Summer Opportunities at U.S. Universities and Colleges

Summer Opportunities at U.S. Universities and Colleges

August 27, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


00:00:00.000,00:00:08.946 JENIKA HEIM: Hello, my
name is Jenika Heim, and I’m the EducationUSA
adviser to Canada. EducationUSA is funded by
the US Department of State. And we provide free
advising resources to you. We’re a great resource,
and one of the many things that we do besides free
advising, great website, blogs, all those wonderful
things, we also do a monthly webinar series. So the series focus for
today is summer abroad opportunities at US
colleges and universities. And we have an
excellent expert here to talk to us about this topic. So Jessica Madrigal is here
from Johns Hopkins University, located in Baltimore. She’s the director of summer
and intercessional programs. She’s also highly involved with
a consortium of summer programs and she’s going to tell
you more about that. And so without further ado, I’m
going to go ahead and turn it over to Jessica. JESSICA MADRIGAL: Great. Thanks, Jenika. So it’s my pleasure to welcome
you to our summer opportunities webinar. And I have been
in summer programs both as a student
then as a lecturer and now as a director
of summer programs and have been in summer programs
for just about 30 years. And as Jenika said, I’m here
representing our consortium. Our consortium is called the
North American Association of Summer Sessions. And it does include a few
of the Canadian schools. And we are getting geared up
to have our annual meeting in a few weeks. And it will be in
Montreal, Canada. So we reached out
to EducationUSA prior to our attendance
at this conference. And as part of promoting
summer programs, we’re going to
have this webinar. In addition, we’ll be
having a college-type fair. And we have about
20 institutions participating in the fair. So I’ll talk a little bit
more about that later. So hello to Elizabeth
in Guadalajara. I spent two weeks in Guadalajara
at the end of the summer and I loved it. So you’re in a beautiful place. So the North American
Association of Summer Sessions, or what we call
NAASS, is comprised of about 230 universities
from across the United States. And so we have representative
higher ed institutions. Some of them are
two year colleges. Some are four year
colleges or universities. And they’re all over
the United States. And basically, what we do
is we share best practice. We share research. We share enrollment
information and trends. We are advocates for summer
immersion, for intensive study. And a lot of us, myself
included, also do short term programs in the winter. And the winter term for
us would be January. And as you can see, we
have full representation from all 50 states, and
from Hawaii and Puerto Rico and Canada and Mexico. NAASS.org is the website
for this association. And the website has
a search function, so you are able to choose. Let’s say you wanted to
go to school in Illinois. You would be able to choose
on the search function and it has a drop
down menu where you could search for
schools in Illinois and get any schools that would
have summer programs there. We’ll also provide you with
a direct link to the website, so you wouldn’t have to do
searching through Google. You could go through
the NAASS.org website. So summer programs are the
term between May and August at most universities. So when the spring semester
ends is when we’re usually starting our summer term. And some schools have programs
that range from two weeks to all the way up to 12 weeks. And they’re different than
the traditional semester. So in the fall
semester in the US, it’s usually from August,
from late August to December and then the spring semester
would start in January and May. And those courses are
normally 14 to 15 weeks long. And undergraduate
students and grad students would take four classes
or five courses. So you are usually in class
one day a week for an hour and throughout 14 or 15
weeks in the semester, and that’s how you obtain
your three credit hour course. For courses that are four
credit hours or more, you’re spending more
time in the classroom. So what we try to
do in summer is to consolidate and teach the
same courses over a shorter period of time. So they are intensive. You still have the
same seat time, so you would have 40
instructional hours in the fall or spring. You would still have
40 instructional hours in the summer. But because classes are meeting
every day or three days a week for two hours, slightly
longer period of time, there is more opportunity for
varying instructional format. So instructors that
teach in summer are usually modifying the way
they would teach the course during the academic
year by including more interactive
sessions, perhaps including a little
bit more group work. Certainly you would have a break
in between instructional hours. And that would be helpful. So again, it’s the same contact
hours and the same instruction time and a rapid
pace intensive study. And for some students,
that works out better. Now, sometimes that also means
that they’re smaller class size, because
students– we wouldn’t have all of the university
students participating. We would have
students that would need to take the class
at that particular time. And the smaller
class size also leads to greater discussion, greater
interaction with the faculty. So summer programs are
using the immersive theory– classes that meet several
