UMBC Graduate Commencement Spring 2018

UMBC Graduate Commencement Spring 2018

October 17, 2019 1 By Stanley Isaacs


(MUSIC)>>:The graduate school is led
by the graduate school marshal, Dr. Jeffrey
Halverson, associate dean of the graduate school, and Ms.
Rose Belanger, who is receiving her Ph.D. in applied
developmental psychology today. She is carrying the
graduate school banner. (MUSIC)>>:The procession of graduate
students is led by the students’ marshal, Dr. Marc
Zupan, the 2017 recipient of the Presidential Teaching
Professor award and Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering and Graduate Program Director. (MUSIC)>>:The faculty and staff
procession is led by the faculty marshal Dr. Sarah
Shin, the 2017 Presidential Research Professor, and
professor of education and special assistant to the
provost for academic initiatives. She is joined by
staff marshal Ms. Wendy Martin, the 2017 recipient of
the Presidential Distinguished Staff Award for Professional
Staff and director of technology development, and
Ms. Cheryl Johnson, the 2012 recipient of Presidential
Distinguished Staff Award for Non-Exempt Staff and grant
specialist for the Office of Contract and Branch
Accounting. The faculty, staff and students’ marshal are
carrying batons that the UMBC Alumni Association gave to the
university in honor of our 40th anniversary in 2006. (MUSIC)>>:The Platform Party is led
by the grand marshal Dr. Kimberly Moffitt, president of
the Faculty Senate and associate professor of
American Studies and the Language, Literacy and Culture
Ph.D. program. The grand marshal carries the university
mace, a symbol of presidential authority, used only on formal
academic occasions, and is carried in the procession
immediately before the president. UMBC’s mace was
commissioned by the Alumni Association for UMBC’s 20th
anniversary in 1986. (MUSIC)>>:The 78th commencement
exercises of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County,
graduate school will now be in order. Ladies and Gentlemen,
please rise for our national anthem, sung by Ms. Dana
Pirzchalski, a senior graduating tomorrow with a
major in vocal performance. Ms. Pirzchalski will pursue
her master’s in vocal pedagogy at Belmont University in
Nashville, Tenn., and she is honored to represent the music
department. Gentlemen, please remove your hats or caps
during the anthem. Ladies and Gentlemen, let us begin.>>:(Singing) Oh, say, can you
see, by the dawn’s early light, what so proudly we hail
at the twilight’s last gleaming? Whose broad stripes
and bright stars through the perilous fight o’er the
ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? And the
rockets red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof
through the night that our flag was still there. Oh, say,
does that star-spangled banner yet wave o’er the land of the
free and the home of the brave? (APPLAUSE)>>:Ladies and Gentlemen, it is
my pleasure – please be seated. Ladies and Gentlemen,
it is my pleasure to introduce the vice provost and dean of
our graduate school, Dr. Janet Rutledge. (APPLAUSE)>>:Good morning.>>:Good morning.>>:President Hrabowski and
distinguished guests, first, I would like to recognize our
soloist Ms. Dana Pirzchalski. Thank you, Dana, for a
beautiful, beautiful rendition. (APPLAUSE)>>:And we wish you all the
best in your future plans. Today, we gather together in a
time-honored tradition shared across the world in saluting
the attainment of the standards of advanced graduate
study. This ceremonial tradition of the conferral of
master’s and doctoral degrees is one that provides a
universal currency signifying the highest standard of the
achievement in the disciplines, subjects and
professions sponsored by UMBC. This is one of life’s happiest
and most significant milestones for each of today’s
graduates. It is a milestone, not only for those earning
degrees, but for all of us here today. For the graduates
seated in front of me, it signifies the completion of
your master’s or doctoral degree and the acceptance of
new and ever more challenging horizons. For the faculty and
staff, the event serves as a capstone for all they have
shared with you and brings special joy at seeing your
personal success. And for the many families and friends here
today, it is a moment in which we can all share,
acknowledging the recognition that you, our soon-to-be
graduates, so richly deserve. And for me and many others, it
is a special moment during which we can witness the
fruits of the many labors in our community and take pride
in the remarkable work that goes on here at UMBC. During
the ceremony, those of you receiving degrees will
transition from being students to being alumni. Whatever
career pathway you choose, you represent the very best of the
future. You have bark – embarked on one of the most
important journeys of your lives, and we are all very,
very proud of you. The degree earned from UMBC reflects
significant achievement, often involving substantial personal
sacrifice and struggle. For the pursuit of new knowledge
and understanding involves growth and change. As we pay
tribute to you today, we recognize, too, those who have
supported you during your studies at UMBC. We know how
much support your families and friends have provided
throughout this experience. This is their day, too. We
come together, also, to acknowledge the faculty and
staff who have encouraged, mentored and inspired you to
achieve your very best at UMBC. By honoring you, our
graduates, we pay tribute to their artful craft of leading
you to this day. Please give all of those who have
supported you during these important years a round of
applause. (APPLAUSE)>>:Nelson Mandela wisely
stated, “I have discovered the secret that after climbing a
great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills
to climb.” This famous quote has taken on many meetings
over the years. On this day, we salute all that you’ve
achieved. And to paraphrase Mandela, we encourage you to
steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds you on
the top of this great hill and to look back on the distance
you have come to arrive at this day. And like Mandela,
you have many more hills to climb. For today, we also
celebrate the commencement of all you have yet to achieve.
Congratulations from all of us. Before we move into the
program today, let me first briefly acknowledge some of
the people on the platform. Joining us are the deans of
our colleges and schools, members of the president’s
council, presidents of the campus senate and Presidential
Award recipients.>>:Can you all stand up and
applaud? (APPLAUSE)>>:It is now my pleasure to
introduce Regent Linda Gooden, a member of the University
System of Maryland Board of Regents. Regent Gooden will
deliver greetings on behalf of the regents.>>:Good Morning. Good morning. (APPLAUSE)>>:I am delighted to join you
and extend best wishes and congratulations from the
University System Board of Regents on this momentous
occasion. It is an honor to share this day with President
Freeman Hrabowski, who has done a tremendous job leading
this campus. Under his guidance, UMBC joined the
ranks of the nation’s very best public universities. And
you also had a very successful basketball season. (APPLAUSE)>>:I am also pleased to share
this day with your commencement speaker, Erin
O’Shea, Harvard University professor and the president of
the Howard Universe – Howard Hughes Medical Institute. I
look forward to her remarks. Most importantly, it is an
honor to be here to congratulate you, the graduate
degree candidates. When you have – what you have
accomplished takes hard work, persistence, dedication and
time. Congratulations. Pursuing an education is
always a challenge, no matter the circumstances. Pursuing
one while balancing a career, or family responsibilities, or
both, as many of you have done, is an amazing feat.
