah Jessica Parker. No, that’s wrong as well. – I asked you for the surname.
– Parker. END OF GAME GONG Dorothy Parker was wrong, as you’re wrong. I’m sorry. You were asked for the surname. LAUGHTER What a damp squib on which to end a very exciting contest. Well, Goldsmiths, bad luck. You didn’t disgrace yourselves. – Yeah, we did.
– Yes, YOU did. You disgraced yourself, but the team didn’t as a whole, and Manchester Metropolitan, 145 is a perfectly respectable score. It won’t be high enough, I’m afraid, to come back as one of the four highest scorers, however… Take your cup. There’s no point trying to hide you identity, you’ve got it in front of you. Manchester Metropolitan, 145’s perfectly all right. So, we now know the four teams who are through to the semifinals. They are the Universities of Edinburgh and Hull, Lady Margaret Hall Oxford and Trinity Hall Cambridge. I hope you can join me next time for the first of those semifinals but until then it’s goodbye from Goldsmiths College London. ALL: Goodbye. It’s goodbye from Manchester Metropolitan University. ALL: Goodbye. And it’s goodbye from me. Goodbye. APPLAUSE