State of the Division 2019, Presentations

State of the Division 2019, Presentations

October 18, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– We are now gonna be switching gears. We have three staff
presentations we’ll hear from and the first group that is up from the Public Service Center, Andrea Wise, Ashley Kelly, and Jane McKay. (cheering) (upbeat music) – Good morning. I hope our presentation is
better than my Zumba skills were. Again, I’m Andrea Wise with
the Public Service Center and we’re excited to share
three different examples of the PSC living into the
divisions pillar of community. So we’re each gonna share a story of how community shows up in our work. So for 10 years, we have
worked in partnership with the American Culture Center on campus to support American Cultures
Engaged Scholarship, or ACES. As you might know, every student takes an American cultures class to graduate and those classes focus on
race, ethnicity, and culture. So some of those courses actually include an community engagement component and our role is to support
faculty and students in best practices for that work. This year, as part of our ACES work, we’re offering a new opportunity
open to graduate students. Over the years, graduates students have self-reported finding challenges and feeling dissuaded
from connecting their social justice interests
to their academic work, as you can see in the quotes above. We put a call out to graduate students for a graduate learning
community on scholar activism, where they could bring their activism and their social justice work together with their academic pursuits and the response was really exciting. We received over 40 applicants and will have a group of 30 students from over 20 different
disciplines across campus. Students with meet with
community partners, with faculty who are living out UC Berkeley’s social justice mission, and most importantly, they’ll
have the opportunity to learn from each other and
to build community together. So keep your eyes out. We hope to share back
some of their learning and their work with you in the future. And now I’ll pass the mic
along to Ashley Kelly, who’s gonna highlight some of our work with community partners. (applause) – Hi everyone, good morning. As Andrea mentioned, my
name is Ashley Kelly. I’m one of the program managers in the Public Service Center. And one of the programs I support is the public service internships program, which is an academic year
long internship program for undergraduate students
who want to explore what career possibilities are available if they’re interested in
organizing non-profits, local government opportunities, or working in movement spaces. And since 2017, this
program has grown from 19 community partners and 19 interns to 28 community partners and 40 interns. And we couldn’t make all of this possible without the support of
our community partners. And in the Public Service Center, partnership for us means
opening the resources up on this campus up to our partners and doing everything we can to offer them reciprocal relationships. And one of the ways that we demonstrate the way that we value partnership is I think the supervisors themselves. Many of them are Cal alum, many of them share the
experiences of our students, they were first generation
college students, they were students of color, and they really understand
the needs that students have when they’re in internship, and really take their task seriously to open up to them what does it mean to be a
professional in this environment? What kinds of perspectives
and skill sets do you need? And they really see this as
an opportunity to give back. And one of our most
standout examples of this is our contact and liaison to the city of San Pablo, Bertha Romo. She’s the city of San Pablo’s
youth services coordinator, and pictured here on the bottom corner. And Bertha is an alum of the public service internships program. Her start in local government
came from her participation and she reached out to me last year and we started working with four interns and three city departments. And this year we have
expanded to eight interns and six city departments. And Bertha consistently goes above and beyond as a supervisor. She makes sure that the
students have meaningful work and opportunities to work on things like building the first scholarship
program hosted by the city and had another intern
work on a salary study. She additionally brings this
community of interns together for shadowing and
networking opportunities. And sometimes they’re
in high level meetings that her in her own capacity she’s not able to participate in, but our interns have access to that space. And the 2018-2019 interns were honored for their contributions at
a city council meeting where they shared their work experiences, some insights and reflections they have, and even what they’d like to do next given their experience. So we look forward to continuing to build a relationship with them at the Public Service Center
with our intern program, and additionally with faculty as they have now been
connected to our ACES work. So next we’ll have a student