Today, your – you graduate from an institution that is
recognized nationally and internationally for
excellence. No matter what direction your life takes, no
matter when you face challenges, you will next –
the challenges you confront – you will know that your
education from UMBC has prepared you well. Once again,
congratulations and best wishes for the years to come. (APPLAUSE)>>:Thank you, Regent Gooden,
for your remarks and for the support of the board of
regents. Now I would like to introduce Mr. Roy Prouty,
president of the Graduate Student Association. Roy has
completed a master’s degree in Atmospheric Physics, and he is
currently pursuing a second master’s degree in computer
science. Roy. (APPLAUSE)>>:Thank you. Thank you. So I
think we’re at five so far for – so here’s six. Good morning,
Everyone. It’s really an honor to be able to be up here
addressing all of you and to be able to keep all of you
from your diplomas for another, I’m hoping it’s just
three minutes, but – really, it’s an honor to be able to
address you as some of the first additions to the UMBC
class of 2018. For many of you, today is the culmination
of many years of hard work, and now you’re off into the
world. For many others, this is a big step in the right
direction, as you continue your hardwork to excel here at
UMBC or just academia in general. But for all of you,
today’s a day where you can just sit back and breathe.
Grades are in. Advisers have signed off. Committees have
approved. Relax, but not for too long. There’s still work
to do. We’re all college graduates here or at least
related to one. And so we know that today’s society – that we
know that if nothing else, today’s society is one where
decisions, both good and bad, can be made at lightning
speed. And what’s worse – it’s been made abundantly clear
that not all information is created equal. These documents
you are about to receive, either on this stage or in
first-class mail, they represent mastery, expertise.
With this, I task you to communicate, to advocate and
to enrich. Do your best to convey the impact of your
work. Communicate with peers and novices alike. Spark
interest in others. Bring your field into the spotlight.
Advocate for your work and for your passions. Above all, and
to the best of your ability, aim to enrich the lives and
experiences of those around you. All in all, do good
things. On behalf of the GSA, please know that we are proud
of how far you’ve gotten, but because success is never
final, we’re even more excited to see each of you push
forward on the path ahead of you, to continue to make big
breakthroughs, forge new partnerships and transform
lives. Thank you and congratulations. (APPLAUSE)>>:Thank you, Roy, for your
inspiring words and for the collaborative support of the
Graduate Student Association. The GSA really does a lot to
add to community and to the success of all of our graduate
students here at UMBC. And now I am pleased to introduce
UMBC’s provost and senior vice president, Dr. Philip Rous,
who serves as our chief academic officer. Dr. Rouse
joined UMBC in 1990. He is a professor in our department of
physics and has served as dean of the College of Natural and
Mathematical Sciences. Dr. Rouse. (APPLAUSE)>>:Good morning, Everybody. On
behalf of the scholarly community we call our UMBC, I
extend my congratulations to our graduates. Of course, we
had very high expectations when we welcomed you as a
member of the UMBC community. And those expectations were
based upon your promise as scholars. Today, we celebrate
your fulfillment of that promise. This ceremony reminds
me of the words of G.K. Chesterton – that education is
simply the soul of a society as it passes from one
generation to another. So today, we acknowledge not only
your accomplishment but also, in some sense, the passing of
the torch from one generation to another. Today, you will
join our community of UMBC alumni, who dedicate their
lives to making a difference by advancing our understanding
of our own humanity, our democracy, the natural world
that surrounds us. And your achievement represents not
just your academic accomplishments but the
friendships you formed, the faculty who nurtured you and
the family and friends who supported you and helped you
arrive here today. So I hope you will see your achievement
as emerging from within the context of a community, a
community that knows you and cares about you. So as you
look to the future, I believe that your fulfillment will
derive from making the most of whatever talents have been
bestowed upon each of you. And it lies in extending, to the
farthest limits, the resources of your mind and of your
heart. In conclusion, I would like to leave you with my
final salutation. And this is it – may you each enjoy a life
rich in the knowledge that each day your work and your
relationships have truly made a difference. Congratulations. (APPLAUSE)>>:Thank you Dr. Rous. It is
with great pleasure that I introduce Dr. Freeman
Hrabowski, president of UMBC. Serving for over 25 years as
president, Dr. Hrabowski has brought tremendous energy,
vision and leadership to this institution. He has helped
connect the university with individuals, companies,
foundations and agencies that have brought new resources to
build and sustain distinctive programs in undergraduate
education and graduate education and research. Dr.
Hrabowski. (APPLAUSE)>>:For the eighth time, good
morning.>>:Good morning.>>:Good morning, again.>>:Good morning.>>:I want a little life here.
Sometimes with the undergraduates, you calm
things down. But with you, I’ll lift it up a bit, all
right? I am delighted today to take a moment and welcome you
to this ceremony and to say you represent the first group
having this exercise in this new facility. Give the setting
a round of applause. (APPLAUSE)>>:This is the first time
we’ve brought commencement exercises back to campus in 20
years. And we’ll be having two of these tomorrow for
undergraduates. This dignified ceremony is very special to
our students, our families and the university. And as we
celebrate today, we ask you to remain here until the end of
the ceremony and to give all others respect by listening
carefully as they enjoy seeing their students, their faculty
members come across the stage. First, the older I get,
Graduates, the more I realize that there’s nothing in our
lives more important than our families and friends. And so
I’m going to ask the graduates to get to their feet and allow
themselves to applaud their family members and friends in
the audience. Could you graduates get up and let them
know how much you care? (APPLAUSE)>>:Now, Families, as they
stand up – Families – stand up, Families. Families, come
on, get up. Families, get up. Families – and Friends, stand
up, also. Stand up also. Give us a little energy. Stand up.
Stand up. Good (laughter). Now, yeah, now, that’s what I
wanted. Yup. Yup, yup. That’s wonderful. And now I’m going
to ask – we’ll do it this way – I want all the faculty and
staff to stand, and I want us to give them a round of
applause for all that they’ve done to support you,
Graduates. Please give them a big round of applause. (APPLAUSE)>>:Some of our graduates are
actually members of our staff and have worked really hard
balancing the two. If you are in the graduating class today
and a staff member, stand. Let me see who you are. Please
stand. And give them a round of applause, wherever they are
– yes. And now I’m going to ask students who are
graduating who are veterans or members of the military to
stand. And if you’re in the audience and you are a veteran
or a member of the military, please stand to let us give
all of you a round of applause. Thank you for your
service. We’re honored that you’re here. And now I’m going
to ask all those students who are already teachers or are
becoming teachers – graduating. The teachers,
please stand. Anybody who’s going to be a teacher, please
stand. Give them a big round of applause (laughter). A
surprising one. If you are in the audience and you are an
alumnus or alumna of UMBC, stand. All the alumni of UMBC,
please stand. Please stand. Anybody who – alumni. I am
delighted to talk about the entire class. All of you
receiving master’s and Ph.D.s are going to do great things.
