Stanford Graduate School of Business Diploma Ceremony 2019

Stanford Graduate School of Business Diploma Ceremony 2019

October 9, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC] [MUSIC] [APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]>>Please be seated. Graduates, honored guests,
faculty, staff, families, and friends, welcome to the 2019
graduation ceremony at the Stanford University Graduate School
of Business.>>[APPLAUSE]>>I would like to begin by
recognizing the people around us who have played a pivotal role in
the experience of our graduates. The faculty that sit behind me have led
our students on a transformative journey. Could I ask the faculty to stand for
a moment of thanks?>>[APPLAUSE]>>Around the pavilion are staff
from the MBA, MSX, and PhD programs, whose dedication and effort
have helped make the journey meaningful. Could I ask our staff to stand and
be recognized?>>[APPLAUSE]>>We are joined by families and friends, who have provided support, advice, a
friendly ear, and most importantly, love. Let’s take a moment to recognize
our families and friends.>>[APPLAUSE]>>The Stanford Graduate School
of Business opened in 1925. It was the brainchild of Herbert Hoover,
a Stanford trustee, who was soon to become
President of the United States. Hoover was concerned that
talented young business people were leaving California for
the East Coast.>>[LAUGH]
>>He proposed that Stanford start a business school on
the West Coast, the American frontier. It would have a regional focus,
and blend teaching and research. He estimated that launching the new
venture would have a total cost of $50,000 a year.>>[LAUGH]
>>From those beginnings, a great deal has changed.>>[LAUGH]
>>If you look across this arena, you will see students from
across the country and across the world,
who speak more than 70 languages.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>We are today vastly more interconnected.>>Technology is vastly more advanced,
management continues to evolve. We have a broader notion of how
a business school can educate leaders for all types of organizations and careers. You, our graduates, reflect those changes. Yet, elements of Hoover’s vision remain. Stanford still sits on
the American frontier, the frontier of innovation and discovery. In coming to Stanford,
you have journeyed to that frontier. You have learned about what the future
might hold, the way new ideas and technologies will reshape our lives,
the way business and society will need to adapt. You’ve learned about the human aspects
of organizations and leadership. How to work with others,
how to build a culture. How to listen, communicate, inspire. As leaders of the future, you will have to be attentive
to both technology and people. You will need to think beyond yourselves, about the impact your
organizations have on the world. Leadership is about the people around you,
and the strategic choices and consequences of your decisions. Maintaining this breath of perspective,
the micro and the macro, will be essential in
realizing your collective potential. I am confident you are well-prepared. You have learned from
extraordinary faculty, you have made friends from around the world,
heard their stories and created new ones. You have developed a range of talents,
from my entrepreneurship, to investing, to public speaking,
to musical theater.>>[LAUGH]>>This afternoon, you walk across this stage and graduate,
but your GSB connections will continue, you will remain an important
part of the school. I would like to finish with a story
about those connections, and how they persist and unexpected,
but in meaningful ways. Some time ago, I was visiting China, is it
a hotel in Beijing with a few GSB alumni, talking to a group of Chinese reporters,
a fellow walks past, and seeing Stanford GSB on the door walks into
the room, it turns out he’s from Mexico. He’s in China for his wedding anniversary,
and he’s a GSB alum. Naturally, the reporters
immediately ask him about the GSB. I would met, I’m a little nervous. Haven’t met this fella before. He’s just wandered into
this hotel conference room. I’m wondering what he’s going to say about
the school that will show up the next day in the newspaper for
1.3 billion potential readers.>>[LAUGH]
>>So he tells a story about being a student at the GSB,
and having a beer with a classmate who’s decided to move to Seattle to
join a brand new computer company. The story unfolds. Turns out the classmate is Steve Ballmer,
the company is Microsoft. The story’s about technology and
human connection. The reporters are impressed, it just happened on these meetings thousands
of miles from home, says, actually, that’s not really the main point,
I graduated from Standford 35 years ago, I’ve worked in many organizations and
many industries. But the GSB taught me, was how to
change all of them for the better. I am impressed. Class of 2019, wherever you go,
may this place always be with you, and follow you in all your endeavors,
and be a home for you when you return. I’m excited to see what you accomplish
in your lives and in the world. I know you will make us proud. Congratulations, graduates.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Now, it is my great pleasure
to introduce Lord John Brown. Lord Brown grew up and
was educated in Great Britain. He joined British Petroleum while still in
University, and worked in exploration and production around the world. In 1981, he was a Sloan fella at the GSB.>>Whoo!>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Graduating with an MS in management. John returned to British Petroleum,
rising through the ranks, and maintaining his close connections with
the school through executive programs, and as a member of the GSB’s Advisory Council. In 1995,
John became chief executive of BP, and led the company through a golden decade
of expansion and diversification. In one of the defining moments of his
tenure, John returned to Stanford in 1997 and gave a landmark speech recognizing
the importance of climate change, and the need to address it. He was the first CEO of
a major oil company to do so. And he subsequently sought to rethink
BP’s future, Beyond Petroleum. John Stanford’s speech is credited with
helping to shift global politics and set the stage for
the passage of the Kyoto protocol in 1998. Since stepping down from BP, John has
been a member of the UK House of Lords, a government adviser, the president of
the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the author of several business books. These include Beyond Business, The Glass
Closet, about coming out as LGBT, and the importance of inclusive
corporate cultures. And most recently, Make, Think, Imagine,
Engineering the Future of Civilization. John has a remarkable perspective on
global business, on corporate culture, and on personal leadership. It has been my pleasure to get to
