Top 10 Cheapest States To Live In The United States in 2019

Top 10 Cheapest States To Live In The United States in 2019

October 17, 2019 19 By Stanley Isaacs


Housing is by far the largest slice of the
average American budget, representing one-third of typical household spending. Because of this, the best way to cut your
costs is to reduce how much you spend to keep a roof over your head. Here are the 10 cheapest states to live in
the United States in 2019. 1. Mississippi. Living in Mississippi puts residents at a
confluence of Southern charm, innovation and cutting edge culture. Mississippi’s temperate climate and abundance
of waterways make it a popular location for outdoor lovers. Like the other cheap states, food and personal
necessities are very cheap here. You can rent a two-bedroom apartment in Gulfport
for just $778 per month. So far, that cost advantage has done little
to attract business. 2. Arkansas. All regions of Arkansas provide residents
and tourists with top-notch outdoor recreation opportunities such as fishing, boating, hiking
and hunting. The core necessities in Arkansas are as cheap
as you can find in America. Did you know that pork sausage is remarkably
inexpensive in Arkansas? It’s just $3.76 a pound in Little Rock. Additionally, Arkansas has the honor of being
home to the cheapest housing. 3. West Virginia. Noted for its mountains, rolling hills and
many state parks, West Virginia offers a variety of outdoor recreational options that include
hiking, mountain biking, skiing, fishing, hunting and whitewater rafting. The state’s strong economy is led by aerospace,
chemical research, plastics, biometrics and medicine. A lot of money is being invested into the
state. The state offers a low cost of living. You can pay less than $600 a month to rent
a nice two bedroom house with a fenced yard in a quiet neighborhood. 4. Tennessee. Tennessee is a beautiful spot for retirees
to live out their golden years. It pairs up nicely with Mississippi and Arkansas
on the cost of food and necessities. The residents face a cost of living index
of 89.7, a grocery index of 93.5, a housing index of 77.2, and health index of 89.7. Tennessee is also one of the few states that
doesn’t tax wages, residents are able to keep more of their income, though there is a 6
percent hall tax on investment interest and dividends. 5. South Dakota. While Mount Rushmore draws thousands of tourists
to South Dakota each year, the state’s natural resources, low cost of living and thriving
economy lure new residents. Agriculture, tourism and national defense
anchor the economy in South Dakota. While food and necessities aren’t as cheap
as the first two state on the list, South Dakota has a big advantage over them: No income
tax. Wherever you choose to lay your hat in South
Dakota you can be sure you will be welcomed with open arms. 6. Alabama. The cost of living in Alabama is almost 19%
lower than the national average. Affordability is one of the benefits of living
in Alabama’s cities. Tuscaloosa, the fifth-largest city in Alabama,
is home to the University of Alabama and Stillman College. Both of which employ many people in the area. The university also brings the state a large
number of temporary residents every year. Relatively high taxes and medical care for
the South prevented the state from appearing higher on the list. 7. Kentucky. Kentucky is a beautiful place to call home,
and in some cases, extremely affordable. People can live here rather cheaply but not
skim on the amenities. The generally low cost of living in Kentucky
is a major perk for anyone considering retirement in Kentucky. However, child care will set you back a couple
of grand more than others in the top ten. Anchorage, Indian Hills, Fort Thomas are the
best places to live in Kentucky. 8. Ohio. Consistently ranked one of the best states
for business, Ohio offers residents many benefits too, including a low cost of living, excellent
schools and good recreational opportunities. Everything is affordable here, whether it’s
housing, healthcare or groceries. Ohio also has some of the cheapest medical
care available in the States. The best places to live in Ohio include Columbus,
Akron, Cincinnati and Dublin. There are lots of interesting places to explore,
different activities to try, and friendly, open-minded people. 9. South Carolina. South Carolina boasts cheap child care and
standard Southern costs for food and such. However, relatively expensive medical care
and housing prevented it from being one of the cheap places to live. But it makes sense that people would pay more
to be a short drive from the Atlantic ocean with great weather. A one-bedroom apartment in South Carolina
rents for an average of $830. The state does not tax Social Security retirement
benefits. Plus, there’s a $15,000 deduction for seniors
receiving any other type of retirement income. 10. Indiana. Indiana offers residents a great quality of
life with natural attractions and vibrant cultural destinations. Military installations as well as strong manufacturing
and agriculture sectors drive the economy in Indiana. A low cost of living is one of the biggest
draws for many people to move to Indiana. Indiana’s low cost of living is in line with
its lower incomes. Indiana’s average wage has dropped to $17
an hour, which is lower than the rest of the Midwest and the United States as a whole.