State of the Division 2019, Closing

State of the Division 2019, Closing

October 23, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– For the last time today, I’ll be introducing,
again, our fearless leader. Our vice chancellor for the
division of Student Affairs, (warm rock music)
Steve Sutton. So give him, let’s give
him a round of applause, get the energy up! (“Beautiful Day” by U2) ♪ Sky falls, you feel like ♪ – A little bit more. Another round of applause,
louder, louder, louder! Louder! ♪ Don’t let it get away ♪ ♪ You’re on the road ♪ ♪ But you’ve got no destination ♪ ♪ You’re in the mud ♪ – Okay, well we are at the home stretch of this special event. When Ellen Topp told me that we were gonna have walk-up songs for
each of the presenters, I thought, well, that’s really cool. I’ve never had a walk-up song before. (audience laughs)
Maybe some of you do, maybe when you walk in the
kitchen in the morning, your walk-up song is being played as you’re grabbing your cup of coffee, but then I thought, how does one pick a walk-up song? I mean, there’s so much music out there, there’s so much music I know that I love, I love all kinds of different music. The Beatles, Coldplay, all
kinds of different things, but I landed on U2 ’cause I think that “It’s a Beautiful Day” is a
perfect song for us today. Not only is it literally a beautiful day here in Northern California, but it’s also beautiful day, I think, in terms of where we’re
going as an institution, where we’re going as a division. So, but it was a tough choice. I mean, I did consider
a few different songs that I might pick as my walk-up song. Of course, this is the fabulous U2 group. But I thought about,
well, maybe Ariana Grande. (audience laughs and woos) “Problem,” but that might
not really have the message I want to promote for our division, so then I thought, you know what? Maybe I’ll go back in time, I like international music. Now, there’s a band I used
to listen to from Australia. Actually, I went to their
concerts once upon a time. (audience laughs) The Wiggles. I know all of you know The Wiggles, right? If you don’t know The Wiggles, you gotta talk to a five-year-old. They will tell you who The Wiggles are, but “Hot Potato” is a
fabulous song, in my opinion. But no, that didn’t really
quite give the message that I wanted to promote, either, so then I thought, maybe
I’ll pick something more dramatic, more iconic, more epic that kind of relates to this occasion. (audience laughing) You know, the theme
song to Game of Thrones, and if you’re like me, I really hate to see Game of Thrones end. We won’t talk about the final episode, that’s for another conversation. (audience laughs) But that, again, is a
little more foreboding than what we really want it to be. This is the point where I
need to put my glasses on ’cause now I’m getting
to the serious stuff. But in actuality, I think Game of Thrones, you know, the refrain from Game of Thrones for the last few years was what? What would they say? Winter is coming, right? Winter is coming. And I think our campus has sort of been in a winter is coming space
for the last few years. We had this $150 million
structural deficit that we had to correct. And I know each person in this room worked really hard to do your part to make sure that we could
meet the expectations that the campus had on Student Affairs, in terms of correcting
that structural deficit. We have a large division, we have a large budget
compared to other divisions across the campus. And so, it was really
important for us to do our part and we did meet that challenge. We also worked really diligently in terms of making sure
that we could address all the needs of our division, even with reduced staff, even not being able to fill positions, even as we couldn’t use our reserves. So all these things have
been really important for us, but that then brings us back
to “It’s a Beautiful Day,” because I think that
that really speaks loudly to who we are today as a
division, in my opinion. These are some of the
efforts that our campus is invested in right now. These things should look familiar to you. You’ve gotten emails from the chancellor and others at different points in time about all of these campus efforts. Now, I’ve had the chance
to work in higher education for about 30 years, and never have I been in an institution that was tackling all these
things at the same time. I mean, this is quite a list. I mean, most campuses will
focus a strategic plan and then they go on and
implement that strategic plan. Or they will focus on a
major diversity initiative and then they will go on to implement that major diversity initiative. Not only are we doing those things, but we’re also trying to become an HSI, we’re going to double our housing, we’re working on a capital campaign. So it’s tremendously
exciting and a bit daunting, if you will, that all these
things are happening at once. But what does that actually
mean for our division? You saw this earlier, I wanna show it to you again. These are our four pillars that we’ve been talking
about in the last year. I had a chance recently to have a retreat up at Strawberry Canyon with
the Student Affairs cabinet, where we spent a day
and a half talking about student issues, staff issues, as well as, in essence, where
we’re going as a division. We spent a lot of time talking
about these four pillars. And we left that event realizing that there was more we could do in terms of bringing those to life. Bringing those to life for each of you. One of the things I
heard from the managers, the directors that are part
of the Student Affairs cabinet is some people in the division don’t know what all these things mean. They don’t know where they fit in. They don’t know how their
work on a daily basis is designed to implement
these four pillars. And so, this is something that is gonna be a focus of ours over
the next several months. It’s gonna be really important for us to better articulate
what these pillars mean, how they come to life, and how these interface with
all these other campus efforts that I showed you in the previous slide. So, as we jump into this, I wanna touch on a few stories. One the things that we
do in Student Affairs, one of the things we do well, I think, is capture numbers. Again, we have a large, diverse division and there’s so much that we do. Here is just a smattering
of some of those numbers, that 35,000 represents the number of Cal Student Central tickets that were managed last year. Yeah, that’s a lot.