know him and learn from him, and I’m delighted to have him back at the GSB. Please join me in
welcoming Lord John Brown.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Dean Levin, and ladies and gentlemen, the year was 1969, and
I was contemplating my future. My father’s advice was very clear. Go and get a real job. He meant a job in industry. British Petroleum had sponsored
me as an undergraduate, and paid me to work there
during the vacations. But I was much more interested in
pursuing academic research, and in any case, industry was frowned upon inside the ancient walls of
the University of Cambridge. So I told my father, I do have a real job,
its called research. And with apologies to the members
of the faculty here today, my father replied, no, I mean a real job. So I relented, agreeing to join BP on
the condition that they sent me to the United States, and on the assumption
that I would only be there for a year or two before returning to Cambridge. As it turned out,
I found myself 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle working
in Point Barrow, Alaska. This was not quite what I had had in mind.>>[LAUGH]
>>But this didn’t stop me from staying at BP for
more than a year, indeed, for a career that would span
more than four decades. Fast forward to California in 1997. When I joined the board of
directors of intel corporation, the company CEO at that time
was the late great Andy Grove, who was one of my great mentors and
inspirations. Like me, he had Jewish relatives who’d
fled the horrors of mid century Europe. And like me, before he became
a businessman, he trained as an engineer. And he once told me that as an immigrant
who spoke terrible English, he chose to study engineering,
because he thought it was the only subject in which his examiners
would assess him fairly. In other words, Andy believed
engineering to be a rational subject. Will the bridge stay up or fall down? Does the computer program work,
or does it crash? With no room for value judgments, there
would be no room for prejudice or bias. But even with the best of intentions,
we build our human biases and flaws into the fabric of our creations. We forget that the technologies
we introduce into the world will have unpredictable effects
on the lives of real people. For example, opioid painkillers
can relieve suffering, but can also cause addiction. Hydrocarbons lift people out of poverty,
but their use this dangerous
the altering the Earth’s climate. And new levels of connectivity have
made it possible to communicate with anyone anywhere at any time,
but may have destroyed privacy. These innovations are all
products of engineering, but their impact on society Is determined
by the way in which they’re used. So Endigrove was only half right. Engineers can’t be assessed
through rationality alone, because everything they do
involves a value judgment and a choice about whether and
how to innovate. And in any case, I soon learned that no
engineering solution is complete unless it results in something practical that
humanity and the market wants. This naturally led me into business and
here to Stanford. I arrived here when almost every
business person was obsessed with shareholder value theory. This told us that the duty
of business leaders was to make as much money as possible for
their shareholders without going to jail. It reduced business to a mere process,
an object of rationality, and it contributed to the damaging
impression that companies are driven by self interest and indifferent
to the needs of those around them. But Stanford helped me understand
why that theory was incomplete. Guided by an incomparable faculty, I saw
that business could not be conducted in isolation from society,
public policy and human feelings. Business turned out to be a wonderful
weave of numbers and people. Like engineering, it was about
much more than mere rationality. So where does that leave
you as business leaders? It certainly makes your
job much more difficult. You cannot simply muddle through
by managing the status quo. Business is about much more, much more than administering
the advent of the inevitable. It’s about exercising judgment, and it’s about putting people in society at
the heart of every decision you make. These were my ambitions as a CEO. There were moments when I succeeded and
moments when I failed. And I want to share two of
those moments just now. The first took place here at Stanford. On a scorching May morning in 1997,
I delivered a speech in the frost amphitheater in which
I became the first big oil CEO to acknowledge the link between anthropogenic
carbon emissions and climate change. I announced our decision to go beyond
analysis to seek solutions and to take action. We committed to invest in the development
of alternative fuels and energies, and we pledged to advocate and advance big
global solutions, such as a carbon tax. That speech opened BP up to attack
from absolutely every direction. Environmental lobby groups
thought we’d not gone far enough, while the American Petroleum Institute
said that BP had left the church. But within a decade, the oil and gas industry had stopped denying
climate change and BP had led the way. This strategic shift was the product
of almost a decade of listening, debate, and persuasion. We spoke to President Clinton,
Governor George W Bush, NGOs such as the Pugh Center and the
world’s leading scientists and experts. One of my closest confidants was
Mike Spence, then dean of this school, who provided the most
valuable sounding board. And we spoke to BP employees too,
who of course, were also consumers, voters, and parents concerned
about their family’s future. By taking a lead on climate change, we
changed the way people thought about BP. We attracted a new group of leaders
who would never have considered a career in the energy industry. And we created the foundation
of a successful, renewable and alternative energy business. We focused on developing relevent
solutions to new challenges. We put people, society,
and the environment, as well as shareholder value
at the heart of our business. Two decades later,
I regret that there is still much to do. The probability of an existential
threat to humanity is rising. Renewable energy is supplying a growing
share of global energy demand, but it will not replace fossil fuels,
certainly not in my lifetime, and possibly not even in yours. This means that we must use
technologies such as carbon capture and storage, to take the carbon
out of hydrocarbons. We know how to do this. We have all the technologies we need. It’s now a question of getting the right
polices, the right behaviors, and the right incentives so that solutions
can be deployed globally at scale and ever decreasing costs. Above all, it’s a question of harnessing
the power of business to deliver what is good for society. So BP’s experience with
climate change was, I believe, an example of successfully