times a week for longer hours. Usually you’re immersed
in one topic or subject, experiential courses and
engaging teaching practices. What we mean by that
is that very often, we would take a subject matter
such as abnormal psychology and you would meet
practitioners. So if you’re talking
about criminality, you would have the opportunity
to visit courthouses. You would have the opportunity
to visit with maybe a clinic, talk to a psychiatrist about
it, talk to law enforcement. So we would try to use
as much as possible the out of class activities
and co-curricular activities and trips. Now usually, this is
according to the strengths of the institution, the location
where your institution is. In our area, Johns
Hopkins is in Baltimore, and Baltimore is a port city. It was one of the original
cities that helped establish the United States. So we have courses
in history that would involve the
Revolutionary War, the writing of the– history courses
at either our fort, Fort McHenry, or
perhaps for Civil War we would travel to
the Civil War sites. So things like that make the
course more experiential. The teachers would be
outside the classroom engaging with students,
and the students would become more
active participants. So participatory learning,
a lot of discussion, a lot of interacting with
the faculty and students is part of the summer
teaching experience. Usually, the students
want to be there. Now, I’m not talking
about students that perhaps– for those
of us that are older, we remember having to
go to summer school as something negative. But very often, the
students enrolled in summer are there for a purpose. It’s either because they need
to get a prerequisite taken care of or if they want to perhaps
take a summer course so that they can have more time
in the fall or the spring to study abroad or to
take on an internship. So usually, we’re not
in the remedial setting at most of the summer programs. But we’re more in
the how to advance the education of the students. And we do have a
high success rate. So the studies that
have looked at grades in summer course versus
a fall or spring class have found that really, the
students perform just as well. And sometimes, summer
intensive study is even better for students
because they’re just focused on one subject or two subjects. And therefore, that
immersive experience allows them to really the
dig deep into their subject and perform well. So really, the rigorous
courses are still tackled, but you are more focused. So just like when
you study language, if you are in an
immersive setting and you’re studying
language every day, that’s the same kind
of analogy that you could use toward other
subjects, like calculus. Or history– if you don’t like
memorizing dates or learning about history, it’s a good
time to take that history class because you know that
you’ll be in intensive study for five, six,
seven weeks and then you will be just
immersed in the lectures. I know when I needed to take
a history class in college, that’s the one I signed up for. I took a Russian history
course over the summertime. And it was a pretty good class. So in summer programs,
we definitely will vary in what we teach,
depending on the institution. So some of us are teaching only
undergraduate courses or only grad courses. Others of us do non-credit. Some schools will have
intensive English programs. Some will have courses that we
call summer institutes, which are very contained
classes, sometimes are one or two courses, and they
might give you a certificate or you may leave the program
with just general knowledge. It could be something about
information, computer science. It would depend on the
institution, again. And then the
pre-college programs are always popular for
students from within the US and international
students who want to get the experience of what
it’s like to live on a college campus, what it’s
like to take classes at the undergraduate level. And so it gives them another
opportunity to explore. And we’ll talk about
all of these in depth. Now, normally the
majority of the students enrolled in summer
programs are students at our own institutions. So at John Hopkins, we have
about 30% of our undergraduates are taking summer classes. At other schools,
like University of Colorado at
Boulder, their classes are comprised of about
90% Colorado students. And most of us do open our
doors to visiting students. So these would be students
that are perhaps in an area or would want to study at
one of our institutions and test it out, or if we find
something such as– at Hopkins, it would be maybe a
public health course that you wouldn’t otherwise
find at your home school, or perhaps with a
different focus. You might come and take
our summer classes. So that is the reason
for this slide. We have courses for credit, the
non-credit classes, and then intensive English programs,
summer institutes, and pre-college programs. So we will start with the
intensive English programs, especially since we have our
EducationUSA adviser, Elizabeth from Guadalajara. And maybe some of you
in Francophone Canada may wish to take intensive
English programs. So beyond what you would
learn in your high school or university for skills of
reading, writing, listening, and speaking, there
are programs in the US that would specialize on helping
you with your technical writing or how to do
research writing, how to write a thesis in English. For those of you that
