Top 10 Colleges that are NOT in the Ivy League in the U.S.

Top 10 Colleges that are NOT in the Ivy League in the U.S.

August 13, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


(bouncy music) – Hey everybody, I’m Gus
with Crimson Education. So you’ve heard of the Ivy League, right? – Harvard, Yale. – Ivy League. – Ivy League, yeah. One of them big joints, you know. – They’re like the cool kids
in the cafeteria that are all over 150 years old so they
don’t need any new friends. But the Ivy League aren’t just
the oldest schools in the US, the Ivy’s are exceptional schools. Some would say the best in
the world but there are plenty of challengers outside the Ivy League. So today, let’s take a
look at the top 10 colleges that are not in the Ivy League in the USA. (bouncy music) Number ten we got Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Williams is famous for being
ranked as the number one liberal arts school in The United States, and being located far
away from everything else that isn’t Williamstown. Williams is the smallest
school on our list with a total student population
of about 2000 students, meaning that each grade
has about 500 people in it, which is smaller than some high schools. You get to know your
classmates pretty well especially since Williams
has a famous tutorial system where sometimes two students will take a course with one professor. It’s really easy to be in the
bottom half of that class. Number nine, we’ve got
everybody’s favorite, The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT as the cool kids call it. MIT is famous for being
an engineering powerhouse, teaching its students
not just how to think, but also how to build,
literally build things, like robots, or flying bicycles,
or flying robot bicycles. It has an acceptance
rate of just under 8%, which any MIT student could
tell you, is pretty low. Being the stereotypical
really smart person school, MIT was featured in The
Avengers 2: Age of Ultron, as Tony Stark unveiled
his memory machine-thingy, spoiler alert, MIT rocks. (crowd applauds) Number eight brings us to Duke University, located in Durham, North Carolina. Known fittingly as the Ivy of the South. Or maybe the Ivy League is
just the Dukes of the North, I don’t know. Duke is even more selective
than MIT when it comes to admissions rates, and
Duke has the benefit of not experiencing Boston winters. Duke also has some of the best
sports teams in the nation, especially when it comes to basketball. So if you’re over seven
and a half feet tall, you should try it out. Duke also has a very pretty
campus if you’re into looking at trees and stuff, that
are not covered in snow. Alright, number seven is Johns Hopkins, located in Baltimore, Maryland,
close to Washington, D.C. A lot of people have heard of
Johns Hopkins Medical School, probably because it rocks and is one of the top three in the nation. But at the undergraduate
level, Johns Hopkins is known for its intense
research opportunities, which attracts students who
want to go into STEM fields. It also also has this
cool program that lets freshmen take all of their
classes, pass or fail in the first semester,
so you can get used to college life without the
stress of grades, and can take the really hard classes
without getting crushed, or you know, take the
easy classes too I guess. Number six is Northwestern
University, located North of Chicago in Evanston, Illinois. Northwestern has some of
the best humanities programs in the country, especially
journalism and theater. Producing alums including Stephen Colbert, David Schwimmer and Zack Braff. They were actually all
roommates, I’m just kidding, that’d be crazy. (joyous screams) Number five is The University of Michigan, located in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Umich is a public research university and it is a big, big school. About 60,000 people applied
to be in the freshman class last year, and Umich has
almost 30,000 undergraduates, making it about 15 times
bigger than Williams. The University of Michigan
also has one of the largest alumni networks in the world, including Google founder, Larry Page. Number four keeps us
in the Midwest with the University of Chicago, or
UChicago as the cool kids say. UChicago is known for being super unusual, starting with its bizarre
admissions essays. Most schools will ask you
to explain why you want to study with them, but UChicago
is asking hard hitters like, where is Waldo? Find x. And write an essay somehow
inspired by super huge mustard. UChicago is very quirky and
has one of the best economics programs in the nation, coincidence? Okay we are entering the
top three with UC Berkeley. UC Berkeley is known for
being more than the number one public university in
the US, it’s also famous for its long history of
student social activism. Berkeley is right next to San
Francisco and Silicon Valley, making it a popular choice
for those interested in tech. West Coast continues to
dominate with our number two non-Ivy League school, Caltech. Caltech is like MIT with
a heavy focus on STEM, but with less snow and more palm trees. It also has a similarly
super-low admissions rate, with only 8% of applicants
being offered admission. But the lowest admissions
rate on our list goes to our number one pick outside the Ivy
League, Stanford University. Stanford is in Palo Alto, California. Has super-mild weather and
some of the highest ranked academic departments in the country. Stanford accepted only 4.8%
of the applicants in 2016, lower than Harvard and Yale,
and basically everyone else. Well, that’s our top
ten US schools that are not in the Ivy League list. If you disagree with our
selections, please feel free to make your case in the comments. And if you want to learn
more, send an email to [email protected]
and mention this video. Thanks so much for watching
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