form the Public Service Center. (audience cheering) – Hi, I’m Jane, I’m an
undergraduate student here and I’m also a program manager for CREATE, which is one of the many
student run and lead programs operating out of the
Public Service Center. So our program volunteers to
teach art enrichment courses in the Berkeley Oakland area at school sites and community centers in four different disciplines: creative writing, dance,
theater, and visual arts. We are currently at 10
sites with 20 classes and we’re reaching upwards of
300 students this year alone. In CREATE, we see
ourselves as working more with community partners and
try to not thing of that we are serving or helping people. And so we wanted to bring that mindset into the Public Service Center space. So we collaborated with
the Public Service Center. Me and my fellow program
managers Olivia Amezcua and Lenay Chow Schroeder in
creating a mural for the space. So we were honored to give back
to the Public Service Center since we spend so much time there, both working in our program
and studying for classes. So we all came in over the summer, driving up together from San Diego, and we worked for four days straight, and we had a bunch of friends
come in and help us paint. For the subject of the mural, we thought, that’s a time-lapse of us painting it. For the subject of the mural, we thought about how CREATE approached its community partnerships and we came to the idea of
painting a community garden where people are working
together towards a common good. And looking a the mural,
there is no indication of who is a community member
and who’s providing service. And so everyone is working
together to grow this garden and all of them are going to benefit from the work that is put in just like programs do
out in the communities. Yeah, so we welcome you to
come the Public Service Center. It’s over in Eshleman,
that building over there. It’s on floor two. Please come and see our mural. And thank you for having us. (applause) – Let’s give up for
Andrea, Ashley, and Jane. Thank you so much. (applause) Our next staff presentation is from Cori Evans and Kimberly Guess from University Health Services. Let’s give them a round of applause. ♪ But you gotta keep
your head up, ooh ooh, ♪ ♪ And you can let your
hair down, hey hey, ♪ ♪ You gotta keep your head up, ooh ooh, ♪ ♪ And you can let your
hair down, hey, hey. ♪ – Thank you so much. Hello again, my name is Corey Evans and I am with the We Work Wellness Program and I’m joined here
today by Kimberly Guess, our wellness program dietician. Fun fact today, it is a
California clean air day. How many of you knew that? No? Okay. All right, right on. And it’s already zero waste October. So, while we’re looking at
the health of our ecosystem and our communities, it is important today to also look at the environment of our campus community. I’d like to start with an
analogy, a fish analogy. Happy fish. If we sit back and think
about our work environment, our campus community, and the
number of social interactions, and the number of hours each day at work that we work together. We eat, we exercise together, you might think it’s like
a little fishbowl, right? I’m in a fishbowl. We constantly interact
in this work environment. One of our many roles
at the Be Well at Work is to equip you with the
tools, the resources, education, on how to live healthier and support your overall wellbeing, like eating some broccoli,
exercising, being better. Now imagine all the great programs like Work Fit offered here
through Work Rec Sports, services like Know Your Numbers, and workshops like Kim’s cooking classes. If you haven’t gone
before, you should join. What a great work environment, right? What if I told you it’s just not enough and the fishbowl is polluted? What happens when you’re understaffed and you can’t get away
to the Work Fit class? Or what happens when your
stress levels are so high and you go attend Know Your Numbers, but you’re blood pressure’s also high, your glucose levels are also high. And while Know Your Numbers
is a good wake up call, it won’t take away the stress. Finally, what if you can’t
afford nutritious, organic foods? Or food at all? Or your colleagues are
always bringing in desserts and food that tastes great, oh I have some victims over here? Okay. (laughing) But aren’t always good
for you mind or your body? Our environment matters
and here’s the reality. You change the environment,
you can change the people. We are working to create a sustainable healthy workplace
and campus environment where healthy habits are promoted, encouraged, and sustainable. No one wants to swim, live,
or eat in the murky fishbowl. Are you with me, anyone? Exactly. We want to thrive in the clean one. The Healthy Department Certification and Eat Well Berkeley are two
such initiatives designed to create a healthier campus
and workplace community. The Health Department Certification provides departments with evidence-based workplace recommendations
that strives to reduce, excuse me, educate departments on what it means to be healthy, create workplaces that engage, motivate, and make this a place where you want to be your