You have received all kinds of prestigious awards. You’re
going onto the most prestigious of post-doctoral
fellowships. You are joining the faculties and research
positions in institutions, universities, and others.
Others of you will be working in companies and
organizations. Wherever you go, we know that you will be
making a difference, and so I’m going to ask you to just
take a moment and savor this experience. Sometimes, when we
are finished something, we are quickly moving on to the next
thing. Take a moment and enjoy it today with families and
friends around you. It doesn’t get any better than this.
Enjoy it and remember it in those challenging moments,
please. Remember this experience. We’re going to –
we never stop learning. And I saw a face who came over to me
and spoke this morning and she’s earning a Ph.D. at the
age of 65. Shirley Dunlap, stand up and let them see who
you are. I’m really proud. (Laughter) In the L.L.C. –
very proud of you. Very, very proud of you. That’s
wonderful. It really is. Before we introduce our
honorary degree speaker, I want to let you know – all of
you – just how inspired we are today. You can go to the home
page and read some of the stories that are there. They
are very, very special. And now I’m going to ask our
provost to come and – who will be helping us in the bestowing
of the honorary degree. The provost has been here 28
years. He’s a theoretical physicist. Give him a round of
applause. He’s a great guy (laughter). (APPLAUSE)>>:Thank you so much. We will
now confer our honorary degree. Dr. Erin K. O’Shea,
please rise and step forward. The sixth president and first
woman president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Dr.
Erin O’Shea is driving science and science education forward.
Under Dr. O’Shea’s leadership, HHMI has reaffirmed its
commitment to science and research by investing in
scientists, educators, and students to make
transformational change throughout the field. She is a
staunch advocate for greater diversity and inclusion in the
scientific workforce and works tirelessly in her role as
leader and scientist to train, support, and nurture talent
from all backgrounds. She continually shares these
innovative approaches with academic institutions in the
hope of challenging and changing the status quo. Dr.
O’Shea is an elected member of the National Academy of
Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the
American Academy of Microbiology. She is a fellow
of the American Society for Cell Biology and the National
Academy of Inventors. In 2017, Washingtonian magazine named
her one of Washington’s 100 most powerful women. Dr.
O’Shea holds a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from
Smith College and earned her Ph.D. in chemistry from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We are proud,
today, to honor Dr. Erin O’Shea with an honorary Doctor
of Science degree for her exemplary work advancing
diversity and inclusion in science and science education. (APPLAUSE)>>:Now, therefore, by the
virtue of the authority vested in me by the state of Maryland
and given to me by the Chancellor of the University
System of Maryland and upon the unanimous vote of the
Board of Regents, I confer upon you the degree of Doctor
of Science honoris causa together with all the rights
and privileges thereunto pertaining. Congratulations,
Dr. O’Shea. Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in
welcoming her. Let me just say that she represents a
foundation that has $21 billion and we are delighted
to be affiliated. Dr. Erin O’Shea (laughter). (APPLAUSE)>>:OK. Well, I’m just thrilled
to be here and I want to thank both Provost Rouse and also
President Hrabowski for this honor and for the kind
introduction. So I want to add, for the tenth time, a
good morning to all of you. To the graduates, to the faculty
and staff, distinguished guests, family members, and
friends. It’s really great to be here in this beautiful new
event center. And, as was referred to before, not only
is this a terrific setting for a commencement ceremony, it
seems like it’s a pretty good place to watch a
history-making basketball team play. So – awesome. So, it was
exciting to see UMBC in the media spotlight this year and
to see that so much well-deserved attention was
given to your academic programs alongside the
athletic accolades. It’s remarkable how fast UMBC has
grown and become one of the nation’s top universities. You
set an outstanding example for other institutions to follow.
As Provost Rous mentioned, I’m president of the Howard Hughes
Medical Institute. So I’d like to take a few moments to
recognize UMBC’S and HHMI’s shared history. As you know,
inclusive excellence is a hallmark of the UMBC
experience. And, similarly, HHMI seeks to foster inclusive
excellence in science and science education through the
people and the programs that we support. Some of you may be
familiar with HHMI’s Science Education Alliance – or SEA
program, which gives faculty members the opportunity to
provide authentic course-based research experiences to
undergraduates. UMBC was part of the very first SEA cohort
in 2007 and, to date, more than 700 UMBC students have
received hands-on training in genomics research as a result.
But our relationship with UMC goes back much further than
2007. In the 1990s, HHMI investigator and UMBC faculty
member Mike Summers, who has students graduating here
today, was mentoring undergraduates who were part
of a really revolutionary new initiative at UMBC – the
Meyerhoff Scholars Program. And this program, which many
of you may have read about in the Baltimore Sun last week,
was designed to provide support, mentoring, and
research experience to African-American students who
were committed to getting Ph.D.s in STEM – science,
technology, engineering, and math. This program was a
result of Freeman’s dedication to fostering diversity in STEM
and financial support from the Meyerhoff’s. Mike Summers
applied for support from HHMI to send these Meyerhoff
Scholars to other schools to conduct research in HHMI
investigator labs. And the goal here was to give the
scholars from UMBC opportunities to travel, to
work in new environments, but also, and equally importantly,
to introduce researchers at other institutions to the
exceptional dedication and talent of students who’ve been
traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields. And so, for
decades since, under Freeman’s inspirational leadership, the
Meyerhoff Scholars Undergraduate Program has
become a true national model for increasing STEM diversity.
And HHMI is proud and really excited to be supporting our
efforts to replicate this program at other institutions.
And I should mention, in the last 15 years, the Meyerhoff
Graduate Program has supported more than 100 STEM Ph.D.
students from underrepresented groups, 16 of whom are getting
ready to walk across the stage today. So congratulations to
all of you. So recently I had the great pleasure of getting
to know Freeman. Not only is your president a model for
those of us who want to foster STEM, diversity, and
inclusion, Freeman is, as I’m sure all of you here would
agree, a great personal role model. Something I admire –
absolutely. Something I really admire about Freeman is that,
no matter what room he’s in, no matter who his audience is,
Freeman remains true to himself and to his values. And
I think this is relevant, because when I think about
enhancing diversity and inclusion I think about
creating environments in which everyone can be true to him or
herself and where the unique individual is welcomed and
supported. I expect that your years at UMBC have
demonstrated the value of feeling included and making
others feel included. I was lucky enough to have that
experience as an undergraduate. I grew up in a
small working-class town of about 5,000 people in upstate
New York in between Rochester and Buffalo. And, honestly, it
was a homogeneous community. It wasn’t diverse in terms of
ethnicities, cultures, or world views. And then I went
off to Smith College, an all-women’s liberal arts
college in Massachusetts. At Smith I was immersed in a very
different environment, one that was intensely accepting
and very diverse, and I loved it. I loved it because it gave
me the freedom to be myself. And when I left there, I felt
like I could be anything I wanted to be. But, just as
importantly, Smith exposed me to perspectives that were, at
times, wildly different than my own. And so I developed an
appreciation for diverse viewpoints. And this may be
the most important thing, I also learned to listen to and
to value what other people have to say. Research has
shown that diversity is critical to problem solving.
