Seattle Colleges Convocation 2015 – Full Event

Seattle Colleges Convocation 2015 – Full Event

August 29, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[MUSIC PLAYING] JOHN LEDERER: This
is a great place to work because the people. BAILEY JONES: I love
the people I work with. Thank you so much, Advising
Center, for being so awesome. SARAH FREEMAN: I just
want to say thank you for being the best teacher. Awesome. TERRI HEGEL: To Jason Petrait. LESHAWN DANDRIDGE:
Dale Oberlander. SARAH FREEMAN: Hi, Miss Page. ENJUNAY MONIQUE
JONES-LEE: I want to give a special shout out
to my teachers, Mr. Howard Anderson, Mr. Doug
Clapper, Mr. Todd Jones. HAZEL CICERON: Miss Cox. MARK PAYNE: Paul Bjelajac. REBECCA JOHNSTON: Camilla,
our main instructor and– AMARA MADEO: Ondine our
pattern making instructor. CATHERINE PALPALLATOL: And
Dorothy and Scott and all of the faculty at the
apparel design program here at Seattle Central. AMINA: Miss Judy, Miss
Jane, and Mr. John. TERRY COX: To all our
faculty, thank you, thank you, thank you. JOHN PHILLIPS: I’d like to say
thank you to staff and faculty here at South who have
created an incredibly supportive environment for me
to do my work in supporting student veterans. JOSHUA MCLAUGHLIN: You guys
have gone above and beyond to make sure my transition from
military life to seeking higher education has been seamless. TRACY HEINLEIN: I
love my students. PAUL VERSCHUEREN: I appreciate
new students for being here and really making my
life more interesting. TONY VO: I would like to
thank all the students here that makes my job
really rewarding and really fun and
just all the staff and all faculty that
really supports me in the work I do as the club
center coordinator here. So thank you. JENA YANG: That’s a good answer. Can I, like, copy that? JAN JOHNSON: I just want to
thank all the students who have shared their
struggles with me and allowed me to be
part of their success. KAREN WHITNEY: I’d just like
to say thank you to the Seattle colleges for helping students,
helping make students’ dreams and educational
goals come through. CHALEASE ANDERSON: People
go out of their way and I just want to say
thank you to everyone. JACOB JONES: Thank
you Seattle College Thank you Mary
[? Hattly ?] and thank you Jeff for giving me
a tremendous opportunity for employment. GERALD SHIELDS: Thank you for
giving me this opportunity to improve my lot in life. HECTOR HERNANDEZ: Hi
[INAUDIBLE] and Mr. Moore. I’m thankful for
the GED classes. You guys have shown me
that I can be successful. WENDY JAMES: I want to
thank North Seattle College because it has enhanced my
life as an artist and a person so much. TAUMAS GRIGSBY: I just wanted to
give a big thanks out too Jim, Lee, the entire bricklayers
union for giving me this great opportunity. JOE HANNAN: Send
a thanks to Max. Max is the groundskeeper here
at the Georgetown campus. And he does a stellar
job down here. RANDY NICKELL: He does. ALL: Thank you. SPEAKER 1: Thank you very much. SPEAKER 2: Thank you. SPEAKER 3: Thank you. YVONNE STARKS: Students
say oh yeah, I know you. You helped me on SVI. IAN SIADAK: I would like
to give a huge thank you to the Seattle Colleges for
supporting sustainability, not only for our students
and their learning but also for the broader Seattle
community that we’re a part of. SUZANNE WHITEHEAD: Thank
you, North Seattle College for being such an amazing
resource for the community as a whole and for me personally
and for both of my children who’ve also gone here. GERTIE DE GUZMAN
MORSELETTO: For my son, who now is studying
at Seattle University and got a full scholarship. He was here as a
running start student. And my other daughter who is
now graduating here for running start. He’s going to New York. So start here go
anywhere is true. JOHN LEDERER: We’re all
dedicated to providing opportunity for students and
opportunity for the community. And that’s why I
love working here. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRADLEY LANE: Good
morning, everyone. I’m Bradley Lane, the Dean of
Humanities and Social Sciences here at Seattle Central College. And I’m pleased to
be your MC today. Before we begin, let’s
give a round of applause to Brian Kirk, whose
music faculty here at Central and his bandmates– [APPLAUSE] [INAUDIBLE] and
Butch Harrison for their pre-funk entertainment. Collectively they are
known as Good Company and they are indeed. I also want us to
thank volunteers. We could not hold convocation
without volunteers and you will know them
by their orange lanyards. So let’s give a
round of applause to volunteers for
making this happen. [APPLAUSE] Thanks to the SSCTV crew for
taping this morning’s program. It is being live
streamed and it will be available afterward to those
who were unable to join us today as well. One final note. Please silence
your phone ringers so everyone can