(audience clapping) That’s almost one per student, right? Over 50,000 work orders
completed by RSP facilities. (audience clapping) As was mentioned in the
wonderful video previously, narrated by Beth Pearce, was that we have about
30% of our student workers are in the division of Student Affairs, which is a significant number. 30% of the workers across
campus, I should say. We provide over 15,000, that’s over 15,000
internship opportunities, which help about 80% of our
students graduate with a job or acceptance to grad school
once they leave Berkeley. And then we’re focused on reducing waste, so there’s so many things
that we do as a division that really enable us to
have a significant impact on the campus. But our story’s complex and it’s complex because of all the
different things that we do. This right here represents
some of the great work that our financial aid and
scholarship office has done this year on the day, what
they call the Big Event, which is when they push all the money or most of the money to our students. They distributed over $28
million more this year than we did last year. (audience cheering and clapping) That’s a lot of money. That’s a lot of financial
aid for our students, and then that’s what
helps 65% of our students graduate without any loan debt. Our story also has challenges. We heard our wonderful colleague from OP, Dr. Gillaut talk about basic needs. We know that that’s something
we address day in and day out. Our students still struggle, even as we help them reduce their debt, even as we have all these great programs and services throughout the division, we know that they still struggle with the cost of attendance. And not only do they
struggle with basic needs, but they also struggle
in terms of addressing mental health issues and the challenges and the stress that they feel transitioning to campus and
being a college student. Our Caps team, Counseling
and Psychological Services, has told us that they have
about a 18-20% increase from one year over the next in terms of students looking for service through what they do
there at the Tang Center. That’s significant! Now, we could probably spend time debating on whether that’s a good statistic or a bad statistic or an
indifferent statistic, but it is what it is in terms of more and more of our students are seeking assistance and help and support so that they can succeed inside
and outside the classroom. Our story is also a cause for celebration. This picture shows you
Golden Bear Orientation. As I talk to students and parents and other staff members on campus, I hear over and over
again about how wonderful our GBO experience is for our students. So I think that that is definitely
a cause for celebration. We’re always looking to
improve what we do in GBO. And we just finished the third year? Third iteration of GBO. And we’ll continue to make it better, but it’s having a significant
impact on students in terms of the community that
we build across the campus. Our story is also based in a
culture of care and support. We know so well that our
students really struggle, and we also struggle, or at least I should I struggle with the things that are
happening in our nation. I’m almost afraid to look at
my Twitter handle some days in terms of seeing what’s
happening out in the world. Because I know that things that
happen outside in the world, whether it’s in California
or the western half of the United States, or nationally, is gonna have an impact
on our student population and our campus population. Not excluding faculty and stuff. I know each of you might be impacted by the things that are
happening nationally, and that is something that is a concern that we have to be mindful of. This is just a quick list
of some of the things that are top of mind for our students, and this isn’t an exhaustive list, I’m sure each of you,
from your perspective, could add a dozen more things to this list in terms of the things that you see on a day-to-day basis with our students. But I think we have an opportunity to see our students as whole. We have an opportunity
to take what we know best in terms of student development theory and apply those things to
different student populations that we serve. And focus on how we can try to meet those critical needs for our students. We know that in that spirit of
a culture of care and support that equity is really critical for our entire campus community. This is a campus value of ours. Our chancellor talks about
inequity of experience for our students, so what
does that really mean? And I know many of you have seen a graphic like this or
maybe other graphics that represent the difference
between equality and equity, but it’s something that
we definitely pursue and we try to infuse in
the daily work that we do. This is why the campus
is embarking on things that are really important,
from my perspective, to promote that sense of equity. Like our Hispanic-serving initiative, or our Hispanic-serving
Institution Initiative that we are engaged in. That’s just beginning. That taskforce has
co-chairs, two co-chairs, vice chancellor Dubon and education professor Chris Gutierrez. Think they just had their
first meeting last Friday, I’m actually on that work group. The African American
Initiative is also something that is very much an important
initiative for our campus that is a bit older
than the HSI initiative, but something we continue to think about in terms of how we can use that initiative to reach out and support cohorts
of students on our campus in a unique and different way. That right there is our office of undergraduate admissions team, I’m surprised, I was