changing direction. We leaned in to a great upheaval
in science, engineering, and behavior which is still taking place. But in my personal life,
in one very important area, I failed to keep up with
the pace of change. My mother, an Auschwitz survivor,
gave me two pieces of advice. The first was that when the going
gets tough, the majority always hurt the minority, so it’s better not to be
an identifiable member of a minority. The second was not to
tell anyone your secrets because they will surely
use them against you. This advice was born from
our own painful experience. Applied to my own life, it meant that
I chose to keep my sexuality a secret. It was easy at first. I had two lives,
a private life and a work life. It was exciting, a bit like being
James Bond with a legend and a reality. In some respects, this painful
separation taught me something. I was good at reading people and
sensing danger. But as I rose up in the ranks of BP,
I became more recognizable, and this behavior became riskier. I was enmeshed in conservative
corporate and political cultures and was worried that any disclosure
would damage business relationships. So my work became my life and
BP became my extended family. When my mother died, I lost my
closest companion, became very lonely. I foolishly thought that rather
than openly seeking a partner, it would be safer to
find one secretly online. That was my first mistake. And it was followed by several
further serious areas of judgment. In 2007,
I was outed by a British newspaper. And then I decided to resign from BP. As CEO, one of my primary responsibilities
was to lead through inclusion. That means creating teams in which
everyone has a stake in the future. It also means instilling
self-belief in people and demonstrating to them that they can
be included while being themselves. The ways in which our workforce
changed while I was CEO suggested that we were
doing something right. But the practice of inclusion is so
much easier when you have role models who demonstrate that it’s possible
to succeed while being yourself. By remaining in the closet,
I failed to be a role model. When it came to a personal and
authentic leadership, the world around me had changed and
I had not recognized that change. These big experiences
demonstrate two things. The first is that we
don’t have to be passive when faced with a world which
makes us feel lost and powerless. There are things we can change,
even if it takes time. On climate change, public debate has
shifted dramatically in the past 20 years. It shifted because people
said what they believed and worked hard to convince others. I’m proud of being part of that process,
and I only wish it had moved more quickly. Attitudes to being gay have changed too,
because people stood up and had pride in themselves and
in who they are. I regret not being one
of those people sooner. My second conclusion is that
being different is a strength. Business, and indeed any other walk
of life, is not populated by robots, programmed to think and
act in a standardized way. A successful business is a company, a group of different people
with different experiences and skills led in an inclusive way who
come together for a common purpose. Difference is what the world expects
of every Stanford GSB graduate. It expects you to challenge
norms rather than to obey them. It expects you to be yourselves and
to shape and reshape the world rather than
to conform to its expectations. It expects you to think deeply,
act boldly, dream widely, for these are the qualities of great
leaders and great organizations. Ladies and gentlemen on behalf of all
GSP alumni, I congratulate you and wish you a wonderful day of celebration. Thank you very much.>>[APPLAUSE]>>It is now my great honor and pleasure to introduce
the GSB PhD class of 2019.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Our PhD program is small and exclusive, with an admission rate well under 10%. These individuals came here as students, dedicating themselves to two or
three years of coursework followed by an intensive research
apprenticeship in their chosen fields. Having become true experts,
they leave us as colleagues, setting out on a path to
create new knowledge, which we know will help change the world
of business and management for the better. Today, we formally celebrate
the transition of these folks, from students to future intellectual
leaders who will play an important role in shaping our understanding
of business and management. After their advisors place the hood of the
Stanford Graduate School of Business on them, they will join us on the stage as we welcome them as
colleagues into our profession. Diane Lee,
executive director of the PhD program, will now read their names and
their dissertation advisor will hood them.>>Yabuz.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yabuz studies the influence of emotions
on consumer behavior. Ann Huei.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Huei’s research focuses on over the counter
financial markets, specifically how dealers trade bonds
with customers and with other dealers. Nathan Atkinson.>>[APPLAUSE].>>Nate studies how legal rules can be
designed to better align the interests of corporations and society. Melanie Brooks.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Melanie’s research focuses on how to structure idea generation
activities to maximize innovation. Thomas Choate.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Thomas’s research models the emergence of ambiguities in
the text of laws enacted by legislatures. Robert Donnelly
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rob’s research provides improved models on learning how consumers make choices
when faced with a large number of options. Christian Fong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christian’s research focuses on congressional
leadership and rules. Lee Cha Tsey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cha Tsey’s research focuses on how investors allocate their attention and how
that impacts the functioning of markets.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Li Nguyen Hao.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nguyen Hao’s research explores how quantitative easing
policies by the Federal Reserve affects the US banking system and
the broader economy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lee Chow.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chow studies American politics with
a focus on campaign finance.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Georgio Martini.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Giorgio studies how to design markets where information and preferences, rather
than money, determines who gets what.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joshua Morris.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Josh examines how the pain associated with parting