maybe are thinking about taking an undergrad degree
or a graduate degree in the US, some of us are teaching TOEFL
preparation or SAT prep. Georgetown University offers
a course called College Prep. And they do look– it’s
a pre-college program for high school students. They do the SAT prep. They do college writing
help as well as math skills. So these are programs meant
to help students in general, whether they’re US-based or
international students get into college through these
test preparations or program preparations. Sometimes you
might find a course in professional
communication, classes for students that are graduating
from schools overseas, where English is not the
native language that learn how to do an interview
in English, how to write a resume
in English– so some very specialized courses. Or you might have a
course that is really meant to improve conversation. And so those classes are usually
on American culture or cinema, just courses that
are meant to get some dialogue, some engagement. And I see that my colleague
from the Student’s Institute of Technology in
New Jersey is here. So we will tag team and
she can answer questions as I give the presentation. So thanks so much for joining. So again, these intensive
English programs are short. Some of them could
be from one week to 12 weeks– very intensive. Usually to obtain
a student visa, you need a minimum of 18 hours
in the classroom per week. And so most of the courses
or programs on average will have you in 20 hours
of classroom instruction. And the good thing
about this is that you might be used to learning
English with French speakers only in the classroom
or with Spanish speakers only in the classroom. And it’s very common to switch
into your first language. But when you are
studying in the US, you’ll have speakers of many
languages, all learning English together. And your language of
communication will be English. So you will share
that common language. And there’s nothing
like learning a language in the country
where it’s spoken. So you’ll have the
full immersion. And of course, the cultural
experience of living in the US, of being on a college
campus, attending classes on college campuses,
meeting American students, and living with them
in the dormitories is also something that our
intensive English program students look forward to. Now, the non-credit
classes– these are courses that still
have the academic focus, but you’re not necessarily
receiving a university transcript. Some schools will
be able to offer you a non-credit transcript
with the name of the course when you took the class. But there is no grade involved. So these are non-credit. Sometimes these are
certificate programs. You might think of certificate
programs as having to do with maybe a Python class or a C++ but
we offer certificate programs in everything from sports
management to human resources to maybe a nutrition class. There are many different
types of non-credit courses and offerings that
you would see. Some schools do
not refer to them as non-credit courses
but as summer institutes. And I know that at least at
the University of Pennsylvania, they have some institutes that
are for high school students. And so they have
some programs that are for students that
are interested in biomedical engineering fields. And so they would spend
four weeks on their campus in a research lab doing work. And that’s their
summer institute. Now, it does give us
a good opportunity to teach in alternative
delivery methods. So sometimes, you
don’t have to be in the classroom
for the entire time. Some courses might
be hybrid, where you spend some time
in the classroom and then some time
online, or the course may be entirely online. So summer programs are not
restricted to travel to the US, although we certainly would
love to have students on campus. But we are pretty adept
at most institutions in delivering courses online. A lot of the summer programs
are part of continuing education units, master’s programs,
and have online delivery. And we’re able to teach
the courses online as well. So there are alternative
delivery methods. Some of them may be
considered workshops, where you’re doing a
lot of interaction, or if we have a
summer conference on a particular topic to
bring students to campus, you would be able to
participate in those. And for the most part,
the experiential programs would involve some
type of field study. It could be an archaeology
course where you go do a dig. Or it might be a
project lab where you’re working on
protein engineering and doing that type of lab work. It may be a course on
sports negotiation, where you would get to visit
our Oriole Stadium and talk to folks
there that are involved with the players and
the union, et cetera. So there are all
sorts of programs that might be able to find. And summertime is
usually a good time for institutions to test out
new courses and programs. And again, the non-credit
program, summer institutes, they will all vary in length,
according to the institution, but they’ll take place sometime
between May and August. Some institutions will have
what they call a May-mester or a pre-session, which is a
very intensive May of courses, and usually you can take one
class in a three or four week period. Or they may have an Aug-mester. I know University of Colorado is
now teaching classes in August over four weeks. So again, the length will vary. But I was saying that