That a diverse group of people will come up with more
innovative solutions than a group lacking diversity. But
the only way that works is if everyone in the group is
listening as well as contributing. Listening to
others, putting yourself in someone else’s shoes – it’s
not always easy. It’s especially difficult when
you’ve had to fight so hard to get a seat at the table or if
you’re still trying to find that seat. You’ve spent your
time at UMBC hearing about the importance of grit – true grit
and of resilience – of punching above your weight.
You’ve had to exceed expectations that others had
for you and, perhaps, even expectations you had for
yourself. You’ve worked so hard and, perhaps, overcome
some very big obstacles along the way. I appreciated
Freeman’s quote in a New York Times article after your men’s
basketball team defeated Virginia. He said, “if you
work hard, there can be these special moments where you’re
moving toward greatness.” In those special moments, like
this one today, you see what can be and you expect to be
heard. But when you step out those doors today, don’t just
seek out the places where you know you will have a voice.
Consider how you can create inclusive spaces and special
moments for others where you can listen as well as be
heard. I know that this approach has made me a better
scientist and scholar, a better teacher and mentor, and
a better leader. When I became president of HHMI in 2016, I
had the opportunity to establish a vision for the
institute. I spent a lot of time thinking about what it
actually means to foster diversity and inclusion in
science and science education. And the obvious answer is that
it means providing opportunities, through
programmatic and financial support, so that all students
who want to can develop their scientific talent. And we’re
making those efforts. But it also means establishing
environments where individuals feel a sense of belonging and
feel valued for who they are as unique individuals and for
their contributions. And much of that work starts at home,
in our own labs and operations at HHMI. If we are successful,
that effort will surely contribute to the success of
the people in whom we invest resources. But as Winston
Churchill – and also Freeman – would say, “success is never
final.” It’s important that we take the time to reflect on
what we achieved as Freeman pointed out as well. Enjoy
those special moments, like you most certainly should be
doing today. But we must never stop looking ahead to the next
milestone. Never stop asking yourself, how can I do more to
make this world a better place? Actively and
intentionally consider the issues that will improve your
life and the life of others. Actively and intentionally
listen to other people. Actively and intentionally be
true to the qualities that you value in yourself. Last year,
UMBC was chosen to be one of 10 institutions to
host a truth, racial healing, and transformation campus
center, which, according to the Association of American
Colleges and Universities, is meant to empower people to
live and prosper in a civil and humane society that
promotes full inclusion for everyone. Isn’t that really
what it’s all about? Seeking truth, empowering others,
bettering humanity, and including everyone. At HHMI,
we say we make long-term investments in individuals to
seek scientific truth for the betterment of humanity. And
what that really means is that we believe in the power of the
individual to see what is and what can be and to make the
world a better place for everyone. As I look around
this room, I see a lot of powerful individuals. I see
individuals who are true to themselves. I see individuals
who will have a seat at the table and who will pull up a
chair for others. I see individuals who can listen and
who will be heard. I see individuals moving toward
greatness. Thank you, again, for this honor, and good luck
to all of you, graduates.>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:One more round of applause
for one of America’s great science leaders.>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:Graduates, there would be
no way for Erin to speak with such decency and humanity if
she hadn’t been grounded in the arts and humanities and
social sciences from that liberal arts experience at
Smith. We have graduates today from the sciences and from
expertise in theater and language and culture and
public policy and human psychology, and so the message
from me, as I listen to her, has everything to do with the
notion that, of those to whom much is given, much is
required. You represent the top 5 percent of human beings
in the world in terms of education. And the challenge
we face is to connect to those who may not be in this
category. I have every confidence you will do that.
Before moving ahead, it is only appropriate that we take
a moment and thank our own Howard Hughes Investigator,
member of the National Academy of Sciences, who’s here for
his students today, Mike Summers. Mike, would you stand
so we can tell you we love you? (Laughter) Thank you so
much. We will now move to the part of the program when we
confer the Ph.D. and master’s degrees.>>:Will the candidates for the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy please rise.>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:Dr. Hrabowski.>>:Dr. Rutledge.>>:Dr. Hrabowski, I have the
honor of presenting the candidates recommended by the
faculty of the University of Maryland Graduate School,
Baltimore for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the
highest earned degree for which any university has the
power to confer.>>:Upon the recommendation of
the faculty and by the authority of the state of
Maryland given to the Board of Regents and the chancellor of
the University System of Maryland and, by them,
entrusted to me, I hereby admit you to the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy which you have earned during the course
of your studies at the University of Maryland
graduate school, Baltimore in token whereof you shall be
given a diploma with all of the honors privileges and
responsibilities thereunto pertaining.>>:Thank you, and please be
seated.>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:Today, all of our graduates
will receive a special congratulatory memento from
the UMBC Alumni Association. Dr. Damian Doyle, a member of
the Alumni Association board, will greet you and present
this to you as you return to your seats. And, now, will the
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy please
proceed, with their mentors, to the platform to receive
their diplomas. And others please remain seated until
your row has been escorted to the stage. Inte’a DeShields, language literacy and culture, being hooded by her mentor,
Dr. Craig Saper. Dr. DeShields examined media reports that
criticized the intellectual aptitude of African-American
college debaters, and these reports, across the political
spectrum, erased the specific achievement of the national
champion black women debaters. She is currently teaching
English at Morgan State University and continuing her
work as a socio-cultural entrepreneur. (APPLAUSE)>>:Shirley Basfield Dunlap, language literacy and culture, being hooded by her
mentors, Dr. Beverly Bickel and Dr. Michelle Scott. Dr.
Basfield Dunlap’s oral history documented the contribution of
African-American stage directors to American and
African-American theater history. Her planned book on
African-American stage directors will lead to a
documentary film. She will continue teaching and
directing plays in her role as Associate Professor of Theater
Arts at Morgan State University. (APPLAUSE)>>:Teresa Bass Foster, language literacy and culture, being hooded by her
mentor Dr. Marjoleine Kars. Dr. Foster researched early
18th century British convict transportation to the Maryland
colony. She examined the familiar effect of this
British judicial punishment through an examination of the
experiences of transported convict women. She is
currently teaching history courses at Howard Community
College and continues her research and writing on this
topic. (APPLAUSE)>>:Erin Roth, language literacy and culture, being hooded by her mentor, Dr. J. Kevin Eckert. Dr. Roth’s
research explored the emotional practices that link
chronic diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes with
adverse childhood experiences. She plans to continue her
affiliation with UMBC as a research scientist in the
center for aging studies in the Department of Sociology,
Anthropology and Health Administration and Policy. (APPLAUSE)>>:Afsoon Saadin, molecular and cell biology, being hooded by
her mentor, Dr. Michelle Starz-Gaiano. Dr. Saadin
researched mechanisms that control cell decision making
during animal development. She genetically identified novel
molecules that enable certain cells to move. She
characterized new regulators of a genetic pathway that is
required for normal development and is
misregulated in cancer and immune disorders. She will
pursue post-doctoral training in biomedical science. (APPLAUSE)>>:Rose Belanger, applied developmental psychology,
being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Susan Sonnenscheim. Dr.
