Susan Nolan teaching an Orton Gillingham lesson with a dyslexic child

Susan Nolan teaching an Orton Gillingham lesson with a dyslexic child

November 30, 2019 35 By Stanley Isaacs


>>INSTRUCTOR: I’m going to show you some letters and I want you to give me the sounds. >>STUDENT: YA and EY, RR, SSS, JA, VVV, WO, ZZZ, C, FFF, HHA>>INSTRUCTOR: You’re fast. >>STUDENT: KKA, U, AAA, I, OO, PPP, T, MMM, B, D, NNN, I, GG, EEE, QUU, XXX>>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent, that was really fast. Charlotte now this time I’m going to say the sound. I want you to repeat it and then write it, okay? “VVV.” I couldn’t hear anything. Good. Charlotte, if you write something that you don’t want, just put one nice neat line through it like that, okay? Say “YUH.”>>STUDENT: YUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good job. “PUH.”>>STUDENT: Puh. >>INSTRUCTOR: Good. Let’s go right across this way to this red line, and then we’ll go back to this red line, OK? “T.”>>STUDENT: T.>>INSTRUCTOR: MMM.>>STUDENT: MMM.>>INSTRUCTOR: RRR.>>STUDENT: RRR.>>INSTRUCTOR: SSS.>>STUDENT: SSS.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good. Let’s come back over here. JA.>>STUDENT: JA.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good. That does say “JA.” Do you know another way to spell “JA”?>>STUDENT: D-G-E.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good! You know of that one too. Go ahead and write that one. And you know one more way to spell “JA.” Excellent. Do you know which one of these is your first choice? That’s used the most in our language? Actually, this one. >>STUDENT: Oh.>>INSTRUCTOR: Next, say… “D.” Over here. Repeat it for me.>>STUDENT: D.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good job. NNN.>>STUDENT: NNN.>>INSTRUCTOR: WO.>>STUDENT: WO.>>INSTRUCTOR: ZZZ.>>STUDENT: ZZZ.>>INSTRUCTOR: L.>>STUDENT: L.>>INSTRUCTOR: GUH. Oh, that’s a nice capital. Can you make it lowercase? Perfect. Say, “GUH.”>>STUDENT: GUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: EHH.>>STUDENT: EHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Read back to me what you wrote.>>STUDENT: EHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: What does this say?>>STUDENT: It says, “AHH.”>>INSTRUCTOR: Good proofreading! Did I say “AHH” or “EHH”?>>STUDENT: EHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good job. One nice neat line. Perfect. Let’s write that one down here three more times and say “EHH.”>>STUDENT: EHH. EHH. EHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Emily, when you see this, I want you to think of this straight line here as the straight line here. This edge. Can you say “Edge”? >>STUDENT: Edge.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good. Now say “Edge” without the “GE.”>>STUDENT: Edge.>>INSTRUCTOR: Without the “GE.”>>STUDENT: EHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good! Good. So, when you make that edge, then you go like that. Alright? Very good. KKA.>>STUDENT: KKA.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good. You know another way to spell “KKA.” Good! Do you know where you use this spelling?>>STUDENT: Uh…. In a short word, after a short vowel, you spell “CK.”>>INSTRUCTOR: That’s right. After a short vowel, one short vowel, you use this one. So you know one more way to spell “KKA.” Good. And do you know which one of those is used the most in spelling for our language? Yes, that one’s used the most. Say “FFF.”>>STUDENT: FFF.>>INSTRUCTOR: HHH.>>STUDENT: HUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: No voice. Just “HHH.”>>STUDENT: HHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Good job. QUH.>>STUDENT: QUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: What always goes with that letter? Good job. KSS.>>STUDENT: KSS.>>INSTRUCTOR: UHH.>>STUDENT: UHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: AAH.>>STUDENT: AAH.>>INSTRUCTOR: IHH.>>STUDENT: IHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: AHH. >>STUDENT: AHH.>>INSTRUCTOR: BUH.>>STUDENT: BUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Read back what you wrote.>>STUDENT: BUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Ah. Let’s…>>STUDENT: I mean, “DUH.”>>INSTRUCTOR: Very good. Take your hands and go like this. Good. Notice the shape of this letter? What letter is this?