enjoy the program. If you want to share some
compelling points from the program this morning in
the breakout sessions that will follow, we encourage you
to post on social media, tagging us @SeattleColleges and
using the very official #CCON15 for this year’s program. We’ve got a full morning,
so let’s get started with some introductions. Please hold your
applause until the end. With me on stage
are Carmen Gayton, Chair of the Board of Trustees,
and trustees [INAUDIBLE] and Jorge Carrasco. Chancellor Jill Wakefield,
and special guests, Dr. Manuel Pastor, Norm
Rice, and Mark Secord. Trustees Teresita Batayola
and Louise Chernin send their regrets that they’re
unable to join us today. So round of– [APPLAUSE] We also can welcome
the district leadership team, who are in the front row. And please stand
as I call on you. We’ll, again, hold our
applause until the end. We welcome Central’s Interim
President, Dr. Sheila Edwards Lange. The president of North Seattle
College, Dr. Warren Brown. President of South Seattle
College, Gary Oertli. Kurt Buttleman, Vice
Chancellor Finance– [AUDIO OUT] [INAUDIBLE] I should just forget. [LAUGHTER] [AUDIO OUT] Education research and planning
and Associate Vice Chancellors Bruce Genung and Malcolm Grothe. A round of applause for
our leadership team. [APPLAUSE] SHEILA EDWARDS
LANGE: [INAUDIBLE]. Get it going. OK. On behalf of Seattle Central
College and our community and faculty, staff,
and students, it’s my pleasure to
welcome you to our campus for the district’s
annual convocation event. And for many of you this might
be your first time meeting me. I’m Sheila Edwards
Lange and I’m honored to serve as the interim
president here at Central. You going to replace it here? [APPLAUSE] OK, I started my position. [LAUGHTER] Don’t you just love technology? We did a walk through yesterday. Everything was perfect,
nothing went wrong. OK, there we are. So I started my
position last month, right as summer
quarter was ending, and this gave me an
opportunity to actually get to know many of you and to
get my bearings before the fall quarter rush begins. For some of you, you
may know that I was here in the district before as well
as at North Seattle College. So why did I return
to the district? For me it was an opportunity to
lead a very proud institution, one of the most diverse in the
state and indeed the nation. In fact, the Chronicle
of Higher Education recently ranked us as number 15
in the country for our student diversity. And that is among
four year colleges. Yes, that is worth
some applause. [APPLAUSE] I believe passionately in
the power of two year schools to provide affordable
and accessible education to our community
and those who are trying to better their lives
and those of their families. I’m a native Mississippian
and grew up in California, but I’ve been in
Seattle for 28 years. And for those of
you who are natives, I like to claim that I’m a
native because at 25 years I think I should be
able to claim that. But I am not a native, I’ve
just been here 28 years. For the past 16 years, I’ve been
at the University of Washington serving as Vice President
for Minority Affairs and Vice Provost for Diversity. Seattle Central last hosted
convocation three years ago, and in that time a lot
has been happening here. Our International
Education program moved into new facilities. We broke ground on a new
building for our Maritime Academy in Ballard. Construction is progressing on
our new Health Education Center in the Pacific Tower building. And we’ve hired a new
interim executive dean at SVI and we’re working
with the community to strengthen and revitalize
our programs there. There are a lot of exciting
things going on at Central. You’ll also notice quite
a lot of construction around the campus. As you’ve no doubt
heard and seen, Capitol Hill is
experiencing quite a boom, and it’s anchored by the
new light rail station that will open next year. And this promises to provide
a direct link from our campus to neighborhoods to
the south and even to the University of Washington. The chancellor and
the district team have planned an exciting
program this morning, which I’m sure you’ll enjoy. While you’re here,
please make yourself at home on the Seattle
Central campus. And if you have a
little time, walk around, explore the campus and
the surrounding neighborhood. Thank you so much for
being here this morning. We’re pleased to welcome you
to the Seattle Central campus. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] BRADLEY LANE: Now
representatives from our employee
unions are also here with some brief remarks. Please welcome Ty
Pethe, President of the local Washington
Federation of State Employees and Annette Stofer, the new
Seattle president of American Federation for Teachers. [APPLAUSE] TY PETHE: Good morning. First of all I want
to say that it’s good to see some green shirts