Belanger used quantitative analyses to identify robust
predictors of risk for and resilience to postpartum
depression in mothers of infants who required NICU
hospitalization. Dr. Belanger is currently extending her
work in family and community wellbeing through social and
economic justice initiatives in the nonprofit sector. (APPLAUSE)>>:Amber Mendres-Smith, applied developmental psychology,
being hooded by her mentor, Dr. John Borrero. Dr.
Mendres-Smith studied the effectiveness of a video she
created to educate parents about infant safe sleep and
tummy time and evaluated interventions to improve
infant tolerance of tummy time. She plans to extend her
research to premature infants in the University of Maryland
Children’s Hospital NICU. (APPLAUSE)>>:Caroline Demro, human services psychology, being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Jason
Schiffman. Dr. Demro used MRI brain imaging technology to
research biological markers of risk for psychosis. She is
currently completing her clinical internship at Harvard
Medical School within the Massachusetts Mental Health
Center. She has accepted a post-doctoral fellowship at
the University of Minnesota to continue her research on
schizophrenia. (APPLAUSE)>>:Meagan Graydon, human services psychology,
being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Carlo DiClemente. Dr.
Graydon investigated how drinkers’ motivation to
change, cravings, and self-efficacy play a role in
changing their attentional bias for alcohol-related cues.
She will be a clinical health psychology post-doctoral
fellow at the Veterans Affairs of Maryland health care
system, working in the areas of HIV and liver diseases. (APPLAUSE)>>:Tahira Mahdi, human services psychology, being hooded by
her mentor, Dr. Kenneth Maton. Dr. Mahdi examined the concept
of community membership by studying the go-go music
culture community and developed the conceptual
framework called being of the community. Dr. Mahdi is a
consultant on community collaboration projects,
researching applications of this work and publicizing and
disseminating it among non-academic communities. (APPLAUSE)>>:Ling Cao, biological sciences, being hooded by her mentor,
Dr. Philip Farabaugh. Dr. Cao’s research focused on how
accurate protein translation is in mammalian cells. She
also developed a new system to detect errors during protein
translation in yeast cells. She will pursue opportunities
in both translational and clinical research in the
future. (APPLAUSE)>>:Kartikeya Joshi, biological sciences, being
hooded by his mentor, Dr. Philip Farabaugh. Dr. Joshi
established the role of modifications of the protein
synthetic apparatus in accurate protein synthesis in
yeast by developing a novel bioluminescent-based assay. He
is currently a scientist at PGDX, developing assays based
on next-generation DNA sequencing to further the
field of personalized medicine for cancer patient treatment. (APPLAUSE)>>:Mary Donohue, biological sciences, being hooded by her
mentor, Dr. Tom Cronin. Dr. Donohue used molecular
genetics, immuno-fluorescent imaging, electrophysiology,
and behavioral techniques to discover extra-ocular
photoreceptors in stomatopod crustaceans, commonly called
mantis shrimps. Dr Donohue is currently pursuing a career in
teaching at Johns Hopkins University. (APPLAUSE)>>:Tejashree Joglekar, biological Sciences. Being hooded by her mentor,
Dr. Charles Bieberich. Dr. Joglekar used a novel
biochemical method to identify rational combinations of
cancer drugs that synergize to extend patient survival. She
will pursue post-doctoral studies at the Uniformed
Services University of the Health Sciences Center for
Prostate Disease Research to identify new treatments for
prostate cancer. (APPLAUSE)>>:Joshua Brown, biochemistry, being hooded by
his mentor, Dr. Michael Summers. Dr. Brown used
nuclear magnetic resonance and biophysical methods to
understand how structural changes in the HIV-1 RNA
genome regulate its function and help the virus reproduce.
He will return to medical school at the University of
Maryland, Baltimore to complete his M.D.-Ph.D.
studies, after which he plans to pursue a career as a
physician scientist. (APPLAUSE)>>:Janae Baptiste, biochemistry, being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Michael Summers. Dr. Baptiste
used nuclear magnetic resonance methods to determine
how the feline immunodeficiency virus
assembles in affected cells and how it can be used as a
model to develop new HIV therapies. She’s currently
extending these studies as a post-doctoral fellow with Dr.
Summers and will be teaching biochemistry at UMBC this
fall. (APPLAUSE)>>:Joshua Hudson, applied mathematics, whose mentor is
Dr. Animikh Biswas, and being hooded by Dr. Rouben
Rostamian. Dr. Hudson established regularity
properties and decay rates for the flows of conductive fluids
when coupled with a magnetic field and demonstrated the
effectiveness of some data assimilation algorithms in
approximating such flows. He will join the Johns Hopkins
University Applied Physics Lab this fall. (APPLAUSE)>>:Chen-Kai Lai, applied mathematics, whose mentor is Dr. Florian Portra,
being hooded by Dr. Rouben Rostamian. Dr. Lai used
parallel computation and domain decompensation schemes
to develop efficient algorithms for solving 2D
acoustic wave and Helmholtz equations for seismic
inversion and defense air platform aural detection. Dr.
Lai is currently serving as a senior operational research
analyst and team leader at the US Army Materials Systems
Analysis Activity. (APPLAUSE)>>:Iris Ivy Gauran, statistics, being
hooded by her mentors, Dr. Junyong Park and Dr. Dohwan
Park. Dr. Gauran proposed multiple testing procedures
controlling false discovery rate and applied them to
protein domain data. She will join the University of the
Philippines in August as a faculty member in the school
of statistics. (APPLAUSE)>>:John Zylstra, statistics, being hooded, by
his mentor, Dr. Bimal Sinha. Dr. Zylstra’s doctoral
dissertation provides elegant statistical methods for data
collecting agencies to publish sensitive data while
preserving the privacy of the subjects and the
confidentiality of their responses. His methods are
likely to be used at the U.S. Census Bureau. John plans to
pursue a research career in the federal government. (APPLAUSE)>>:Amanda Dotson, physics, being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Markos
Georganopoulos. Using observations from Fermi,
NASA’s gamma ray orbiting observatory, Dr. Dotson
developed an applied method to find the distance from the
black hole of quasars, where powerful gamma ray emission is
produced. She is currently teaching physics at Morgan
State University. (APPLAUSE)>>:Karthik Boppidi, chemical and
biochemical engineering, being hooded by his mentor, Dr. Mark
Marten. Dr. Boppidi used a systems biology approach to
better understand protein expression and secretion in
filamentous fungi. Dr. Boppidi is currently employed at Shire
Pharmaceuticals as a senior upstream development engineer. (APPLAUSE)>>:Marwah El-Sayed, chimical and biochemical, engineering,
being hooded by her mentor, Dr. Christopher Hennigan.