expecting to get a big– (audience cheering and clapping) Yeah. As we talk about the Campus
Diversity Initiative, this is a team I know
that’s very much in touch with what that means. They spend lots of time
on the ground out there, day in, day out, both in
California, across the nation, and even internationally,
doing what’s needed to tell the great story about Berkeley in terms of what we mean
for social mobility, what we stand for in terms of diversity, inclusion, and social justice. You probably know that 30%
of our California freshmen, about 55% of our transfer
students are low-income students. 28% of California freshmen and 51% of them are first generation college students, so the students that we admit, that we recruit and admit to Berkeley represent a very diverse community. And yet we know we can do more. That’s why we have the HSI initiative, that’s why we have the
the diversity initiatives, ’cause we want our student population to reflect our state population. And we’re not quite there yet. We have other programs and services that are helping to build community and support our students in terms of navigation and wellness. And I won’t even begin
to try to list those because I would inevitably
leave somebody out, but as I look across the room and know the areas that
each of you works in, I know that you do what you
can from your perspective to provide support for our students, either building community, helping them figure out
how to navigate the campus, and that’s very important. And so everyone has a role to contribute in terms of these goals and initiatives and I want you to ask yourself, how can I be engaged in making
these pillars actionable? What can I do for my spot, for my realm of influence, no matter how small or how large, to be able to bring
these pillars to action? I wanna touch on a few
of those other items that I mentioned when I talked
about the campus efforts, I’m gonna talk about a couple of those. So, we’re gonna hear a lot
about storytelling this year as we begin preparing
for our large campaign. Last I heard, it’s gonna
be in the $5 billion range, yes, that’s a B, $5 billion. Which is a huge, huge effort. We all have a role in that. The launch of that is going
to be on February 29th, so I encourage you to mark your calendars. You’re gonna see new
branding around the campus in terms of how we’re going
to roll out that campaign. This branding right here was for our, let’s see if I can say the word, sesquicentennial event that we had which ended a year ago, our 150th anniversary. The team that’s gonna help us do that is our Student Experience
and Diversity team. Do I have any members here today from SED? Hi, Jennifer! Jennifer’s back there in the back. (audience clapping) I know the rest of the team’s out there raising money, right? So, that’s a good thing. But this team has worked really hard. As you probably know already, the divisions of undergraduate education, Student Affairs, and equity and inclusion combined our efforts to
create one philanthropic team, the Student Experience and Diversity team. And so they’ve been a team
for a little over a year now. They’ve done tremendous work, lemme tell you a little
about what they’ve done. So, $19.2 million have been raised. And that’s in Student Affairs, yes. (audience clapping) Again, a big number. The number of donors
contributing to Student Affairs has increased by 77% since 2015. So again, that’s a tremendous
amount of increase. And due to the good work
of many of you last spring, we actually increased, that
last number over there, we increased the number of gifts during the big gift campaign
from 1,100 to over 4,300. So that’s a large increase, and so each of you is
to be thanked for that, for being a part of that. And in that effort, we raised
about $150,000 in 2018, and in 2019, about $223,000, so we’re hoping that that continues to be a very positive trend. So again, a couple of key dates. February 29th is when we’ll launch the campaign for Berkeley. And March 12th is Big Give, so I encourage you to
mark your calendars now. Lemme talk about housing now. Housing is a really important effort. Again, it was on that
list of campus efforts that are really critical for us. We know that the cost of attendance and basic needs and the
availability of housing are all wrapped up into one. There’s a lot that is being
done in terms of housing. Student Affairs works very
closely with capital projects and the vice chancellor for finance’s unit on furthering our housing efforts. Wanna just give you a little bit of information about housing. Right there, that you shows you from our former long-range development plan, what we want to try to achieve
in terms of campus housing for our various student populations. So what you see right here
is our existing housing. You know, we have
traditional freshman housing, we have apartment housing, and we have a mixture of both, right? But we don’t have nearly
the number of beds that we want to have. So, some of the sites
identified are listed there. And as our chancellor has said, we are going to build on all those sites. In order for us to achieve our goals, we are gonna build on all those sites. So, some of the feedback
I got during our retreat was that people had not heard about the housing initiative much in the last few months. And so I don’t want you to think that things aren’t happening behind the scenes in terms of what we’re doing
related to student housing. And of course, this is