in the room for green shirt Wednesday. I think it’s an
important celebration of our hardworking
[? classified ?] staff on campus and
recognition of the work that we keep doing to keep this
school running 365 days a year. I also want to say that
in that, most of our staff have had a challenging summer of
getting prepared for this fall. And I think that all
of us, faculty, staff, and administration,
know what it’s like to rush and not
have everything completed at the end of the day. That stress, that
pressure can build. But I think it’s a
testament to all of us that we still show up. Every single one of us. Because we are driven
to help students. And sometimes we
need to learn just let some things go
and focus on what’s meaningful and valuable
to us, which is, again, providing those opportunities. I think that this is especially
poignant this year as we have so much change and transition. There’s going to be some
adversities that we’ll have to overcome and we’ll
have to work together to build bridges and strong
community and be active. This will a year for
growth and change and it takes all of us
working as a community to get this done. Just as a quick business aside
for my [? classified ?] members here in the audience,
we do have copies of the brand new contract for
our members outside the table. We also have membership cards
if you’d like to sign up. And I think that it’s
important that we start planning for this year now. I think that it takes
all of us working together and cooperating
to truly run this campus. Because it’s not just
the faculty, the staff, or the administration. It’s all of us working together
to provide for the students. And I’m happy and
proud that I will be working with you as a
colleague with every single one here, because I could
not ask for better people to join me on providing
those opportunities. Let’s all be thankful
for where we’ve come from and how we’ve gotten here. And I hope that we
can all be excited for another wonderful
year of seeing students grow and succeed. Thank you for joining me. [APPLAUSE] ANNETTE STOFER: Good morning. On behalf of AFT Seattle,
our faculty union, welcome back to doing the
rewarding, essential work that we all do to educate and
help people change their lives. It’s a great honor to be a
member of the Seattle College’s faculty and an even
bigger honor to be elected to the presidency
of AFT Seattle. I believe I’m the
first president to come from South campus. [APPLAUSE] And I’m the first
part time faculty member to be elected
into the position. [APPLAUSE] We have a great
new executive board and it’s already begun its work. We know that we
have big challenges and important responsibilities. We’ll be asking the faculty
very soon, hopefully next week, to weigh in on the
distribution of the 3% COLA. Then we’ll get to work on
preparations for negotiations on the full contract. We need to support the new
diversity in hiring task force as well as community partners
who address discrimination. We’ll be lending support to
the new AFT professional staff union. Equally important,
we’ll be demonstrating what it means to be part
of the labor movement and why it matters. And it does matter. Anyone paying
attention to the news knows that there’s a
resurgence of collective action among employees in all
sorts of workplaces. The struggles for fair wages,
safety in the workplace, and fair working conditions
are not only about work, they’re about social justice. Strong labor unions
improve conditions for members and nonmembers,
for workers with the right to organize and for others in
so-called right to work states. Labor unions built
the middle class and are needed to save
it from extinction. [APPLAUSE] More and more Americans
are understanding these relationships and are
expressing positive attitudes about unions. After decades of
losing ground, the word is in that unions are
becoming popular again. Never thought I would find
myself in the popular group. It’s exciting for me
personally to play a small role in making changes, and I
look forward to the good work that we can all do together. When we join together, we
make great things happen. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] BRADLEY LANE: And now
it’s my extreme honor to welcome Chancellor
Jill Wakefield. As you know, Dr. Wakefield
has spent her entire career with the Seattle Colleges. And after 40 years,
this is going to be her last convocation. She has a full agenda before
she retires in June though. So for now, let’s start her
final year with a rousing welcome. Chancellor Wakefield. [APPLAUSE] JILL WAKEFIELD: Thank you. Wow. Wow, thank you. Well, I have my Kleenex here. And I just realized that how
I’m positioned next to whoever is speaking, so every time I
look who’s speaking I see me and I think I need
to shift just a bit. So good morning and welcome