Interested in air pollution, Dr. El-Sayed developed new
analytical methods to characterize the sources and
formation of an important chemical component of
particulate matter. She is currently extending these
field studies as a post-doctoral fellow in the
Atmospheric Science Department at Colorado State University. (APPLAUSE)>>:Ke He, chemical and biochemical engineering, being
hooded by his mentor, Dr. Lee Blaney. Dr. He developed and
employed novel methods to measure contaminants of
emerging concern, such as pharmaceuticals and personal
care products, in wastewater treatment plants and
Chesapeake Bay water, sediment, and oysters. He is
currently a post-doctoral research fellow at the
University of Maryland, Baltimore. (APPLAUSE)>>:Mehregan Jalalizadeh, environmental engineering, being hooded by
her mentor, Dr. Upal Ghosh. Dr. Jalalizadeh developed a
novel passive sampling approach for the measurement
of ultra-low concentrations of toxic compounds in the aquatic
environment and advanced the understanding of diffusive
processes that govern pollutant uptake and samplers.
She is currently a senior staff engineer at Geosyntec
Consultants. (APPLAUSE)>>:Abhay Kashyap, computer science, being hooded
by his mentor, Dr. Tim Finin. Dr. Kashyap developed a system
to improve music recommendation by enabling
machines to understand the meaning conveyed in a song’s
lyrics and the artistic style of composition using deep
neural network machine learning techniques. He is
currently a Data Scientist at Walmart Labs, where he is
developing smarter product recommendation systems. (APPLAUSE)>>:Edward Raff, computer science, being hooded by his mentor, Dr.
Charles Nicholas. Dr. Raff developed new methods to
detect malware by measuring the similarity between files.
Using inspiration from compression algorithms, this
new similarity measure can be used for any file type and
works on multiple operating systems, including Windows and
Linux. Dr. Raff is continuing to develop these methods as a
senior lead scientist at Booz Allen Hamilton. (APPLAUSE)>>:Aaron DeLong, electrical engineering, being hooded by his mentor, Dr. Gary
Carter. Dr. DeLong combined his knowledge of nonlinear
optics, communications theory, and signal processing to
experimentally investigate an optical repolarization
technique for long-distance optical fiber communications
systems. He is currently extending these skills as a
senior professional staff member at the Johns Hopkins
University Applied Physics Laboratory. (APPLAUSE)>>:Mohamed Arif Ul Alam, information systems, being hooded by his mentor,
Nirmalya Roy DR. Alam developed an autonomous
cognitive health assessment tool that combines novel,
wearable, and ambient sensor technology, ambient sensor
signal processing techniques, and machine learning schemes.
He is currently working as a research staff member at
MIT-IBM Watson Artificial Intelligence Lab located in
Cambridge, Mass. continuing cognitive health research. (APPLAUSE)>>:Peng Chu, information systems, being hooded by his mentor,
Dr. Anita Komlodi. Dr. Chu used quantitative and
qualitative methods to study user behavior in online search
engine interaction in multilingual information
retrieval. He is currently working as a software quality
engineer at Honeywell Intelligrated. (APPLAUSE)>>:Anupama Dash, information systems, being hooded by Dr. Zhiyuan Chen.
Dr. Dash developed a way of personalizing online product
reviews using advanced text analytics and statistical
modeling to enable consumers to view pertinent product
reviews based on their preferences. She is working as
a research scientist at Intelligent Automation
Incorporated and contributing to several projects focused on
social media and geopolitical data analytics. (APPLAUSE)>>:Cailing Dong, information systems, being hooded by her mentor, Dr.
Zhiyuan Chen. Dr. Dong applied differential privacy methods
on social recommendations that link both online and offline
social worlds to provide users with accurate recommendations
while protecting users’ privacy on online social
networks. Dr. Dong is currently working as a data
scientist at Intelligent Fusion Technology. (APPLAUSE)>>:Evan M. Bates, mechanical engineering, being hooded by his mentor Dr.
Carlos A. Romero Talamas. Dr. Bates worked on the design,
simulation, and successful construction of high-power
bitter-type electromagnets to study magnetized dusty
plasmas. Dr. Bates currently works on chemical, biological,
radiological, and nuclear defense at the Naval Surface
Warfare Center Dahlgren Division. (APPLAUSE)>>:Daming Chen, mechanical engineering, being hooded by his mentor, Dr.
Weidong Zhu. Dr. Chen developed a novel
three-dimensional continuously scanning laser vibrometry
technique and applied it to detect structural damage
before catastrophic failures could occur. He is currently a
post-doctoral researcher at UMBC. (APPLAUSE)>>:Will the candidates for the degree of Master of Fine Arts please rise?>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:The Master of Fine Arts is
the terminal degree in this field. Dr. Hrabowski.>>:Dr. Rutledge.>>:Dr. Hrabowski, I have the
honor of presenting the candidates recommended by the
faculty of the University of Maryland Graduate School,
Baltimore for the degree of Master of Fine Arts.>>:Upon the recommendation of
the faculty and by the authority of the state of
Maryland given to the Board of Regents and the chancellor of
the University System of Maryland and, by them,
entrusted to me, I hereby admit you to the degree of
Master of Fine Arts which you have earned during the course
of your studies at the University of Maryland
graduate school Baltimore in token whereof you shall be
given a diploma with all of the honors privileges and
responsibilities thereunto pertaining.>>:Will the candidates to the
degree of Master of Fine Arts now please proceed, with their
mentors, to the platform to receive their diplomas. (APPLAUSE)>>:Parastoo Aslanbeik, intermedia and digital arts, being hooded
by her mentor, Professor Mark Alice Durant. In response to
attempts to ban Iranians and other Muslims from entering
the United States, Ms. Aslanbeik created a monumental
installation that integrated an ancient Persian symbol and
photography techniques with sculpture and sound. She plans
to continue her activism artwork to bring attention to
immigration, Islamophobia, race and gender issues. (APPLAUSE)>>:Mollye Bendell, intermedia and digital arts, being hooded by
her mentor, Professor Timothy Nohe. Ms. Bendell’s
“Wander/Wonder” explored the nature of speculation and our
changing relationships with physicality through two
separate but connected experiences – “Wander,” a
walkable virtual street map of Baltimore city with all
buildings removed except for the storefronts of psychic
readers, and “Wonder,” a zero gravity astral plane
experienced as a virtual reality environment.>>(APPLAUSE)>>:Christopher Kojzar, intermedia and digital arts, being hooded
by his mentor, Professor Lee Boot. Dr. Kojzar creates art