best self at all times. You wanna show up and do your job. Maintain sustainable practices that support the wellbeing of
students, staff, and faculty. We call them the healthy
workplace principles. And for example, we have
evaluate departments on their wellness leadership,
their organizational support, their wellness sustainability,
like the built environment, equity inclusion, the food environment, and the list goes on. I encourage you to go to the Healthy Department Certification
webpage to learn more. Applications are open
through December 2nd. And I also wanna mention
that we currently have 11 departments that are currently certified healthy on this campus. And if you’re one of
them, congratulations, thank you for doing your part. We know changing the
environment is not easy work, however environmental
initiatives such as the Healthy Department Certification
and Eat Well Berkeley are striving to have a sustainable impact. More to talk about Eat
Well Berkeley is Kim Guess. (applause) – Thank you. Hi everybody. So about how many of
you have a general idea of what healthy eating is? Raise your hand. If you have a pretty good idea, vegetables, you wanna eat those. So the issue is not knowing what to eat or not even making those choices, but having those choices
available in the first place. So if we tell fish to eat broccoli, it’s not really that helpful unless we put the broccoli
in the fishbowl for them. And in case you’re wondering,
fish can actually eat small amounts of blanched broccoli. I looked that up, fun fact. (laughing) – So Eat Well Berkeley
is one of our programs that addresses the food
environment, specifically. And it’s all about making
healthy choices accessible. And a key component of
that is implementing the UC Berkeley Food and
Beverage Choices Policy and this video can explain that. (upbeat music) – [Narrator] Students, staff, faculty, visitors, and consumers in general, are becoming more and more
interested in eating healthy. However, health education alone doesn’t always produce
lasting behavior change. Thanks to the UC Berkeley Food
and Beverages Choices policy, nutritious and sustainable
options will be more accessible. By making the healthy
choice the easy choice, we can create an environment conducive to good health and well-being. As of January one, 2019, many campus restaurants
and retail markets, vending machines, athletic
concessions, and events are required to comply with the policy. Those with leases or contracts must comply once their agreement is renewed. This policy focuses on making the healthy choice the easy choice rather than taking choices away. Look for the Eat Well Berkeley sign on participating restaurants, retail markets, and concession stands. Some restaurants are exempt, but can choose to voluntarily participate through the Eat Well Berkeley program. University personnel ordering catering for University sponsored
meetings and events can work with an Eat
Well Berkeley caterer, who will make it easy to
choose healthy options. And finally, at least half of the options in snack vending machines
meat the nutrition standards and are indicated with a green label. Overall, food and beverage marketing, pricing, and product placement on campus will prioritize healthier options. If you are one of the many folks making an effort to eat well, look for the Eat Well Berkeley
logo on and around campus. Support businesses that
offer healthy options. Give them feedback or give feedback to the Food and Beverage Choices
Policy advisory committee that oversees this policy, made up of registered dietitians and other public health experts. University personnel can learn even more about planning healthy meetings and events by using the healthy
meeting and event guide and can find more resources at uhs.berkeley.edu/healthymeetings. Learn more at the Food and
Beverages Choices Policy webpage. (upbeat music) – [Kimberly] Oh, thank you. (applause) So I’d just like to reiterate that this policy is all about choices. We’re not here to tell you what to eat or don’t eat that or take this away. It’s just about having
those choices be available. And when it’s not always
obvious which choice is healthy, you can look for our yellow check mark at participating restaurants and caterers. So one thing that you
can do to help contribute to a healthy environment
as employees and staff is if you are planning meetings or events, to include some nutritious
and sustainable options. And this lunch that we’re having today will be a nice example of that. I’d also like to quickly
tell you about the healthy beverage initiative, which fits in nicely with the Food and Beverage Choices Policy. This is actually a system wide initiative to promote access to tap water as a healthy alternative to
sugar sweetened beverages and reduce consumption of sugary drinks. So we will be assessing all drinking water access points on campus like refill stations and water fountains, as well as looking at outlets
that sell sugary drinks. From there, we’ll be installing
new hydration stations and retrofitting water
fountains with bottle fillers, as well as installing promotional signage. As for the sugar sweetened drinks, there are already measures in place to try to encourage people to
