Southern Oregon University Economics Degree Programs

Southern Oregon University Economics Degree Programs

October 22, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[inaudible] Ashland’s in a really unique
position. And SOU being in Ashland, it allows us to attract
really amazing faculty, for a school this size.
And so for Ashland, and SOU, our economics
faculty are dynamite. We have some real strengths
in heterodox economics, which may not mean anything to everybody. But what that means is within our
niche of economics and our research, our faculty are some of
the best in the country. So we have so many areas in economic
where a student can study ranging from microeconomic, macro economics, financial
economics, economic development, gender economics, all kinds of things that students can
learn here and then actually be able to apply the skill and knowledge
they learn to the real world. I love that there’s no more
than 20,25 students in a class. Most of mine are around
15 and 16 this quarter. It just gives you a very
personal experience with
your teachers and it lets you ask questions and not be scared of
anyone judging you or feeling inadequate. Economics at SOU is different than other
institutions because we do take this broader approach to the discipline. So you won’t just study
mainstream theories of economics, but we’ll also talk about the social
and historical context in which these economic theories manifest themselves. Because I came from a
sociology background, I was really intrigued by the perspective
that the Southern Oregon University economics program has as an
emphasis on heterdoxical economics. It has an emphasis on the intriguing
aspects of economics outside of pure finance. The crossover
between the sociology, anthropology and economic spheres
is something that appealed to me. One of the things that I think
is a real value to our students, in economics is they have real
opportunities to do research with faculty. Currently I have two students
doing research projects, throughout the summer, but
also through the school year. So a lot of our students will turn that
into their capstone research projects, and others will use that, just to build their resumes and their
CVs for their job opportunities in the future. I chose economics because it deals
with real world problems that affect everybody. And it gives you, it gives you a lens to critically think
about issues and how to solve them that other degrees might not give you. You’re
able to work closely with professors. Like currently myself and professor
Anderson are working on a research project for the crime in the Rogue Valley
with the Sheriff’s department. And it’s really cool to be able to, to look at problems that are actually
where you’re at and you can see the issues firsthand and how to solve
them and actually help solve
issues that are in your community.