new courses and topics at the curriculum and the
innovation is there in summer. It’s sometimes a period when
professors or departments are testing out courses. So they might use, for
instance, a community project. For instance, a
community health program might teach a class
on food access and look at junk foods
versus whole foods, and what’s happening
in this community? Where is the community
accessing their groceries? Are there any
supermarkets or are they counting on the grocery
stores down the street only? Is it more expensive for them? What kind of nutrition
do the students have? So all these topics, I think,
would lead to a good summer course, because there would
be some classroom activities, some lectures, and then some
experiential programming, perhaps some service learning. If you’re able to go to a
food bank and volunteer there. Some of our programs
are also doing what we call Study in the USA. So it might be a Hopkins-based
course with our faculty, but the class is taught
elsewhere in the United States. So these, while
rare, are out there. I know GW is based
in Washington DC, but they have courses on Native
Americans in the Midwest. So you’d have to take a look at
the location, the institution, and do some research through
the NAASS.org website. The visa question
on, do Canadians require a visa for
college programs? I think, James,
that sometimes it will depend on the institution. The best thing is for
me to bring you back to the EducationUSA. And I see that Jenika
is already there. Some institutions do require
that students attending our programs have an F1
visa, that have the student visa, while others, if
it’s a non-credit course that does not meet for the
20 hours of required time, for instance, would not require
that you come in on a student visa. They might allow you
to do the tourist visa. But we always refer
the visa questions back so that you can
get the best answer from your country of origin. Sometimes it might vary. So I hope that I answered that. If not, Jenika can step
in and fill in the blanks. There. Now, for pre-college
programs, since we’re on the topic, perfect
timing, James. Well, students would select
a program at an institution based on whatever their academic
needs and interests are. So if you are
interested in studying at a school in New
York, you would be able to go to Syracuse
University or Columbia University. They have great
pre-college programs. And usually, the strengths
of those institutions are also the strengths of
their pre-college programs. So you might go to
Syracuse University for a program on architecture. Or you might go for a program
in the arts and theater. At Columbia, you would go
for another type of program. So you would look at
the type of university. Sometimes universities that
are two year colleges– sometimes two year colleges
or community colleges would offer pre-college
programs, and then colleges and
universities as well. So you look at the university’s
strengths, the location, what are the fields
of study, what do I want to study
when I go to undergrad? Am I looking for a
student body that’s mostly in an urban setting,
traditional students in dormitories? Am I looking for a big state
school or a smaller liberal arts college? So you would start
asking the same questions that you would ask
if you were applying to university in the US. And I know that EducationUSA
does a lot of outreach and provides a lot
of help to students in determining what institution
is the right fit for them. And so when you’re selecting
a pre-college program, you should also
look at that fit. This is going to be
a good fit for me? Am I going to feel comfortable? Sometimes the faculty that
are teaching the programs are regular faculty. Now, I know at John Hopkins
we have several full faculty, full professors that teach in
our pre-college programs that love having high school
students in their classes. Usually, the
pre-college students are used to being in class
for long periods of time, from 7:00 in the morning
or 7:30 or 8:00 when they start their day until 3:00 PM. That’s something that
undergrads fall out of habit. And so for an intensive
program in the summertime where students are in class for
two, and two and a half hours, for a high school student,
they’re used to that. And it’s not a problem. They participate. They’re active learners
in the classroom. They want to do well. And so usually our faculty love
having the high school students there. And in addition, what
you should look at is, if I go to this
university and I think I am well-prepared to
take these classes, but what if I get
there and suddenly I realize I need some help? What kind of support services
do they have for you? Things from student
health, if you get a virus or if you’re ill, am
I going to have access to student health services? Am I going to have access
to tutoring services? If I get homesick, is there
a counselor I can talk to? And things like the
library, the computer labs– you want to make sure that
when you are selecting a summer program, that you are there
as an active participant, that you will be
treated as if you were an undergraduate
student or regularly attended the university. So things like
student activities– do they have a film series? Are they going to
have activities for me to do after I
finish with classes? What about the weekends? Will we go on field trips? So all of those things,
I think, are important. And you will see