choose the healthier options, nudging them towards the healthier options by doing things like
pricing the healthier choice lower or equal to the sugary option or even just placing the healthier choices in the best selling locations. So if you’d like to learn more about our efforts to create a
healthy campus environment, you can check out our website and as we leave the stage, maybe just think about
one thing that you can do to help contribute to a healthy campus. Thank you. (applause) – Round of applause for Cori and Kimberly. (applause) And our final staff presentation for today is from the Financial Aid and Scholarships Office, Marcus Hill. Let’s a round of applause for Marcus. ♪ Survivor stalks his prey in the night ♪ ♪ And he’s watchin’ us all
with the eye of the tiger. ♪ – Good morning everyone. – [Group] Morning. – Hope that little intro
music’s got you pumped up, ready to tackle the day or
maybe tackle staffing needs. I feel that the next presentation (laughing) kind of addresses that
issue of staffing needs and unfortunately Blanca Nuila, who directed this entire presentation and the Work-Study program
was not able to attend. But I’m very happy to
share the wonderful work that her unit does with Financial Aid and Scholarships Office and
I hope you all enjoy, too. – [Narrator] What does
$10 million mean to you? Does it mean wealth? A lottery jackpot? The cost of a house in the Bay Area? Life goals? Is it just a number? So the UC Berkeley Work-Study program, $10 million is the gross
earnings of over 3,000 students who participated in the program last year. More than 25% of Work-Study students are employed by student affairs. So there’s a high chance you’ve
met one of the individuals contributing to this eight figure success. Our federally and universally
funded financial aid program is available to qualifying students as determined by their
financial aid application, and their financial need. Work-Study encourages students
to seek part-time employment while they are enrolled in school, so they have a greater
opportunity to earn, rather than borrow money, to
pay for educational expenses. This factors into why UC Berkeley students generally borrow less
than the national average. While these numbers are wonderful for our students’ bank accounts, this isn’t the only focus of the program. Work-Study strives to improve
the student experience. One way we achieve this is by
giving students access to work with the schedule flexibility they need so they can have a healthy balance between their school commitments
and their work obligations. After all, they are
here on campus to learn not to stress about how they’re gonna pay for all that learning. Again, these students are
already working with you. Over 3,800 students work
in at least one position and many hold more than one. They’re employed in over 100
kinds of jobs across industries in UC Berkeley departments,
at other UC campuses, for the UC Press and
Office of the President, and in both non-profit and government organizations off campus. We even have the option to
allow for profit businesses to become Work-Study employers. However, one of the most
important and meaningful things about the Work-Study
program is that the jobs, the work, is not created
just to cater to students, but rather students are
working in these spaces because there’s an actual need for their skills and efforts in our business. The major draw for Work-Study employers is that the program
incentivizes hiring students by offering an hourly
wage or salary subsidy for participating student staff. Employers pay a net 50% of eligible wages and Work-Study subsidizes the rest up to that student’s earnings limit. The program gives employers access to a part-time subsidized labor pool to meet their business needs, while concurrently meeting the
students’ needs for income. Nearly 300 Berkeley campus departments receive the benefit of the reduced cost of employing students and receive
the benefits of their labor. But let’s go beyond the job talk and highlight a few other
maybe lesser known benefits of the Work-Study program. Work-Study’s collaboration
with campus and local employers helps strengthen Berkeley’s
campus-community relations. Furthermore, our efforts
are contributing to successfully recruiting and retaining students from low income families. The program offers these
families a path to empowerment. They apply because they see an opportunity to fund their education. Having such a robust Work-Study program is an important factor in
maintaining the affordability of a UC Berkeley education for all. In terms of the rest of the UC system, we are yet again leading the way. UC Berkeley has the largest Work-Study program of all UC campuses. We account of 28% of all
Work-Study earnings in the system. This is where that $10 million earnings figure really comes into focus. Most importantly, the Work-Study program is helping students prepare
for their future careers in exposure to job opportunities,
build their networks, and understand how to be
a successful team player, not only with their colleagues, but also with the communities