to the start of another year. No, it’s not just another year. It’s another great year. The Pope’s in the
country, and Xi Jinping, the President of China,
is just a few blocks away. But the big news is
in our classrooms, where next week we will
serve, mentor, and teach the 27,000 who will change
their worlds and ours. And as I listen to
the diplomats that are meeting with the
Chinese representatives, I think that the
real changes in China will happen from the students
who are in our classrooms and at our colleges. We will make a difference. You will make a
difference in this world. [APPLAUSE] So I want to thank Seattle
Central for hosting. It it’s always good to get a new
interim president on and say, the first thing you need to
do within your first month is to host convocation. Thank you, Dr. Sheila Edwards
Lange, for being a great sport. There’s a lot of work and it’s
on top of everything else. So glad you’re with us. I also want to thank
the host with the most. Dr. Lane. I remember when I
tenured him, and that’s one of my great pride points. And also thanks to the
convocation committee. I know it’s taken all
summer to get this and we want to make it a special
event for everyone who’s here. Well, as you might know,
it’s a big year for me. But next year will be our
50th anniversary, and many of you today in
the room, and I see so many people I’ve
worked with, will lead us into the next 50 years. You have built such a strong
foundation that we are ready and you will change not the
first 50, but the second 50. So much has changed, but
the foundation and values of our district have not. We serve everyone who
comes through our doors. We close the opportunity gap
and create pathways from poverty to good jobs and good lives. We help every resident
reach the middle class and we continue to
meet the workforce needs of business and industry
in Seattle and beyond. Our founders would say you
have exceeded their hopes for the Seattle Colleges. You have truly changed Seattle. Well, working with you on these
important, critical mission has changed my life. Well, something else
that hasn’t changed. We know that each
student’s success is based on a lot of
things, but nothing greater than a special
relationship with someone at our colleges. A faculty, an adviser,
the program assistant, the security guard,
the people that meet me at the
parking lot every day, someone who truly
cares about him or her as a student,
as a person, and offers the
encouragement of a mentor. I think I found that
that’s true for all of us. Well, 22 years ago
or 23 years ago, Suma Yagi, who had
worked at South Seattle for a number of years
and most recently with me in the
development office when I was working there,
she retired in 1992. I thought she would take
off into retirement. But every September since
that, time that’s 23 years, she calls me. She tells me she cares. She encourages me and
reminds me of the great work our colleges do. Then she doesn’t stop there. She calls me two or
three times a year. And it always seems to be when
it’s something really good, something really good
in the newspaper. She congratulates me and says
I had something to do with it. And when the news is
bad, she calls and says, you know, things are
going to be fine. Don’t forget why
we do what we do. You are doing a great job. Suma knows that Maya
Angelou was right. People forget what
you said and did, but they will never forget
how you made them feel. Suma, thank you for making me
feel confident and competent and courageous to keep fighting
our colleges, our students, and our futures. Would you stand up
and let us thank you. Suma Yagi, who’s
88 today is here. [APPLAUSE] Thank you, Suma,
for being there. You know, here’s my wish, that
we all are a bit more like Suma as we support and encourage
each other and our students. Well, I’m very proud to be
part of a learning college. And I’m grateful that you
have allowed me to learn while serving as chancellor. And I’ve mostly learned the
hard way, in a very public way. So I want to start by wishing
you a good Yom Kippur. I’m not done. I have learned so much
about this special time the last few weeks. It’s a reflection
on the year that was and a commitment to be
better in the year ahead. A time of learning from
mistakes and committing to do the right thing next time. What a perfect message for me. This district’s strongest
values, our strongest values in our recognition of,
our appreciation for, and celebration of diversity. In the year ahead,
I hope some of you will work with me
to examine what this commitment to
diversity looks like. How can we better
honor the beliefs and the values of each
faculty, staff, and students? You know, as a
frequent camper, I was raised that you
make the campsite better for the next person. I will make this better
for the next chancellor. So I’ve also been thinking
about transitions. Not just for me, but