in the next slide, the admissions
requirements vary. And certainly, like the length
of the program, whether it’s credit or non-credit,
the institution where it is being offered,
all of these things will affect the
cost of a program. And we have programs
that range in price between several hundred dollars
to $10,000 for a program that is maybe six weeks
and is operating two undergraduate courses
that you would then get on a transcript to
apply later to your college or university of choice. So for pre-college programs,
we have open enrollment. And these are mostly for
the non-credit programs. And then selective
enrollment– we want to make sure
when we admit you to take an undergraduate
course or a program that’s going to give you a transcript
to a US college or university that you are well-qualified
to take that class. So we will take a look at
your academic performance. We look at a transcript
from your high school. We will look at letters
of recommendation. We sometimes require a
writing sample or a statement of interest– why are you
interested in our program, why this program at our institution
and not somebody else’s program, just to make
sure that your intent is to come to the US to study
and to do well in class, and that you understand
what’s at stake. Sometimes we will
take test scores. So for international students
whose first language is not English, you will need to
submit your TOEFL scores. And a lot of us are branching
outside of the TOEFL market and will take Pearson’s or
the TOEIC or any other test. And we have equivalency
scores, so we are able to gauge whether
your English ability is sufficient to allow you to
be successful in the program. And then if you
do require the F1, the student visa, then
financial support documents are also required. I don’t know if we want
to pause for a little bit. Are there any questions? We’re just kind of
at the halfway mark. I see everyone’s kind of asking
questions on the side there, so I think that
we’re in good shape. So really, you should
think of applying to a pre-college
program as applying as a mini-admissions process. So if anything,
it’s great practice in the exercise of an
undergraduate application, because you’re
probably completing a lot of the same
steps that you would complete for an undergraduate
bachelor’s degree. Now, the summer programs
offer courses for credit. And as I said before,
usually the primary audience is the students
that are normally enrolled at the
institution, whether at the undergrad or grad level. And so all of the courses
that we teach at John Hopkins apply toward the
John Hopkins degree. And as a visiting student, you
would receive a John Hopkins transcript, an
official transcript, an official university
record with the name of the course that you took,
the number of credit hours that you earned, and
then your letter grade. And we have students from
all over the world and all over the country that
come and take our classes. Most of the students are
taking our math online programs or they might be doing
a science course. But I know that very often,
students that live in the area are the ones enrolling or
matriculating in institutions that are near their homes. So they’re not
necessarily taking classes at their home institution where
they’re getting their degree, but going to a university
that’s closer to home. So for John Hopkins, we are
an international university. But we do have a lot of
students from the New Jersey, New York, Florida area. And I know that our
students take many classes at Rutgers University. They receive the
official transcript and then they transfer those
credits toward their degree program, toward prerequisites
usually, or a minor. Now, what we normally
tell students is, if you are attending
a university already, that you’ve received advanced
approval to take the classes. And our summer programs are
used to the visiting students. So normally, we will
have our summer schedule up in November, December,
or January, and very closely followed by the
posting of syllabi. So if your advisor requires
a syllabus before they will approve the class, contact
the summer programs office and it can provide that, or
you can contact the professor. But most of the students that
are enrolled in our summer programs are making some
progress toward their degree, so either taking a
prerequisite class or getting courses on
their record just in case you’re thinking about
studying abroad. Or maybe they have
what they know will be a very intensive fall
semester or spring semester, and they want to reduce
their credit load then. So they might take a
summer class or two so that in the fall, they can
take 12 credit hours instead of 15 credit hours. And that helps them. Again, they’re
earning credit faster over five weeks or six weeks. They are very often
not graduating earlier. I think what we found, at
least from our association and in speaking to other summer
programs directors and deans, really, the students are
not there with the intent to graduate earlier. But sometimes they
want a second major or they want to
minor in something, or they’re trying to
get ahead somehow. So many students are
conditioning earlier, which is to say four
that last semester their senior year in school
and do an internship and two courses. Now, some students will
be in the classroom to improve their grade. If they didn’t do well
the first time around, they can retake the course
at their home institution and that grade absolves