with money affects a person’s spending, budgeting and investing decisions.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Roy Roth.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Roy’s research identifies imperfections in the market for
venture capital financing. Such as excessive optimism and
misaligned incentives, and explores the effects these
have on funding patterns.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shen Ren Nguyen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ren Nguyen’s research focuses on engagement drivers in
a lending marketplace.>>[LAUGH] [APPLAUSE]>>Ryan Shu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ryan’s research explores how corporate decision making and public finance policy
affect household labor market outcomes.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dao Young Yun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dao Young studies how to optimally
schedule medical appointments. And designed treatment policy to
significantly reduce patient’s worst case life years. Jessica Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jessica studies consumer behavior in online markets, and
it’s implications for platform design.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Good afternoon on this festive and beautiful day. It is my real pleasure as the Director
of the Stanford MSX program to present this year’s graduates
who will receive the degree of Master of Science and Management. The mission of the MXS program is
to provide experienced leaders. Men and women who have spent at least
eight years in professional and management roles. The opportunity to prepare themselves for increasingly senior positions
in organizations they will lead. The program is a full-time year
long course of academic study. Giving these students an all too
rare chance for reflection and growth in the midst of
an already accomplished career. On behalf of the administration
of the program, and the faculty who’ve taught them. Join me in wishing each of
them great fulfillment and success in the next
phase of their careers.>>[APPLAUSE]>>In honor of the service of former GSB Dean, Robert Joss,
who is himself a Stanford Sloan fellow. The top 10% of the MSX class ranked by
academic performance are designated as Robert Joss scholars. As we read the names of the graduates, we
will also announce that they have achieved the distinction of Robert Joss scholar. I will now read the graduates’ names
while Dean Levin presents the diplomas. Asett Abdul Alif.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anush Argiwhol.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Karun Anand.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jason Honway Bay, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rohit Bala, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nick Blassi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jack Sai.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adriel Cha.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarub Chirimar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Chong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Phillippe Corcimi Mota.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amir Damerjee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Phillippe Damussey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dwan Chaley.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Judy Dunbar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sarah June Erickson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Humberto Escopini.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Motash Bachri.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Fabian Galvo Garcis.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Wen Gong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Megan Elizabeth Gerring, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shri Ghandi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Miguel Gravit.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Monishika Gupta.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hamid Hadibake.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Samantha Hagerbomber, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yu Hiriyama.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Henry Shang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jeremy James Joseph. [APPLAUSE]
>>Carlos Roberto Hobel Mujia.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mike Kerns.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Max Kendrick.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>June San John Kim.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Robert Mower.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Man Sing Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Phil Lui.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lui Lui.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Zhihal Lin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hui Meng Lu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ching Lu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lo Ting.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jay Ma.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Panos Monomapolus Marious.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Da Spri Zing Mon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Niyoko Marioma.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Knowles McMilan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maya Misrah.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Aki Miasaka.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthew Napily.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ann Nyugen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Abir Nashma.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Victor Osemits.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jun Yung Park.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jiee Kai Pua.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Qua Quorte.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Israel Rena.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Diego Sarreiva.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Usuke Sasejima.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Damona Shebata.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kyen Kenny Shintani.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sumik Zena.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Neil Spackman>>[APPLAUSE]>>Oriana Scravle.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Pi Ann Ton, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Taylor.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tiffany Jane Chen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eric Michael Druciwicz, Robert Joss scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Frank Whipper, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brett Wilson, Robert Joss Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Thomas Wilson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Karen Wu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sander Wushei.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lamia Usef.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hi Hi Nguyen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bowen Zhang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joey Zo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jackie Jue.>>[APPLAUSE]>>It is now my pleasure to introduce