in response to his interactions with people in
public spaces. He was awarded the RTKL fellowship in the
intermedia and digital arts program to display his thesis
exhibition and named an Imagining America JGS fellow
in recognition of his service to the local community through
media arts. He will be working, this summer, as a
documentarian and will continue his arts practice and
residencies around the country. (APPLAUSE)>>:MJ Neuberger, intermedia and digital arts, being hooded by her mentor,
Professor Lynn Cazabon. Tracing the history of trauma
in her family to the forces of colonialism, Ms. Neuberger
makes artwork that engages in ritual attempts to return a
body abandoned in abuse and acknowledges grief as a path
toward healing. She looks forward to exhibiting her work
and to teaching. (APPLAUSE)>>:Pinar Idil Yakut, intermedia and digital
arts, being hooded by her mentor, Professor Kathy
O’Dell. Ms. Yakut’s research explores language’s capacity
in sound, text, and image. Her videos challenge clarity of
speech, showing language’s fundamental state of flux. Her
poetic texts test the power of translation, exposing its
limits while inviting embodied interaction. She continues her
art making while pursuing a path in museum studies. (APPLAUSE)>>:Will the candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of
Public Policy, Master of Science, and Master of
Professional Studies please rise?>>:[(APPLAUSE)]>>:Dr. Hrabowski.>>:Dr. Rutledge.>>:Dr. Hrabowski, I now have
the honor of presenting the candidates recommended by the
faculty of the University of Maryland Graduate School,
Baltimore for the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of
Public Policy, Master of Science, and Masters of
Professional Studies.>>:Upon the recommendation of
the faculty and by the authority of the state of
Maryland given to the Board of Regents and the chancellor of
the University System of Maryland and, by them,
entrusted to me, I hereby admit you to the degree which
you have earned during the course of your studies at the
University of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore in
token whereof you shall be given a diploma with all of
the honors, privileges, and responsibilities thereunto
pertaining.>>:Thank you, and please be
seated. Will the candidates for the master’s degree now
proceed to the platform to receive their diplomas. Please
remain seated until your row has been escorted to the
stage. Dr. Jeffrey Halverson, associate dean of the Graduate
School, will read the names of the master of arts, master
public policy, Master of science and master of
professional studies degree candidates.>>:Thank you, Dr. Rutledge, and,
for the 11th time, good morning. And the college of arts, humanities and social sciences candidates for the
degree of Master of Arts in the Department of Economics in
the program of economic policy analysis: Lucas A. Manes. In the Department of Education and in the program of
education M.A.E, Marcia Lynn Jones. In the program of instructional systems development Anikola Hassan. In
the program of Teaching English for Speakers of Other
Languages, Amy Lynn Bermeister, Juan-Carlos
Villao, Roza Pereska- Smith, Allison Lenetsky, Kursten
Pickup, Mengdi Zeng, Alena Yazykova, Adrianna
Neuenschwander, Christopher W. Upchurch, Christina P.
Bounxouaysana, Joy Chantel Newman, Judy Davison Wolf. In the program of teaching, Leah R. Davidson Wolf, Rebecca Hopper Weisberg, Seulki Silvia Kang, Erin Marie Williams,
Hayley Taylor Banda, Megan Estee Johnson, Scott Sharp
Richmond, Benjamin Goldberg, Micah Ian Harrison, Morgan
Elena Dice, Sheila Charlise McFarland-Holt, Jessica Taylor
Michaels. In the Department of History and the program of
Historical Studies: Sudaba Lezgiyeva, Jason Bruno
Aglietti, Susan M. Philippot. In the Department of Modern
Languages Linguistics and Intercultural Communication
and in the program of Intercultural Communication:
Marvin Gerardo Barahona. In the Department of Psychology
and the program of Human Services Psychology: Surbhi
Lipkin-Moore, Ana Isabel Maldonado. In the Department
of Sociology, Anthropology and Health Administration of
Policy and in the program of Applied Sociology: Trevor
Warren Rose, Kelly Holt, Hope Jennifer Arbesman, Deveraux
Christian Smith, Sydney Phillips. Rachel Crane. Ciara
Renee Christian. Amy Marie Durning. Master of Public Policy in the school of Public Policy and in the program of
Public Policy: Erica L. Peery, Joseph Shannon Bevels,
Alexander Hirsh Ullman. In the Department of Psychology and
the program of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.
Thelma Louise McQuarley, Jennifer Lynne Carol, Marziyeh
Farshchian, Alexander – Alexandra Blyukher, Amanda
Fiery, William C. Greenwood. Moe P. Khine, Erika Leonore
Llanos, Courtney Melissa Federoff. Kayon T. Mcintyre.
Daphne Michelle Ortiz-Arias. College of Arts Humanities and
Social Sciences candidates for the degree of Master of
Science in the department of Emergency Health Services and
in the program of Emergency Health Services: Ian Hamilton,
Noor Abdel Rahman. In the Department of Geography and
Environmental Systems in the program of Geography and
Environmental Systems my student: Samantha Elizabeth
Durbin, Rikke Dystrup Jepsen. In the College of Natural and
Mathematical Sciences, candidates for the degree of
Master of Science. In the Department of Biological
Sciences and in the program of Biological Sciences, David
Brandon Kell. In the program of Applied Molecular Biology,
Alina Buechler, Frederick Joseph Flanagan, Jr., Shonda
Marie Campbell, Wendy Elizabeth Greenawalt, Jackson
Narrett, Ganesh Ramaprasad, Charles Wilfred Thomas. In the
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the
program of Chemistry, Joel McAdams. In the Department of
Mathematics and Statistics and in the program of Applied
Mathematics, Matthew Buckingham. In the Department
of Physics in the program of Physics, Joseph – excuse me –
Josey Allen Stevens, Jon Karl Gustafson, Jr., Ralph Kenneth
L. Colmenar. In the program of Atmospheric Physics, Adhikari
Pathirannahalage Nipuni Himavanthi Adhikari.
Candidates for the degree of Master in Professional Studies
in the Department of Biological Sciences and in the
program of Biotechnology, Julian. J. Partynski, Danielle
Nicole Kobi, Rebecca Marie Hutter, Yongxing Gao, Asia
Hull, Erin Irene Zebrowski. In the College of Engineering and
Information Technology, candidates for the degree of
Master of Science in the Department of Computer Science
and Electrical Engineering and in the program of Chemical
Engineering Abhilash Puranik, Abhijeet Niranjan Vhotkar,
Chetan Sai Kumar Thalisetty, Lahir Marni, Sri Harsha
Konuru, Varun Sivasubramanian, Adwaya Kulkarni. In the
program of Computer Science, Srinivas Moorthy, Suraj
Neiman, Kshipra Avinash Kode, Siddharth Utgikar, Prutha
Datae, Kadanika Valchrista Patel, Devendra Lattu, Devisha
Singh, Pratik Digambar Bhangale, Vineet Ahirkar,
Maithilee Joshi, Nitika Khurana, Rishanth Chavali.
