Some Real Concerns About Deepfakes – SOME MORE NEWS

Some Real Concerns About Deepfakes – SOME MORE NEWS

October 16, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


(dramatic music) (papers rustling) – Where’s Romeo’s semen? Is an anagram for here’s Some More News. That news being that
they’re remaking “Face/Off” for some reason, and, like, I dunno, I guess I’d be up for it as
long as Ben is also interested. I certainly wouldn’t
forcibly take his face, is my point here. That would be rude, but also, this is a thing that
is happening now, to faces. – [Interviewer] Um, so
you’re a huge Bravo fan? – Oh yes. – [Interviewer] Who was your favorite and least favorite
housewife, of all cities? (laughing) – Um, my favorite is
probably Lisa Vanderpump. – Why? Why? Why must this be our future? In case you’re brand new,
the video you just watched, and possibly had a sexual awakening to, is called a “deepfake”. Simply put, a deepfake is
that scene in Forrest Gump where they meticulously
reanimated JKF’s face to interact with Tom Hanks, only in a terrifyingly accessible program available to literally anyone. It’s the push-of-a-button technology that ’90s movies about hacking and espionage pretended that
video manipulation was like. So, now that the future is today, what do we do with such a
powerful new visual trickery? Digitally graft our faces
onto Leonardo DiCaprio? Yeah! That’s what we do. Also, non-consensual porn. Fast, easy (beep)fodder
for the rubber of one out on the go. Because obviously, since you know, that’s literally how
we evolved every single new technology out there. Can’t crank out a hearty cum to it? No thank you and goodbye forever. It’s a deviation from
the point of this video, but I’m not even kidding here. The invention of the printing press almost immediately led
to erotic engravings, and we’ve been consistently exceeding that pervert yardstick ever since. Also, you never want to
touch the pervert yardstick. It’s exactly as disgusting as you think. What were we talking about? Deepfakes, a concept so
new that it had an annoying red line under it in the
script for this video. The surface level problem with
this is immediately evident, as deepfakes allow weirdos
to slap any celebrity’s face onto porn, or a normal person
they hate’s face onto porn. Combine this with VR
and we’re but years away from making passionate love
to Amelia Earhart like we, as a society, always wanted to, and of course there’s
the political aspect. A world of sophisticated smear campaigns that put fake words in the
mouths of public figures, or easily dupe people with
deepfake scams as explained here. – But how we move forward
in the age of information is gonna be the difference
between whether we survive or whether we become some
kind of (beep) up dystopia. – Thanks Obama? Anyhoo, those are the
most obvious two threats you’ve, no doubt, heard about. Porn of people who do
not want to be in porn, and political propaganda, and as of right now, you’re most likely on the
fence about whether deepfakes are a dystopian harbinger
or just another media scare. The answer is less about
the technology itself, or even the implications
of the technology, and more about how we
choose to react to it. After all, deepfakes exist now. There’s no going back. They’re not hypothetical
and preventable like, like a “Face/Off” remake no one asked for. (dramatic music) So the first question
is, are deepfakes legal? The short answer is, mostly
yes, depressingly so. In terms of the criminalization
of non-consensual porn, AKA revenge porn, deepfakes don’t apply because they technically
aren’t nude images of the person in question, but rather images doctored
to make them look nude. It means that in order
to take a deepfake down from a website, you either
have to shame that website or file a false light or defamation claim, which puts the burden
of proof on the victim and possibly creates a long
and expensive legal adventure. Ironically, the people with
the power to remove a deepfake are the ones whose face
isn’t in the video, as the pornography itself could be flagged for copyright violations, assuming the copyright holder even cares, and that’s pretty much it for the moment, and that sucks a lot and
it needs to be fixed, but also it needs to be fixed correctly, and this is where we get
into a difficult discussion because even though deepfakes
seem like the beginning of an inevitable dystopia,
our reaction to deepfakes, as well as our attempts to regulate them, might actually be worse
if we’re not careful because we’re talking
about a problem that A, brushes very close to the First Amendment, and B, is currently being fast-tracked by multiple terrible
proposals in Congress. You know, the place that
is filled with very smart people that Americans all super love. Two that come to mind are the “Malicious Deep Fake
Prohibition Act of 2018” and the slightly less jazzy “Defending Each and Every
Person from False Appearances “by Keeping Exploitation Subject to “Accountability Act of 2019”. You can argue that both
of these proposed bills have their heart in the right place, except neither one of
them introduce anything besides harsher punishments mixed with extremely broad definitions
of what deepfakes are. The big idea in the latter act being mandatory watermarks on deepfakes. Something that totally solves that problem of online porn harassment
and political propaganda, but it can get even worse
than simply being broad and ineffective, such