the lower grade. But that’s really the exception. I think even at
competitive schools, you’ll find that most of
the students in the class are there are self-selected. There’s an intention to learn. There’s a reason for
them being there. And so that just leads
to greater learning, I think, overall. And by taking a summer
class, they are then not forced to take a full load. Sometimes they can go to
school part time and work. So for adult learners,
it’s really important. It’s sometimes important
for graduate students that they can reduce their
academic year courseload, especially if they’re
working at the same time that they’re getting
their degree. And usually, the enrollment
for summer will vary. So at my institution, we
have just over 2,000 students enrolled. And I know, for instance,
Arizona State University has over 20,000 summer students. And so the size
of the institution will really vary
from state school to public, from
urban to rural areas. We’re all pretty
much the full gamut in summer programs,
the same way it would be for undergrad
or graduate school. And so as I mentioned, there
is a schedule of classes that each of our
universities would post. With the general education
courses, a lot of us teach the gen ed courses. So they would be like your
Introduction to Psychology or Calculus 1 or
Pre-calculus, Introduction to Philosophy, those
types of courses that are general requirements
toward an undergraduate degree. And then some of us have very
discipline-specific courses that will vary from
campus to campus depending on our academic strengths. Some of us are able
to teach courses over many different periods. We’re not limited to
two five-week terms. Some may have two-week programs
or three-week programs. So really, as you’re looking
for these courses and programs, there’s some research
that you need to do. And I mentioned
the NAASS.org site, where you can get the direct
email addresses for the summer programs offices where you
could ask your questions. And again, you would
leave the program with an academic transcript. And one thing that
I didn’t mention, but most universities
are offering some type of tuition discount
in the summertime, some as high as 50%. And the reason being
is that there’s very little to no financial
aid for US students. And so some institutions’
way of helping financially is to reduce the tuition. And so some state
schools, for instance, some public
institutions may offer in state tuition rather than
the out of state tuition, which is more costly. So depending on whether
it’s public or private, you may get different
tuition rates. And other schools–
some schools are not able to discount at all. And it will depend on their
state and their budgets. Again, the same thing
that I mentioned for the pre-college
programs, also very important for courses for credit. Whether you’re an
undergrad or grad student, you want to make sure
that the school is offering strong academic
support for all students, not just for their
own undergraduates, but that they open those
doors, the writing centers and tutoring to
visiting students. That’s very important
in the success of your– in student success
and it’s something that we certainly offer here. And I think most
of my colleagues are offering
writing center help, tutoring, sometimes
advising help, just having general access so
that you are successful academically. And the student services
that I mentioned, especially for students coming
from outside the country, it’s very important that
there are on-campus student services or easy access. If you’re coming
on a tourist visa, sometimes the traveler’s
insurance is not enough. And some institutions are
requiring that you purchase medical plan through them. And since we are advocates
for summer programs, we work with our institutions
to deliver good student health services and also to connect
you with medical insurance on a short term basis. So we’re really good resources
in helping you through that. And most of the
institutions that are accepting students,
international students in the summertime
have worked this out. And so I think that you should
contact the program, the summer programs office. You have access to
the fitness centers if you want to continue
practicing your tennis or if you want to
play football soccer and you want to
get a pick up game. Do you have access
to those facilities? And also the
residential options– if you’re in an urban
school that does not have a lot of on-campus
housing, then that may be a cost factor for you. Other campuses that have the
more traditional dormitories would be able to rent
you a room and you would able to live either
with an American student or with another
international student. What we try to do here is to
have linguistic differences in the dormitory so that
we make sure that students that speak the same
native language are not paired together. And certainly, the
best case scenario would be to pair you up
with an American student so that you do get to know what
it’s like to attend college or university in the US. So the cultural
immersion part of it is very important– the social
life outside the classroom, and what we can do to help you
learn about American culture while you’re here. So we may go– in our
area, we have a lot of, besides the Civil War
fields and Fort McHenry, we also are very close
to Washington DC. There’s free access to museums. A big part of the