senior associate dean, Josie Fynburg.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Among the Robert L Joss scholars, one student’s academic achievement
places them at the top of the MSx class. This student is awarded
The George GC Parker prize named in honor of GSB faculty and
former Program Director, Professor George Parker,
who is here today. The graduate receives a certificate,
a cash award and their name will be on a plaque
displayed at the GSB.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>The recipient of the 2019 George Parker
prize is Brett Wilson.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Distinguished guests, faculty members, staff, families and friends,
the MBA students gathered before us today have engaged in
that transformation of experience. They’ve acquired solid foundations
in general management. And have pursued deeper study
in their areas of interest. They have engaged in personal growth and built relationships that
will last a life time. They have helped the school and
the community in many ways. They are an impressive group and
are ready and worthy to join the ranks
of our illustrious alumni. Therefore It is my great honor and privilege to present to you
the Stanford MBA Class of 2019.>>[APPLAUSE]>>As you leave, I hope your memories of the GSB will remain fresh, and that you
will stay involved with the school. Our alumni played an important
role in your academic experience. Ranging from serving as judges
in executive challenge, to acting as mentors in
entrepreneurial classes. It is my wish that you, too, will engage
with the GSB’s academic mission as alumni. And give your time and
experience generously to future classes. Your class has already demonstrated its
desire to stay connected to the GSB, and to support the school
in a meaningful way through your participation
in the class gift campaign. You will leave your own legacy and
play a part in bringing the GSB experience to future generations,
as other alumni have done before you. All of you have undoubtedly
heard of Arjay Miller. Arjay served in the US Air Force
during the Second World War, and was later one of the so-called whiz kids,
who revolutionized Ford Motor Company. Arjay became president of Ford,
and then, later, the much admired fourth dean of the GSB. In honor of Dean Miller’s service, the top 10% of the class ranked
by academic performance, are designated as Arjay Miller scholars. As we hear the names of the graduates,
we will also announce that they have achieved academic
distinction of Arjay Miller scholar. In case, like every policy in the GSB,
there’s qualifications, right, in case of joint degree students
who are currently working, but are yet to graduate, we will identify those who
are currently the top 10% of the class. The late Dean Miller has also
founded the Certificate in Public Management and
Social Innovation Program at the GSB. The certificate program educates leaders to understand social issues, design for and evaluate impact and
understand the specificities of the management of social organizations,
in both private and public sectors. Today, certificate graduates take
the spirit of our GSB model, change lives, change organizations,
change the world to its full potential. This year, we have 109 recipients. Their names are listed in
the commencement program. Graduate names will now be
read by Margaret Hayes, Assistant Dean of the MBA and
MSx programs. And by Kirsten Moss, Assistant Dean of
the MBA admissions and financial aid. Graduates will receive their
diplomas from Dean Levin. Margaret and Kristen, please. [BLANK AUDIO]
>>Kate Abercrombie.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jessica Monisola Adipojum.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthew James Admin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Apor Agrowal, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alejandro Aguirre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Marco Alban Hidalgo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Callud Aldobal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jane Elizabeth Alexander.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Justin Amaral Amisquita.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gavort Amergingon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicole Appleton.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kristin Archer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julio Arman Arias Casico.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ruben Wong Arnold.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benton Attchinson.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Julia Rasandy Avarback.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gabriel Benjamin Avans.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Morgan Bare.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Robert Bailey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tura Bajua.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Annie Baldwin, top 10% of the current class.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Blair Jansen Ballard.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Deepak Bonsal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Prachi Banthia.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Stephen Donahue Barber.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mohammed Rakeshlee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kate Bartlett.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hillary Susan Bartlett.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Steven Bay.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jamie Bitten, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ryan Scott Bock.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adhoopchesh Balooker.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yasmin Belo Osake.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mercedes Bent.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Marissa Ann Bertarelli.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Steven Beringer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eric Davis Bloomenhirst. France.