as last year’s proposed New York State Assembly Bill A08155, which, to quote, “provides
that an individual’s “persona is the personal
property of the individual “and is freely transferable
and descendible” and “that use of a digital
replica for purposes “of trade within an expressive
work shall be a violation.” Because while that would
certainly make deepfakes illegal, it would also technically
make every biopic and documentary illegal
unless specifically approved by the holder of the copyright, and by copyright I mean
the existence of a person. This might have something to
do with why every film studio came out against the bill, and while you might think,
“Big deal, they can’t make “The Imitation Game 2: Turing’s Revenge”. The idea that an individual’s
persona is a freely transferable property also
means that studios could essentially own the image
of a person if that person stupidly signed their image over in a moment of financial weakness. In other words, it’s the
exact dystopia that these laws are supposedly trying to prevent. So yeah, is (beep)ing tricky man! As of right now, we have
the technology needed to successfully detect a deepfake. So considering that they
aren’t completely convincing just yet, figuring out
the exact law to stop them feels more important than
finding an immediate solution. Especially when the root of the problem might not even be deepfakes themselves and deepfake detection is kinda just another distraction from that. What does this rambunctious
news god mean by that? Will we ever crack the enigma of my words? Who do we talk to about putting me in a remake of “Face/Off”? Two of those three questions
will be answered right now. While the primarily dark
implications of deepfakes do involve the concepts of
porn and misinformation, they actually have little
to do with celebrities or politicians, and more
to do with social media and the way we consume facts. What I mean is, the sad
truth is that we don’t need deepfakes to be completely
convinced by blatant lies. You know, as evidenced by just
turning your head slightly and looking around at the world. After all, the most effective
video propaganda of late isn’t a deepfake, but rather this doctored
speech of Nancy Pelosi, edited to make her seem drunk. – And then he had a press
conference in the Rose Garden with all this um, short, sort of visuals– – [Cody] Now the doctored video, in which she appears to be impaired. – And then he had a press
conference in the Rose Garden with all this um, short, sort of visuals. – That was shared and watched thousands, if not millions of times on
both Facebook and Twitter, and another doctored
version was of course shared by our totally not-incoherent president who certainly isn’t projecting
his own mental erosion on others. Neither was done using deepfakes, the latter of which
actually being a deceptively edited Fox Business segment, clearly designed to
hate-orgasm tired brains of the most racist and aged viewers, once again shared by our
president and his tippy-top brain. My point is, even though
there’s clear video evidence that this speech was doctored, it didn’t stop Trump’s most
feverish fans from sharing it. After all, there is an entire
subsection of supporters who believe he was sent from
God to dissolve a secret cabal of satanic pedophiles, based on a series of
anonymous 4Chan posts. In a country where our
highest of leaders are sharing fake grandpa memes on social media, we don’t really need
deepfakes to trick people into believing propaganda. In fact, the biggest threat of deepfakes aren’t the videos themselves, but more likely the
introduction of the concept as one more tool for the
lexicon of dumb people justifying their (beep) beliefs. There’s already a giant
post in The_Donald subreddit about how Killery and her death
squad of satanic Hollywood elites secretly invented
deepfakes as an excuse for future video evidence of their guilt. While no doubt, future
undoctored videos of Trump tripping over words or
accidentally supporting genocide or, like, getting his dick
stuck in Air Force One, whatever nightmare comes next, they will be written off by
his supporters as deepfakes. “Deepfake!” they will
howl from their foul guts, pointing an accusatory
digit at whatever supreme dumb (beep)ery births from
the warbling throat hole of our defective president. Oh how fun the next election will be. (dramatic music) Meanwhile, it’s far more
likely that actual deepfakes aren’t going to affect the powerful and famous nearly as
badly as they will affect everyday folks, AKA the
ones with fewer resources to combat them. Like, if a video came out of James McAvoy (beep)ing the flared end of a clarinet, he would have a lot of ways to deny that. Either by trusting his
diehard fans to know that he would never make love to a woodwind, or, and this would be the
more conclusive answer, by publicly having sex
with a second clarinet in order to comparatively prove
the initial video was fake. Either way, this would surely
satisfy his fervent following of what I can only assume
are called Maniacavoys. But let’s say you’re not J. Voy, but rather a journalist trying to hold powerful
people accountable. Someone like Rana Ayyub, whose recent book accused
India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, of being
complicit in deadly riots that happened in her country. This reporting has resulted
in constant harassment on the internet, including
countless threats from people of opposing political parties, and part of that harassment