US in the summertime is going to amusement parks. And we have several
within short distances. We would get an
excursion planned and take you to
the amusement park for a day of stress relief. So things like that are
enhancing the programs. They’re helping you connect with
students at our own institution as well as students
from all over the world and at other institutions
across the country. I went to Georgetown
University for undergrad. And we have the number one
basketball team, the Hoyas. And I know that if
Syracuse is listening, if Chris Cofer, my colleague
at Syracuse University Summer Program, he will beg to differ. But a lot of what we do in the
summertime too is sports teams. You may find through our
campus services offices that they offer camps. And you might have a
lacrosse camp or a sports camp for pre-college students. So that’s something
else to look into. But all of the
programs are really hoping that you will
transition into a university setting that’s exposing
you to the American culture that you’re learning and
you’re living in the culture, and that whatever you’re
doing academically is enriching your
academic experience, your undergrad degree. It’s all about the mission
of our universities and what we’re offering. So I think as we’re planning
our summer curricula, we’re going to look for
programs and courses that align with our
institutional missions, whether that be, on
some campuses like ours, where our mission
statement for Johns Hopkins includes knowledge
for the world. And that gives us
the opportunity to accept international
students and to really have a global culture in some
of our courses and programs. And experiencing the
campus life, what it’s like to eat
in the dining hall, to have a roommate– for
a lot of our students, they have never had
to room with anybody. They’ve had their
own rooms at home. And so coming to
campus and learning how to live with
someone for five weeks and just learning the social
skills and the language and maybe acquiring some
strategies to help you in case you’re thinking about
studying in the US full time, studying in the US as an
undergrad or grad student. And everything that I mentioned
before on the transcript, the earning the credit in
the shorter time, meeting students that are like you,
are interested in the things that you’re interested
in, that are giving up part of their summer to
study something that’s important to them and being in
the same classroom with them I think is what we
would all take pride in. And in general as I mentioned,
the classes are smaller. And so you do have more
chances for interaction. Faculty can get to
know you as a person as well as in the classroom. And especially if you’re taking
part in experiential programs or community service or
service learning programs where you are involved with
faculty and practitioners, I think this is just giving
you a good overall experience. Some courses are also able
to link you to internships. But sometimes those are
more limited to students at our own
institutions, just given the number of internships
that are available and what’s taken up
by our undergraduates in the springtime. So as I mentioned, we are
teaming up with EducationUSA in Montreal. They’re going to be
at the North American Association of Summer
Sessions conference at the Sheraton Center. And we have set aside some time
for students to come visit us, to talk about summer
programs, to learn about the different summer
programs that we’re offering. And these are the institutions
that are participating. But we do have schools
that are added every day. There’s a total of 150 schools
from across the country that are attending. I know that we’ve
added just today St. Louis University,
Purdue University, and University of Pennsylvania
will also join us. And the people that
you will be speaking to are folks that are directors
that are very closely linked to the academic departments
at our institutions and setting up the
summer courses as well as special programs. So hopefully, you’re
able to join us from 6:00 to 8:00 PM on
Tuesday, November 10. That is what I had to say to
you regarding summer programs. I think you can tell that
I’m passionate about them. I have been doing summer
programs for over 30 years. And I really think that
it’s a valuable time. My own children have
taken summer classes. One of them did a film
course at Catholic University when he was a high
school student. And my daughter is really
into criminal minds and she did an abnormal
psychology class. So I think for them,
just meeting students from all over the country,
all over the world was really important. It’s not something that high
school students or sometimes undergraduates at state schools
don’t have as much access to learn from
different communities. And I think that was a
valuable experience for them. So I think when you meet the
different schools in Montreal, you’ll find that
there are all just as passionate about
their programs. And remember, it’s about fit. It’s about where you
want to be, the location, and what you want to study. And with that, I’ll turn it over
to Jenika, who will continue. JENIKA HEIM: Great, and
Jessica, before you jump off, this is a good chance if
anybody has any other questions, please put them in the chat. And I actually have
a question that I get quite a bit
from students which is, if a student
is very interested, let’s say a pre-college
student is very interested in a specific