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Leanne.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Emily Boothe, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE] Pierre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anthony Brasso Andiya.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maya Breccias.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mark Brenson>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Eleanor Buckingham.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mary Buckland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicole Vasisnki Bias Ajilmila Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Geoffrey Powder Ajilmila Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Ethani Kadiso>>[APPLAUSE]>>Michael Andrew Karen>>[APPLAUSE]>>Christopher Thomas Cooper>>[APPLAUSE]>>Mauricio Carvajal>>[APPLAUSE]>>Eliah Cheng.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Charnoff.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Malcolm Piles Chaliah.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jacqueline Chen>>[APPLAUSE]>>Chin Chen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chen>>[APPLAUSE].>>Sophia Chen
>>[APPLAUSE]>>Alena Chen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lynn Chang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Grace Chang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Stacy Christiansen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Chung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Cinnamon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Caroline Clark.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Clark.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Samuel William Clayman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Andrew Cohen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kate Cooper.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Calway Costa.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Conrad Carl Joseph Cutino.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Thomas Crew, RJ Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE].>>Hayley Chase Crown.>>[APPLAUSE].>>Daniela Cuneo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ainsley Ndego>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rose Tolwen>>[APPLAUSE]>>Robert Davis>>[APPLAUSE]>>Partrick Deplay Carragher.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sean De Vela.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chin Chin Dy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chiro Dimano.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sean Paul Breaker-Dillard.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sheriff Neimer Deicy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amanda Donahue Hanson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Natalie Burgess Doyle.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benjamin Ross Dre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthew Dugan>>[APPLAUSE]>>Samuel>>[APPLAUSE]>>Samantha>>[APPLAUSE]>>Charlotte Ederson>>[APPLAUSE]>>Alexandra Edmonds>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sarah Egosi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Eisler.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Demah Elmashnuk.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Parker Ence.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Maria English.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rosario Aresuas Vegara.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>John Tyler>>[APPLAUSE]>>Cody Evans>>[APPLAUSE]>>[APPLAUSE]>>Kenneth Quin Fong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James McGinnuess Farber.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Erica Feldhausen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Josh Feldman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sam Fisher.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Edward Benjamin Fishman, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Fishman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Justin>>[APPLAUSE]>>Riya Forbes.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrea Fox>>[APPLAUSE]>>Dan Freeman>>[APPLAUSE]>>Robert Walker Forlan>>[APPLAUSE]>>Tomas Garcia Esquardo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mehet Siman Guard. [APPLAUSE]
>>Joseph Gargliano.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joan English Gaus.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brea.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Jone Gescamine.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Caroline Kizzy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Allam Gladdy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Noga Golan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jennifer Goldman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sarah Michelle Goodyson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Massimiliano Gorry.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christopher Grant.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Iyke Greenstein.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jake Evan Greenstein, RJ Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christina Susan Globo.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nicholas PM.>>Hanukkah Gupta.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joseph Daniel Gutierrez.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Daniela Lansky.>>Rodolfo Gosman.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Fernando Gosman Elirado.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jays Hasder.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mahul Michael Hajar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Emma Francis Henry.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jennifer Lee Harris.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Meredith Kolten Posse.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Trent Posse, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eda Bell Hemple.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Talia Helena Hernandez Durant.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dionisio Herrera.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Namukuna Pachillo>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sarah Hoffman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Doug Holland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Edward Holt the second.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Charles White>>[APPLAUSE]>>Chow Poit.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Catherine Yellin Wang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicholas Lyle Hubbard>>[APPLAUSE]>>Evette Houston>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ahmed Ibrahim>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nelson Eigenkla.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jeremy Nikodemas Intal.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Moe Islam.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lauren Nicole Jackson.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Abhay Jane>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ayush Jaime>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sadiya James.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nicholas Andrew Jankosky, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julia Jescoska.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alejandro Paso.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jonathan John Pierre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matthew Jensen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dicasion J.N Kamara>>[APPLAUSE]>>Parkie Chong>>[APPLAUSE]>>Larsen Jones>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sam Jones.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Raymond Jake>>[APPLAUSE]>>Louis Conrad John>>[APPLAUSE]>>Hadulia Hoshitaka.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Abijet Samir Paji.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Roland Kalta, RJ Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nanjidya Singh Kandola>>[APPLAUSE]>>Katrina Ann>>[APPLAUSE]>>Blake Kavanaugh.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kendra Koeler>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ian Patrick Nichols Kelly.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Benjamin Royce Kemper.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Philippe Ketlun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alicia Kayes>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sophia Selma Khalifa Shrampo>>[APPLAUSE]>>Janjan Kim [APPLAUSE]>>Nicole Kim.