was a very disturbing deepfake video editing Rana into pornography, leading to a massive smear
campaign and doxxing. When she went to the police, she had to threaten media
exposure to even get them to file a report. To this day, the video
has not been taken down from the internet, what with the fact that
social media doesn’t give a big wad of (beep) about the truth so long as people continue
to use their platform, and this is the real
problem, the rotten root. Not deepfakes specifically,
but social media’s depressing complicity with bull(beep) in the interest of increased engagement. That doctored Nancy
Pelosi video, for example, Facebook refused to remove it, even after it was proven to be fake. After all, there’s nothing
technically illegal about it, and we just have no way to flag or pull content for
simply being propaganda, and when a company like
Facebook is called out for their bull(beep), they
often give an answer like this. – We need to rely on
and build sophisticated AI tools that can help
us flag certain content, and we’re getting good in certain areas. One of the areas I mentioned earlier was terrorist content, for example, where we now have AI
systems that can identify and take down 99% of the Al-Qaeda and ISIS related content in our system before someone, a human
even flags it to us. – A I. AI will solve everything, you guys. And by solve everything,
I mean solve everything specifically for social media companies who don’t want to get in trouble. It’s an extremely broad concept used to shut up old politicians, and as I already mentioned, is currently what’s being
proposed for combating deepfakes. Facebook is already telling the world that AI will solve this problem because much like how
adding more armed people will totally solve mass shootings, piling on more algorithms will totally get rid of bull(beep) on the internet. You know, especially since
those detection programs are already becoming outdated to more sophisticated deepfakes, at least according to
the people making them. It might seem weird at first
to compare this problem to gun control, but
it’s shockingly similar in that there are a lot of people who don’t want you to think about regulation. Facebook wants us to believe that their AI will solve this when the
problem is a lot larger and mostly centered on them as a company, and what if we really
wanted to solve deepfakes? We need to accept that
they are merely a symptom of a larger disease. A disease that can only be
cured by taking drastic measures against social media companies. Like, breaking them up, or
issuing age restrictions, or adding warning banners,
or creating careful rules about privacy, or really
just having any discussion about what to do with
Facebook that is framed by the accepted reality
that they are doing more harm than good and need to be regulated. Like guns or cigarettes or alcohol or weed or anything that’s generally awesome, at some point we had to
face the cold hard truth that it’s killing us and
needs to be controlled to some extent. Not abolished. Just controlled better. Social media is no different. It’s been hurting us for
a while, sometimes subtly. Deepfakes are just the
obvious hacking cough to the larger affliction. A hard to ignore reminder
that there is now an entire industry of
fake journalist grifters who create deceptive
narratives on social media and are actually taken seriously. That anonymous message board posts and unsourced memes are being accepted as facts by vulnerable, isolated people. That we’ve created a mainstream system designed to give propagandists
a very loud voice unlike ever before, and have yet to do anything
substantial to stop that. (dramatic music) Deepfakes are just one more unregulated and toxic aspect allowed
to be spread freely on major social media websites who don’t care about your wellbeing. Because they don’t. Their only goal is to keep you engaged. To keep you sharing information,
whether or not it’s true, and clicking on content, and the best way to do that is to bombard you with
emotional stimulation, be it in the form of outrage
or complete and total hogwash. Objectively, the worst kind of wash. It doesn’t matter to them, and if it weren’t for the public outrage, they would happily fill your timeline with Nazi stuff if it got them more views, and, sometimes that’s what they still do, and I guess we can’t blame
them for being a business, but we sure as (beep) can regulate them due to health concerns,
which is what this is. I know it’s easy to feel
like Facebook and Twitter are your friends. Something you’ve been
intimate with for a long time and probably even helped you
out in your darkest of times. Lord knows it’s great for self-promotion and connecting with loved ones,
but somewhere down a line, something very sinister took over. Like, it took the face, took Facebook off. Like the face of Facebook came off and switched with a villain, and we’ve been trusting it this whole time and had no idea that
they the face came off. Like that movie, “The Circle”. Do you remember that movie? Remember “The Circle”? It’s just like that. (dramatic music) I haven’t seen “The Circle”. Hi everybody, this is Cody and thank you for watching that episode about this topic and if you’d like to support us go to patreon.com/SomeMoreNews and check out our
podcast “Even More News”, and since you’re here, why not click like? And Subscribe? And the other YouTube stuff
that helps our channel and helps you let us know
what you think of it. (clicks tongue) This has been me, Cody.