Candidates for the degree of Master in Professional Studies
in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems and
in the program of Geographic Information Systems, Adam
Walker Duvall, Syed Muhammad Sabeeh Taqi, Xun Hu – excuse
me – Fanqi Wu, Xiuxiu Wang, Yaw Opoku Adarkwa, Muhammad
Imran Aslam, Akinwunmi Ogunbolude, Qaisar Mehmood. In
the program of Electrical Engineering, Dan Abid, Corey
Rausch, Apeksha Lanjile, Shashank Balchandra Kamath. In
the college of Engineering Management and Information
Technology and the program of Engineering Management,
Gurpreet Singh, Mitul Vivekananda Shetty, Suhas
Gopalappa, Mayur Mahesh, Nikhil Dilip Pawar, Hoshang
Nimish Mehta, Shuruti Handalik, Stafford D.R.F
Coakley, Sadoon Rashid Alkhaldi, Bryan John Rixham,
Krishna Vipul Patel, Adepoju Adebusayo. In the program of
Systems Engineering, Audrey M. Nelson Salmon, Dennis Ouma
Ndati. In the Department of Information Systems and the
program of Human-Centered Computing, Neha Uday Kale,
Rakesh Arvapalli, Rida Sebbti, Teyjas Balera, Sergio A.
Villafane, III; Klaus Scheuerman, Meghan Xuan-Chi,
Keerthana Sridhar. In the program of Information
Systems: Kelly Ann Hughes, Linta Thomas
Ampattupadappackal, Kanika Danke, Divya Bhavani Kavaturi,
Ghiwaa Taif Abdullah, Aparna Hemchandra, Sornam Selvaraj
Ravi, Vocool Devonouri, Bhushan Sontakke, Vivek
Parganiha, Amit Ajay Dighe, Neel Patel, Smit Nitin Vasani,
Kritesh Arora. Thuy Quang Lam. Abitya Mayank Shankar. Ganesh
Pradhan, Praven Vijay Pande. Khushboo Sharma, Abhil Nilan
Gandhi, Kevin Gerard Brady, Jr., Sarah Reed Dansberger,
Amanda Ramcke, Kris Collado Singh, Sagun Saru, Michael D.
Kim, Nicole Dawson, Naya M. Wilson, Olanrewaju Olayiwola,
Jason McClure, Suraj Vasant Vartak, Sairaj Shekhar Alka
Alve, Nitin Dattatray Basevekar, Nitin Subhaschandra
Deb, Varun Ashok Singh. Rhabhat Atawale, Ghadah Hassan
Albalawi, Apuruv Basari, Yahya Mahammmed Almazni,
Devika Chandrashekhar Sharma, Rashmi Murlidhar Advani,
Ayushi Varma, Jasleenkaur Gorowada, Harika Parakala,
Poonam C. Gada, Afsha Shaikh, Neetu Mukundan Menon, Drishti
Gupta, Rency Varghese, Siddish Chavan. In the Department of
Mechanical Engineering and the program of Mechanical
Engineering: Jarod Chrystopher Horn. Mechanical Engineering
Nanda Gidish Mopuri, Ashley Simone Wayne Thomas, Abel G.
Kebekabe, Vaishali Mathur, Jagruti Shrinivas
Chinchwadkar, Shivin Saraf, Sharu Seklecha. Candidates for
the degree of Master Professional Studies in the
department of Computer Science and electrical and engineering
and in the program of Cyber Security: Christian Ndum
Tanoh, Shivani Rajiv Smita Trivedi, Vamsi Swetha
Pavuluri, Kashfia Faruque, Navneeta Rathor, Alexander
Claibon Mallett. Ebiezer Quinones, Juan Diego Ceballos,
Carlos J. Rodriguez, AJ Smoot, Joseph R. Nier, Amanda Lynn
Gosnell, Victor Russell Abrams, Joseph Spekterman,
William Hyosung Choi, Candice Renee Clemons. In the
Department of Information Systems in the program of
health Information Technology: Tria LaDawn Campbell, Dorice
Saaden Mushi, Irene Reza Mziray, Amit Sharma, Aanchal
Goyal, Mohamed A. Obeidat, Karen Joanna McGuire. Mariama
Makamona Bakayoko, Shirly Sadhu Sundaram, Aysegul
Yuksel. And in the Erickson School, candidates for the
degree of Master of Arts in the program of management of
agent services, Tabassum Jabeen.>>:We’re almost there, almost
there. At this point, I’d like to acknowledge Mr. Damian
Doyle who is senior director of enterprise infrastructure
in the Division of Information Technology here in UMBC and a
member of the alumni board. He is one of the over 73,000 UMBC
alumni worldwide. He received his Bachelor’s from here in
1999 in computer science and his Master’s in 2016. Please
join me in thanking him on behalf of all the alumni –
Damian. (APPLAUSE)>>:Finally, graduates, it’s
been my tradition to quote the words of our first UMBC
president, the late Alvin Coon, who spoke to the
graduating class in 1970 and said this. “If you bring to
the future the same personal qualities and personal
commitment that you’ve brought to this campus, good and
important things will happen to each of you and to those
around you. And the university will be very proud to have
played a part in your life.” And now let me close with
these words of my own. Be confident knowing that the
education you’ve received here gives you a solid foundation
for the rest of your lives. Know that if you persevere –
and we know you will – you will reach your goals, though,
you are certain to be challenged along the way. But
remember that your dreams and most important, your character
will determine who you will become. Your character will be
reflected most clearly in the courage you possess and in the
compassion you show for others. Be true to yourselves.
And be true in your relationships, always reaching
out to inspire and to elevate. Give me a round of applause
for the truth, the importance of the truth. (APPLAUSE)>>:Graduates, you are now
officially alumni of UMBC. You will always be connected to
this place. This is your home. Congratulations. Everybody
stand and give them a round of applause. (APPLAUSE)>>:(Laughter). You have been
an amazing – just an amazing audience. We ask that you
stand where you are. Continue to stand. And join us in the
singing of the alma mater. No one should move out of respect
for the university when the alma mater is being sung. You
can find the words on the back of the inside cover of the
commencement speech. And then after that, remain standing
until we have processed out. And enjoy your day. This is
your day, graduates. Give your families one more round of
applause. (APPLAUSE)>>:(Singing) Hail alma mater,
our UMBC. Boldly bearing your colors, the whole world to
see. Striving together in true unity, black, gold. Forever,
we’re reminded of thee. Proudly, we hail to thee, our
UMBC. Throughout the ages, our UMBC songs and memories still
echo with true clarity. Knowledge and wisdom and truth
we found here, friendships we treasure that will last
through the years. Proudly we hail to thee, our UMBC. (APPLAUSE)>>:Will everyone please remain
standing until the platform party, faculty, staff and
graduates have recessed. Families and friends are asked
to meet their graduates outside of the event center.
Again, congratulations to all. (APPLAUSE) (MUSIC)