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Charles Kitsinger.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Katrina Farron Kline.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jake Peneller.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jeffrey Tucker Coacher, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anna Conan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Aris Constant Tinids.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joshua Cornberg.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brian Richard Crump.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Matias Lanus.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Haimay Laran.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Luis Lascurain.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Raffaele Lachey, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Lewis, Arjay Miller scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ben Len.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hellen Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Timbo Lee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Ginger Leow.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Amy Liflan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Helen Lin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Qu Lin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ellen Lu, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Max Liu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mimi Yuinshi Liao.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Liara Lockhart.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Francisco Lopes.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mara Latman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Scott Robert Lowenstein.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Tawanda Michael Maheiri.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mehein Mahutra.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Bob Manfrieda, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tess Manning.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Swathi Mannorobbie.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Sarah Ann Katherine Phillips Martin.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Andrew Benjamin Matonga Tietse.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Armin Matous.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bridget Miene.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Evan Miene.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Pameta Mensa.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Will Miller.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julie Mince.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Nero Yopus.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Josh Matrone.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shian Yogish Modi, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chad Monroe.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kelly Murphy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Austin Myrtland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ren Nelly Masalam. [APPLAUSE]
>>Jen Nakamura.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anura Nallapapi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Zannah Nanisha.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Gabriela Netter.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Niet Newman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jennifer Nigh.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hu Nuegyn.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shultun Ne.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julian Mex.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sinith Kupana Mihendra Nishar, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Justin Gregory Nordin.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nate Bas Nunta.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Nancy Crystal Acasia Nudura.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Johanna Elaine.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tias Olivada.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrea Olmos Nakamura.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Efay Omilaway.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juliana Jasmine Ortega.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Henry Oseski Techna.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David O’Sandy.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julia Isabelle Osterman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Casey Hughes Oswald.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Elizabeth Pan.>>[APPLAUSE]
[APPLAUSE]>>Luke Patton.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jessica Renee Patton.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Devon Penns.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Payne, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Danielle Penzack.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>William Edward Perocci.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Simone Gabrielle Perine.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ana Pino Mediana.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yada Pia Yang Quan.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kevin Manwell Powler.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Joanne Pun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Piyoush Puteek.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ben Pojek.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Sydney Pringnets.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Trevor Slocum Profit.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alexander Robert Prudent.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lauren Christine Prizant.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Veronica Pouvine.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Simon Shen, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>June Qu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Will Quinn McMahon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Allyson Wieceski.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Carolina Regolta.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Evan Raman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nytha Visram Ranji.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Veneath Ranjon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Vadrigal Ramos.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ajetia Ranjon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Lunar Jishin Rao.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Phillip Rathmore Jr., Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Courtney Linn Ready.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Havier Ridondo Alistaway, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Charles Rice.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dane Rena.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michelle Rentaft.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Emmershin Ray, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sam Murray.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Will Alexander Ritter.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kathryn Maria Rivera.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Patrick Robinson, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Victoria Rogers.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Shawn Rosenberg.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Betty Alana Rosenfield.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jacklin Claire Rotman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Rucazzi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anne Catherin Rutherford.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Joseph Ryan, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Camille Amin Mohamed Sayeed.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Serbi Songkhla.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Elmer Santus.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adriel Saporta.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Camila K Saberhashi.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Christopher Carl Sheer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daniel Schiller.