Teacher uses a variety of strategies to differentiate instruction – Example 1

Teacher uses a variety of strategies to differentiate instruction – Example 1

December 3, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


So we have been doing a lot
with solving word problems. So up here it says, “I can use a variety of strategies
to add and subtract within a hundred.” And we’ve been doing addition. So we’ve been using
many different strategies. Can somebody tell me some
strategies that we’ve been using to solve addition problems? Ava, can you give me a strategy
that we’ve been using? Make a ten? Make a ten. Very good.
Can you explain what make a ten is? You take some ones from the
number that is closest to a ten, to make another number
with a multiple of ten. Because a number with a zero
is very easy to add to. I love what Ava just said at the end. She said a number with a zero at
the end, all of our multiple of ten, are easier to add. We just saw that over there. We added those super quick
in our head, didn’t we? So if we can make a ten, that helps
the problem be much easier, right? Katy, can you give me another
strategy that we’ve been working on to solve addition problems? Regrouping. Regrouping, or using
our standard algorithm of lining up the ones
and the tens. Awesome. And can somebody tell me
our last strategy that we’ve been using
to solve addition problems? Mia, can you tell us
the last strategy? Break apart. Our break apart method. Very good. Mia, can you tell us what the is? Remind us what the
break apart method is. The break apart method is a method where
you take a number—let’s say I had 27. So there’s two 10s and seven 1s.
So you would put 20 plus 7. Great. So we would use that expanded
form that we’ve been doing so much of. We break apart our number
into tens and ones, and then we add our tens
and our ones. Nice job. So what I have here is I have our
strategies that we’ve been using up here so that you can look at these
as you solve the problems.