in which they operate. This is why the Work-Study
program encourages students who receive federal financial assistance to participate in community
service activities that will benefit the nation and help foster a sense
of social responsibility and commitment to the community. One such program is BUILD, run out of Student Affairs
own Public Service Center. BUILD is one of the largest
reading programs in the East Bay with over 200 mentors. All of their wages are
paid through Work-Study. These mentors provide
one-to-one literacy support to 850 youth throughout our community, promoting learning and
equitable access to education for kids from all backgrounds. UC Berkeley students
love working for BUILD, but you don’t have to take my word for it. – [Interviewer] Whenever you’re ready. – Okay, my name is Briana Mosley. I am a fourth year here at Cal and my major is social welfare and I have a minor in education. – [Interviewer] Nice, okay, and then why are you a BUILD director? – I’m a BUILD director because
I love working with kids. It’s something that
I’ve done my entire life and in BUILD we are able to
just brighten people’s days, brighten the kids’ days, and it’s just wonderful
to see the kids having fun and learning at the same time. – [Interviewer] Awesome,
okay, and why do you think BUILD is important? – BUILD is really important
because this education system, in a lot of ways, puts
marginalized voices down and so with BUILD we are really working on uplifting those narratives
and making sure that these kids have a really good time while learning and while being educated and have more of a positive connection to education as a whole. – [Interviewer] Is there anything else you wanna add about BUILD? – (laughing) Just that BUILD
is an incredible program. Honestly, I can’t imagine
my time here at Cal without doing BUILD. There’s no way to separate
those two experiences for me. BUILD has been such a
positive part of my life and I really hope that it’s just as positive of a part
of other people’s lives who are also in the program. – Hi, my name is Brian Ramirez. I’m a fourth year at UC Berkeley and I’m studying urban studies. – [Interviewer] Okay, first question is why are you in BUILD? – I’m in BULID because I like
working with communities, specifically children. I have a long history
of working at schools, with kids of all ages, and
I thought BUILD would be a perfect opportunity
to continue that work. – [Interviewer] Okay,
why is BUILD important? – BUILD is important because you could see all throughout the Untied States
such educational inequities in elementary schools,
middle schools, high schools, and it should be a priority of society to go into these schools
and offer their service through educational programs like BUILD. – [Interviewer] Thank you. Is there anything else you’d
like to add about BUILD? – I think BUILD is an amazing opportunity for Berkeley undergrads to get
out of this Berkeley bubble that we’re usually in and
explore different communities and also give back while we’re here. I think it’s very, very
important for us to give back, especially if you’re
not from the community. So while you’re here, actually
have a positive impact. (inspiring music) – [Cruz] I am deeply grateful
for the Work-Study program. My own Work-Study study so many years ago paved the way for me to
serve in my current role as Assistance Vice Chancellor and Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships at the University of California Berkeley. And it is in this role
that I have the privilege to work with an amazing
group of colleagues. The Work-Study team is
a remarkable example of effective cross divisional collaboration and support
comprised of members from three separate units
within Student Affairs, the Financial Aid and Scholarships Office, Student Affairs IT, and
Student Affairs Administration. The team is super high-functioning and they know their stuff. They hold each other to high standards, share genuine respect and
regard for each other, and have a deep knowledge
of the program and tools crucial for proactively
and successfully managing this key program for the campus. On behalf of the students
and the campus community, gracias, thank you, and go bears. (inspiring music) – [Narrator] It takes a
lot of energy, expertise, and collaboration to run an expansive and impactful
program like Work-Study, so please join us in
appreciation and gratitude for the staff of the Financial
Aid and Scholarships Office, our business partners,
and the Berkeley community that makes this possible. (upbeat music) – Folks, let’s give it up for all three of our staff presentations. (applause) And now we will be having a special treat, a student performance. Reflejos de Mexico is Mexican
folklorico dance group that promotes cultural diversity. Reflejos is a non-profit
student led organization who strives to grow together
as a group and as individuals. Founded here at UC Berkeley, Reflejos is full of
ambitious young Cal students who are ready to interact,
serve, and educate on a social and cultural level
with our campus community. Let’s give a big round of
applause for Reflejos de Mexico. (applause) (upbeat Latin music) (applause)