going to impact our division in many, many different ways. We’re still unpacking
what that’s gonna like, I mean, obviously,
we’re gonna have to have more residence life staff, right? If we’re doubling our housing. Which is what the goal is. That means more RAs,
more resident directors, more assistant directors,
more programming dollars. It’s gonna have an impact on those of you that run campus offices ’cause students are gonna be closer, they’re gonna be living on campus. And there’s gonna be other impacts too that we probably even
haven’t figured out yet. But it’s gonna be important
for us to work together to make sure we’re
meeting all these needs. Let me go back. So, our goal then is to be able to expand the number of undergraduate students we have living on the campus as well as graduate students. One of the things that’s really important for us to keep in mind is
that we have an obligation to serve our graduate students as much as we do our
undergraduate students. Yes, there is a vice provost
for graduate education, graduate studies, and we work very closely with that leader, that new leader on campus. But that does not mean that we don’t have to continue to think of ways that we can serve graduate
students in our daily work. Okay, I’ve only got about 20 more slides, you said I got five minutes. So I’m gonna try to move fast here. So, we’ve talked about Blackwell Hall, this is our newest housing unit. And as you know, it’s very
popular with our students. I talked to many students that are just ecstatic that they have a chance to live in our newest building. These are, again, the
areas where we are going to be building new housing. The sites that were
identified a couple years ago on the committee that the provost, then she was the provost,
now our chancellor, co-chaired that committee. And this is just another
way of looking at it in terms of when these
new beds might come on. Now, that doesn’t mean it’s
gonna be smooth sailing. Because we know that there
will be bumps along the way because there’s lots
that has to be managed in terms of the environmental
impact of these new spaces and sequel requirements and going to the board of
regents and things like that, there’s a long list of
things that we need to do in order to get a building from a concept to opening its actual doors. But we’re gonna push forward
as much as we possibly can. Lemme talk about a few other things. You know, the campus went
through a seismic overview. I’m happy to report that our buildings are in fairly good shape, we don’t have any that
are rated dangerous, which is a good thing. We spent about $32 million
several summers ago on units one, two, and three, and you can what they looked like before and then the bracing
afterwards on those buildings. And that will be something
that we’ll continue to monitor and try to make sure that we have our buildings up to today’s standards as best as we possibly can. Again, the good news from
the chancellor’s office is that we actually addressed
our structural deficit a year early, that’s wonderful. (audience member claps) I heard one clap, yes. (audience laughing) (audience clapping) That’s great, I love that, yes. Change-maker right there, yes. But this will continue to be something that will need to be in
the forefront of our minds. This doesn’t mean that we can sit back now and just start spending money. We still need to continue to be diligent. We still know that we
have inflationary costs, supply costs go up one year to the next. Our compensation, rightfully so, goes up from one year to the next. We have major maintenance
and renovations issues. One of the things that’s
really important to me is that we be able to set money aside so we can continue to
make our residence halls and the other buildings
that we’re responsible for as comfortable as possible. You can’t take a building
that was built in 1963 and all of a sudden make it new without tearing it down and starting over, but there are ways that
we can invest dollars into those buildings to make sure that we’re making them as comfortable as possible for our students. That’s something that we will do. Here’s a picture of
what it might look like with some of the work that’s
being done around renovations. We also need to be innovative and entrepreneurial to increase revenue. One of the things that
the chancellor has said as we were working our way
through our structural deficit is that it’s not just
about reducing costs, but it’s about increasing revenue. And one of the things
that we have access to is something that business partners want, which is access to students. So, we have several areas, I think, where we will want to
engage in creative thinking, innovative thinking,
so we can try to think of ways to increase the
revenue coming to the division, whether that’s events
and conference services, our business development unit, the HUC student union, Cal
Dining, rec sports, youth camps, you name it, there’s lots of
ways for us to be creative. And we also, at the same time, need to make sure that we are investing in our staff members, our team members. This is a snapshot of how many staff we have in Student Affairs, we’re the largest division. Also, a snapshot in terms
of the number of students that work with us. Also, the largest number of employer, single largest employer
of students across campus, and so, again, that’s
a lot of aspirations, a lot of professional needs, a lot of desires that
folks bring to their work and we have to be mindful of that. And we have something called
Coffee with Colleagues, I’m sure many of you have been
