The Fab 5 Meet Quincy High School’s Gay-Straight Alliance

The Fab 5 Meet Quincy High School’s Gay-Straight Alliance

November 21, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


I’m heteroflexible or bi-curious. No one cares but my mom. So I haven’t had that conversation ’cause I don’t know
how to do that respectfully. My middle sister–
I’m the youngest– she’s bisexual. And we live in a very, like… You’re black, you’re Christian, you’re quiet, you are nothing else,
you’re straight. Girlfriend, I’ve been there. I know. But then she was like, “I’m bisexual, but I’m also black,
and I’m also a Christian. Leave me alone, I’m me!” Yes!
Yeah. I’m having a really hard time
finding who I am. I don’t know if I’m straight,
I don’t know if I’m gay. I’ve had relations with both, and it’s really hard to share that. You know, I couldn’t walk in these halls
not 10 steps without someone, and brace yourselves, I got called the F-word
every 10 steps I took. At that time the gay-straight alliance was something I didn’t think
would ever be, like, literally allowed. How long has this been here? What’s bully culture like here? How is it going? If somebody is getting bullied, we try to comfort each other ’cause, all in all, we’re a support group
for each other. Not only are we a club,
but we all love each other. We’re like family. Where did you get the courage to come out? You. -Aww!
-Oh, babe. I was having a lot of anxiety and doubt, but then I discovered you guys, but you guys don’t seem
to have much stress at all. Do you mind me asking how old are you? -I’m 15.
-Okay. That takes a lot of strength,
to come out at your age. I’m not saying it’s easier when you’re 30, but coming out in school
is definitely hard. For the longest time
I didn’t even tell my mom. Like, she didn’t know for a while. Yeah, no, this was only a recent thing
when she came out. When I came out, I did not speak
to my parents for quite a few years. We were estranged, we did not have a good relationship. Eventually my parents came around. You know, when it comes to our parents, sometimes we expect them to come to terms with you being somebody
they didn’t realize you were in seconds. My coming out story… I did this really intense, like, lyrical interpretive dance
for the sixth grade talent show. It was to a Jewel song. It was really major, but– Aw, that was my coming out album! I got so many questions
about my sexuality. I just was like,
“Yeah, you know what? I am. Super gay.” I feel like there’s something
that’s always made me uncomfortable with calling myself one label because I wasn’t really sure
how I identified. And I don’t need to figure out
what it is today even at the ripe old age of 34. In my experience, in my life, it’s been more for other people just to feel comfortable
about how they can identify me. I don’t really know. I’ve never really had a relationship
with either gender, but I don’t really care. I feel like I’ll get there
when I get there. -Good.
-And I just want to be a supporter. Just because you’re coming out
to some people now doesn’t mean you have to come out
to everybody. You come out to people
when it feels right for you. When you feel it is time. You know, it took little steps. I definitely was not just a,
“Oh, ‘wham-bam’, I’m gay!” It was: I told one person, and then there was a girl I was dating who actually came out to me as well. And we’re like, “Well this is perfect.” Cute! Alright, well, we’ll stay together. You know. -We’ll both date men.
-Exactly! Well, you could date girls,
I’ll date guys. Oh, yeah. What has the community’s impact been seeing our show come back? It will inspire people to make more shows about being,
not just gay -Go there.
-but the entire LGBTQ. Yes, girl! Go there. Yes! Yes, we need more trans representation, we need more gorgeous lesbian
representation. Yes, I love that. More stories! -Yay!
-More LGBT stuff, yes. As someone who got, like, so bullied and so tormented, you guys are light years ahead of where I thought
movement would be. We’re inspiring more people by doing this, and I feel like a lot of people at a lot of schools are gonna like this. But there’s also gonna be
the people who are gonna be like, “Man, those gays are just so bad!” But I think that we are fed
so much expectations of, like, how you’re supposed to act as a female, how you’re supposed to act as a male, how you’re supposed to carry yourself. Like, all these rules
that you’re supposed to live by. You are charting a very gorgeous,
fierce course. Yes, queen! You know what I mean? I’m living for it! Well, listen, as we leave… like, stick with me,
we’re just gonna do a little chant. So, if you could just repeat after me. I love me.
I love me. I respect me.
I respect me. And love and respect
is what it’s all about. And love and respect
is what it’s all about.