university and plans on applying to that university,
will taking a summer course better their chances of being
admitted to that university? JESSICA MADRIGAL:
I think it would depend on the university and the
selectivity of the university. So it certainly gives
them an advantage in terms of meeting
faculty, of meeting students in that institution,
making sure that it is the right fit for them. What we hear from our
admissions officers– so I’ve talked to several. And usually, when we do these
fairs with summer folks, that question always comes up. And the way that we answer
is a little bit different depending on the school. Some schools will
say, this tells us that you are very interested
in attending our program. So we will actually flag
you and we’ll look at you in a different light. Other schools will say, well,
there’s really no guarantee. So the way I always
answer that combines my 30 years in the field
and also just talking to different admissions
officers or admissions directors that have been here at Hopkins. What they say is they
look at the whole picture, but the fact that you are
taking an undergraduate course while you’re still
in high school and you’re giving up
part of your summer leads them to paint a better
picture of your academic goals. They know that you’re going
to be a serious student. They know that you’ve
been at Hopkins, and that you liked
the institution, you want to continue
for four years. But it won’t give you that
extra edge at our school. With that said, what I can do is
point to– I think about a year and a half ago, we
were celebrating our 20th anniversary of
pre-college programs here. And we found that we had
close to 50 students that had attended pre-college at
Hopkins who were enrolled. So I think we’re a very
highly selective institution. That’s a good number. No indication of
the future, though. JENIKA HEIM: And what
I tell students– and you’ve reinforced
this– is it won’t hurt their application. That’s for sure,
because of [INAUDIBLE] JESSICA MADRIGAL: It is
definitely that, Jenika. Students that have not done
their best at our summer program have received admission. And students that have gotten
A pluses– because we do have A plus grades here–
that have not been admitted. So I think that
really goes to what’s the statement of purpose? How are you
differentiating yourself from other students
that are applying? And really, I think those
admissions officers really have a difficult job in
figuring out the class. And it’s a tough job
for them, but yeah, I don’t think it can
hurt, even if you don’t do as well as you normally do. JENIKA HEIM: Yeah of course. And just make sure that you
are not a behavioral issue on campus either. I think that’s a
really important– to take it seriously. Well, thank you
so much, Jessica. I’ll just go ahead
and wrap this up here. All that information
was incredibly helpful. And of course, if you have
any questions afterwards, Jessica can answer them. I can forward questions
to her through my email or if you’d like to share
your email, feel free. JESSICA MADRIGAL: Yes,
you can write to me. I’m sorry I didn’t include
that in my PowerPoint. I should have. Our email here is
summeratjhu.edu. JENIKA HEIM: Great. And so just a little
more information as we wrap up here, so
EducationUSA and Fulbright Canada and the US
Department of State are associated with a
wonderful summer program called Youth Ambassadors. And this is a great opportunity. Just to remind you that if you
fall within the eligibility requirements, I highly encourage
you to apply for this program. It is a very selective
summer program. It’s a three week exchange
to the United States in conjunction with SUNY
Plattsburgh in New York. Besides SUNY-Plattsburgh,
you also visit New York City
and Washington, DC. You must be a Canadian citizen
between 15 and 18 years old, and you cannot be graduating
in the spring of 2016, which means that you are in
grade 12, you’re ineligible, or if you’re in Quebec grade
11, you would be eligible. But you could apply as
[INAUDIBLE] 1 first year student. We’re looking to represent
the diversity of Canada, so we really want
students from all over. And part of the program is you
will learn community, service learning, leadership skills. And when you return, you will
complete a community service project in your high
school or community. It’s a very cool program. If you’re eligible, I highly
encourage you to apply. And last but not least,
just some information about following
EducationUSA Canada. We are all over the internet. We just opened an
Instagram account. As you can see, there’s
an amazing picture there with me wearing some very
festive American sunglasses. But besides really
cool pictures, we have some great
tips and information on our Twitter page
and Facebook account. So please, if you aren’t
already, follow us there. Check out our web page. There’s lots of great
information there. This particular webinar
and any previous webinar is put up on our
YouTube channel. So I’ll email that
out to all of you, and please catch up on any
other topics of interest. Join me one more time
in thanking Jessica. Thank you all for joining us. And we hope to see you. If you’re local,
we hope to see you in Montreal for the NAASS
fair, 6:00 to 8:00 PM, and it’s November 10, correct? JESSICA MADRIGAL:
It is on November 10 at the Sheraton Center. JENIKA HEIM: 2015. Thank you. Have a great day. JESSICA MADRIGAL: Thank you,
all of you, for joining.