to Coffee with Colleagues. Our next one, by the way, is Friday, so hopefully you’ll be able to come to Coffee of Colleagues. If you haven’t come to
Coffee of Colleagues, talk to one of your colleagues that has and ask them to bring
you, take you over there. It’s a wonderful way to meet
new team members and staff. But that’s just a very simple way that we can try to create
community within our division. And then we also have softball. (audience cheering and clapping) This has turned out to be a wonderful way for members of the division to get out and get their legs and arms moving, get some exercise or come out
and cheer for your colleagues if you prefer not to participate. A little friendly competition, we have a little friendly competition in terms of teams
competing with each other. It’s been so popular, we’re thinking about growing from four teams
to six teams next year. (audience cheering and clapping) Yeah. And the fun fact that they provided for me says we had 75 hot dogs and 60
Rice Krispie treats consumed, which I think is really
(audience laughing) pretty amazing. You know, we owe
intercollegiate athletics thanks for their support, you know, as we use the women’s field hockey space and they’re very gracious in terms of allowing us to use that space. (audience clapping) Also, a shout out to the Cal student store for helping us with uniforms. (audience cheering and clapping) And then we have
volunteer umpires as well. We also will continue to have the Professional Development Fund, which was something
that was a high priority for me two years ago. This is a way of ameliorating
some of the discrepancies across the division in terms of professional development dollars. So we have $100,000 set aside that each one of you can submit a request to have whatever professional
development activity you want to engage in funded through that. If you don’t have dollars in
your home office to do that. Lila Navanco is the
chair of that committee. (audience cheering and clapping) And I believe she just sent out an announcement this week, right? About that, so I encourage you
to apply for those dollars. And we’ll continue to
have our training days, last year we had six training days, 23 different sessions,
about 300 participants, and we’ll also use our round tables as a way to provide learning
opportunities for our team, so these are all ways that
we’re focusing on our staff. One of the most critical things that we do is recruit and hire people. And these are some recent searches that, well, I say recent, some
are as old as January or last fall. But these are folks that have joined us within the last year. And I believe Abbie’s on day three, right? And Francisco, where’s Francisco? He’s on day two, right? And this list doesn’t
show Christopher Henning, who is probably on like month two, who is the executive
director for Cal Dining. And of course, the list could go on in terms of other folks
that have joined us. But one of the most
important things that we do is hire people. And so, it’s important to
celebrate those searches. And we have a few important
searches underway. We have our chief operating officer, our chief financial officer, those are in the final
stages of those searches. I am working on consulting closely with the campus community on our associate vice chancellor and dean of students search, as well as a executive director for the HSUC student union search as well. You’ll hear more about those
items in the near future. I really am gonna end now, okay? So,
(audience laughs) just wanna bring you back
to these four pillars. Again, you’re gonna hear a
lot about these four pillars over the next year, I encourage you to do thinking, either individually or within your team, in terms of where you see
yourself fitting in here. And raise those issues. If you still have questions and concerns about what this actually means, please let us know so we
can answer those questions. So, thank you and we’ll
take questions now. (audience clapping) What are we doing to alleviate the basic needs issues for grad students? For example, increasing costs associated with health insurance. So, I know Bahar and Guy
are probably here somewhere and could give you a lot of information about how we’re addressing
the health care costs for grad students through
SHIP, through that program. Basic needs again is equally important for our undergraduates as
it is graduate students. We’ve had the opportunity to apply for some dollars made
available by the state through the office of the president. Those don’t just apply to undergraduates, they apply to graduate students as well. I know that when UHS
under Bahar’s leadership, when they were selecting the
new health care provider, they spent a lot of time consulting with a graduate assembly about what their specific needs would be related to student health insurance, so it’s something very
much that we’re mindful of. And we probably at some point in time, maybe at a round table, we could give a lot more
specific information about how we are in very exact ways addressing those health care costs, but it’s something we
are certainly mindful of. Is there a plan to add
additional dining facilities with all the new beds? Absolutely, one of the sites that you saw was the gateway site,
which is probably gonna be a donor-developed site, meaning somebody is going
to give us a residence hall. That’s gonna be announced sometime probably in the next few months as we’re working through
the details of that. And then the Oxford tract, we’re also gonna build there since that is on the west,