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mark Chifsky.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Patrick Thomas Schnetler.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sean Arthur Shroeder.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Schwartz, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Mitchell Scott.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brian Scullen.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Taylor Siva.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Pareen Veejay Sha.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Melana Pascal Shapira.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sam Shapiro, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Divianka Sherma.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Noah Matthew Sheinbaum.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Valerie Shen, top 10% of current class.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Dennis Shiraev.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tas Merzhain.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Tonya Sophia Sesca Segie.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Tyler Johnston Paulie Smith.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Samantha Smith Eppsteiner.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Helen Hosanna Solomon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Michael Joseph Solomon.>>[APPLAUSE] Alice Song,
Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juyan Sung.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Etska Sunmas.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Patrick Steffer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yelen Stern.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jacob Stern.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tanner Strickland.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Federico Sucre.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anderson Simarly.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ethan Tsun.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rachel Lauren Susman.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jan Lae Takasi.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Rio Tanne, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bragiel Terry Gopala.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Alana Teitelbaum.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Peter Tripolock.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hannah Shinyue Tien.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Noris Yedong Tee.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hero Tien.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Rodica Timoten.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Katherine Sidney Topper.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Erick Trap.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Brian Prescott Triana.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Salo Francalino Tristo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Vinae Triveti.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Karen Underwood.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ray Hannah Bakili.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tucker Petrone Beneqen, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Helen Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Juan David Vargas Lopez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sebastian Valez.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Agneta Venpekramon.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Adam Marcus Behasalt.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Derek Walker, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Cam Walters.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>April Bowen Wong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Chris Wong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Nai Chang Wong Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Benjamin Ward.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew James Wardle.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>James Wang>>[APPLAUSE]>>Kate Owens Warton.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Kevin Thomas White, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Williams.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tyler Willebrand.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>David Winer.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Aaron David Windgab.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Allison Wisneski.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Daisy Wolf.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ashley Woodreth.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Graham Wookey.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Boshen Wu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Owen Wurzbacher, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sonya Yada.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Sahill Yakeme.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Katie Yang.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Yeakshmi Chatra Yalagada.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Andrew Wi Lung Yeo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Tay Jun Yoon, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Bruno Yoshimura.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Carrie Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Guth Roslin Yo.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Jim Yu.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ian Zalas.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Pablo Zapata Adaranburu Zapala.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Anna Zayakina.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Eric Zong, Arjay Miller Scholar.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Julianne JZ Zong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Zee Y Jouel.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ray Zong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Stef Yuchen Zong.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Leroy Asher Cicrone.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Hilary Rosenjack Zimmick.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>Ariel Ziv.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Nominated and chosen by their peers. The recipient of
the Ernest C Arbuckle Award is the second year MBA student who by
their active participation, initiative, leadership,
and personal integrity is judged as having contributed
most to the fulfillment of the goals of
the Stanford Graduate School of Business. In their actions,
both within school and in society. The recipient receives a cash prize and also has their name on a plaque
on display at the GSB. We are delighted to have Susan Arbuckle, the daughter of Ernie Arbuckle with
us today to deliver the award. This year,
recipient of the award Is Julian>>[APPLAUSE]>>The Alexander A Robichek Student Achievement Award in Finance
was established to honor Professor Robichek ‘s outstanding
contribution to the teaching of finance of the GSB from
1960 until his death in 1978. The award is given to an MBA students
selected by the finance faculty for outstanding achievements
in the finance courses. The recipients receives the award and
also has their name on a plaque for display at the GSB. And we are delighted that Mark Robichek, Professor Robichek’s son is here
today to deliver the award. This year the recipient of the award,
is Owen Woodbacher.>>[APPLAUSE] [APPLAUSE]>>Among the RJ Miller scholars, one student’s academic achievement
places them at the top of the class. This student is designated as
the Henry Ford II Scholar and receives, along with the Miller Scholar
scroll, a significant cash award.>>[LAUGH]
>>And their name on a plaque
displayed at the GSB.>>[LAUGH]
>>It is a musical, isn’t it?>>[LAUGH]
>>This year’s recipient of the award Is Jeffrey Tucker.>>[APPLAUSE]>>Honored guests, faculty staff, families, and friends we have reached
the conclusion of our ceremony.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>I invite you to join us for receptions at the Knight Management Center
as soon as the ceremony ends. Which is now.>>[LAUGH]>>Graduates, please stand.>>[APPLAUSE]>>What a journey it has been. Before we walk out one last time in
the California sun and celebrate, let’s have one more round of applause
to recognize the GSB class of 2019.>>[APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]