>>STUDENT: It’s a D. I mean-B! >>INSTRUCTOR: Good. When you say the alphabet, you go, “A, B, C, D.” OK? So this one is in the shape of what?>>STUDENT: A “B.”>>INSTRUCTOR: And this one is in the shape of a…>>STUDENT: D.>>INSTRUCTOR: Now show me which hand matches that one. Good job. So let’s put one nice neat line through that. Good. Write “BUH” three times and say it.>>STUDENT: BUH. BUH. BUH.>>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent. Very good. Alright. So now we’re going to read some make believe words. Go ahead. >>STUDENT: Yap? Yep.>>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent.>>STUDENT: Rep. Sep.>>INSTRUCTOR: Like in “September”.>>STUDENT: Tep. I mean, Sep. Set!>>INSTRUCTOR: Good job.>>STUDENT: Jat? Jet.>>INSTRUCTOR: Very good.>>STUDENT: Vet.>>INSTRUCTOR: Is that a real word? Can you use it in a sentence?>>STUDENT: I took my dog to the vet.>>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent sentence.>>STUDENT: M…. Vem. Wem. Wum. Lum. Cum. Fum. Fam. Fad. Han. Kan.>>INSTRUCTOR: Would that be your first choice for spelling “CAN”? Which one is used the most?>>STUDENT: C.>>INSTRUCTOR: Alright. Excellent. How about that one?>>STUDENT: Z… Zan. Zag. Zig. Z… Za… Zix. Kix. Kib.>>INSTRUCTOR: And what would this say if I did that? >>STUDENT: Kibe. >>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent. >>STUDENT: Quid… Quid… Quib. Quibe. Quob. Quobe. >>INSTRUCTOR: Nice job. Perfect. Alright. So today we are going to play a bit of a game and we are going to review our syllable types. So the three that we are going to work on are “closed,” this stands for “closed.” This stands for “open.” This stands for “silent E.” Okay, if you look at this little card, you notice how the door is closed. When the door is closed what does that say? >>STUDENT: Dis.. AH. >>INSTRUCTOR: But if I open the door up and the vowel is on the end what does it say? >>STUDENT: O so that’s NO. >>INSTRUCTOR: And if I put a silent E here at the end what does it say? >>STUDENT: It’s Not… Note.>>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent if you put this E out here it’s going to give all the power back to this letter and it’s going to say it’s name so “note.” So let’s see if you can decide, and we’ll just play this for a short time. You draw a card and you tell me what the card says, and you tell me if it’s “closed,” “open,” or “silent E.” >>STUDENT: This is a closed syllable. >>INSTRUCTOR: Good, so you put yours there. Mine is “which” and I have a closed syllable. Your turn. The first one of us to get one in each space wins. >>STUDENT: Shine, that’s an open syllable? >>INSTRUCTOR: Show me the pattern here. If yours looks like this? Or like that? Or like that? Please show me on here what you think. >>STUDENT: It looks like this.>>INSTRUCTOR: Oh so what kind of syllable is that? How many vowels are in a closed syllable? >>STUDENT: 3? I mean 4. >>INSTRUCTOR: Well the vowels are just A E I O and U. Okay, so this only has one vowel right? And mine only has one vowel so in a closed syllable you only have one vowel. Do you have both an I and an E? Then it can’t be closed. >>STUDENT: It has to be open.>>INSTRUCTOR: Well if it’s open, an open has only how many vowels? >>STUDENT: It has to be a silent E. >>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent, good job. Oh goodness, I have two, I have E inside. Since you have a silent E I think I’m going to go with a silent E. Your turn. >>STUDENT: Sat.. Sut..Bent.>>INSTRUCTOR: Let’s take a look at that again, you have this syllable. Does this syllable – how many vowels are in this syllable? >>STUDENT: 1. >>INSTRUCTOR: 1. Okay, now where is that 1 vowel? >>STUDENT: At the end. >>INSTRUCTOR: So what kind of syllable is this? >>STUDENT: An open syllable. >>INSTRUCTOR: And you win. Very good, nice job. So tell me what you remember about a closed syllable. >>STUDENT: It — it only has – it has a consonant that both consonants are trapping it. >>INSTRUCTOR: So that it has one consonant closing in the vowel right? Tell me what you remember about an open syllable. >>STUDENT: The open syllable doesn’t have any – consonant right here. >>INSTRUCTOR: Excellent and what do you remember about silent E? >>STUDENT: It makes the A say its name.>>INSTRUCTOR: It makes that first vowel say its name. Very good, thank you very much.