northwest side of campus, and most of the rest of the housing is on the south side of campus, we will definitely need
to have dining facilities. A lot of it depends on what we build in terms of is it apartment-style? Does it have a kitchen in the apartment? If it does, then can we
assume that most students will want to cook on their own rather than having a meal plan that they have to for pay ’em? If we build a new dining commons, in order to basically fund that
and cover the costs of that, we would pass the cost
of having a meal plan on to our students. So these are all things
that we’re trying to weigh. I think the answer, from my perspective, is to try to have as
varied options as possible for our student housing. I know one of the things
that we don’t have as much of is housing for upper-level
students and grad students, namely apartment-style housing. So, but, a dining commons
is definitely something we talk a great deal about when we have our housing conversations. Can I travel with the
professional development funds? Absolutely, you just have
to fill out the application, make a compelling case, send that to the committee, it will be reviewed by the committee. And then hopefully,
dollars being available, you’ll have funds to be able to travel to your professional conference. I would say one of the reasons
that this particular fund is really important to me personally is that I had a lot of
support early on in my career for engaging in professional development. And so, it’s really important for me that we make those opportunities available ’cause I know how impact being
able to go to a conference, do a presentation, or
sit on a national board, or what have you can have
in terms of one’s work on campus as well as just
developing a perspective on how you can be a better professional. – [Woman] This will be your last one. – Okay. Oh, this is a doozy. What accomplishment in the last year are you most proud of and why? Oh, well, by nature, I tend to be real forward-thinking person. You know, a day ends and I’m
looking towards the next day, I try not to dwell too much on maybe what didn’t happen today. I would say since I’ve been in this role for a little over a year, maybe just surviving the first year might be one of thing I’m most proud of. But I think there’s a lot of things that, to be proud of, I think probably the
biggest thing for me is that as I sit with my colleagues
and the chancellor, I always try to make
sure that I’m lifting up the needs of our students as
well as the needs of our staff. And I can think of numerous occasions when I have said to my colleagues, we need to consult students on that issue. We need to find out what they
think about our great ideas. And I can’t say that I
always get maybe what I want in terms of consultation, but I think very much the
chancellor and my colleagues are very much used to that advocacy and very much understanding of the fact that we need to be student-centered
in the work that we do. If I think of another good
one, I’ll let you know. Can Steve clarify what the
chief operating officer position is for? Yeah, so this used to be
associate vice chancellor for RSSP. As I look at the direction
that we’re going as a division, namely all those things that we listed as the things that are
happening on our campus and the things that are gonna
take a tremendous amount of expertise and investment
of behalf of our division, the idea of having a
chief operating officer, somebody who can look across the division in terms of helping us with
our strategic planning, somebody who can help us with our forward-thinking initiatives, somebody who can help us manage the very large operation of RSSP, but also then look at the
other auxiliaries that we have, help us identify ways to increase revenue. All those are things that I see the chief operating officer doing for us. Again, this is, and I feel very blessed to have a wonderful leadership team. I think the people that serve each of you in the roles as assistant vice chancellors or executive directors or other roles are top notch in terms of
the expertise that they bring and the passion that they
bring for their work. And so, I’m looking to add
somebody to– (alarm sounding) So, you had to set off an alarm to tell me it was time to end?
(audience laughing) So, didn’t this happen last year? Didn’t this thing go
off last year when we? Anyway, okay, so I think we’re very lucky to have such a great leadership team. And I see the chief operating officer bringing an additional set of skills, a perspective that
maybe we don’t currently have at the table to help us achieve our goals as a division. Okay, so, I think we are wrapping up now. I’ve got a couple of quick
announcements I wanna make. First of all, I just wanna give kudos to all the presenters, that was fabulous. (audience clapping)
Thank you so much. You know, I’ve done that
event Jeffrey a couple times and I still can’t figure out
how to get the steps down, but maybe the next time, that’ll happen. I wanna thank the ASUC events team for all their good work
in terms of this event. (audience clapping) The events and conferences
catering team of RSSP. (audience clapping) Tiffany Perales and her wonderful team. (audience cheering and clapping) Ellen Topp and her communications team for all their good work.
(audience clapping) And the members of the
VCSA meeting office, so Lauren and Gina for all that they did to help us with this event, thank you for your good work.
(audience clapping) Thank you so much for coming today, really appreciate it. Thank you.
(audience clapping)