for this great city and our great district. For me, I want to
thank so many of you for your good thoughts and
your interesting suggestions about what I might do next. From joining the
West Seattle Senior Center to running
for public office and becoming a ham
radio operator. And then last week I went to the
Puyallup Fair and I saw Heart. Did you know Anne and
Nancy are 65 and 61? So my sons, whose biggest fear
is their mother with nothing to do, has suggested that I get
involved with a band, perhaps a ukulele group. Well, quite frankly,
I’m not thinking of such dramatic
transitions, more like maybe sleeping in a bit,
learning to cook and drink good wine, little more tennis,
maybe one more working gig. Not necessarily in that order. Well, it’s the same for Seattle. I’ve really gotten used
to the ups and downs, the changes in the economy. And I’ve worked with many
of you to develop and offer those programs that
responded to each. We weathered the expansion, then
the crash, then the reemergence of the technology industry. We started new programs to
respond to economic growth in health care, manufacturing,
maritime, aerospace. We closed the programs that
didn’t pay family wage jobs. However, in the last
two or three years as we’ve come out
of the recession, Seattle has moved to boom mode. I’ve never seen
anything like this. Last year 18,000 new
residents, 15,000 jobs. Or maybe it was the
other way around. It doesn’t matter. We’re the fastest growing
city in the nation and we’re growing faster
than the gold rush in terms of new residents. The hottest area in
Seattle on the west coast is Capitol Hill, where
I checked the other day. Yes, all you Seattle, here
we are in the coolest area in the country. So I checked what it
would cost to live here. And I guess it’s about 1,600
for a studio, 1,900 a month for one bedroom. But they’re filling up. So as Amazon tells us,
they’ll have not 15,000, 50,000 employees
in downtown Seattle in the next couple years. This should be really
good news for us, but only if we focus
on who’s living here, who’s working here,
and how we better serve them. You know, what’s the education
resident of new residents is about 75% from out of state
and 68% from out of state, 75% from other countries have
bachelor’s degrees are higher. Median age of our new
residents, about 28. Top 25 occupations are
in our sweet spots, the things we train. IT, computers, health
care, business, maritime, manufacturing, hospitality. These are in the sweet spots
of our middle wage jobs. We will need to know that
every person who lives here can thrive in Seattle. Well the challenges are
great and the opportunities are greater and we’re up to it. Well, I know we can’t
batten down hatches and wait for the old normal to return
to our city or our colleges. The ground keeps shifting in
fundamental ways for Seattle in higher ed. We’re really
reframing our approach to face the new normal for
our city, its residents, and our students. Students have chosen us
to fulfill their hopes. Our job is to connect them
with the promise of Seattle. So I want to talk
just a little bit about what I see
in the year ahead and what’s on my to do
list and perhaps yours. You’re going to hear a
lot in the year ahead about enrollment. And I know you have and
we’re working so hard. Well, one reason
why it’s important is last week the State
Board for Community Colleges adopted a new
allocation formula that is totally enrollment driven. We think it has flaws and
that it’s Seattle unfriendly. But until we can convince
more folks of that, we’ll be living with it. If we continue last
year’s enrollment, we could see a $4
million reduction in the following year. But here’s the good news. Enrollment is up this year
at all of our colleges. And in transfer academic
programs, we’re up 11% in enrollment. Central’s up 7%, North’s
up 13%, South’s up 15%. I wish I could tell you why,
but I only found out yesterday. I think it’s good news. And we will let you
what’s happening that’s changing that more
and more folks are coming to our transfer programs. Well we’re also, if we’re
shifting our programs to meet the needs
of this new Seattle, I think we will meet
and exceed our targets. But it’s challenging and
we’re shifting our sales to respond to the
changing winds. So in January, we’ll open the
Pacific Health Care training up on the hill in the
old Amazon building. While it has primarily
Central and SVI programs, it’s designed to expand our
programs at every college throughout the district. We intend to own health
care training in this city. It should be what we’re doing. It’s what we can do
as we come together. We will be first
choice for those that need health
care training up to the bachelor’s degree level. [APPLAUSE] Each of our colleges regularly
assesses students, faculty, and staff for planning. This year we’re going to
ask the community what they think of us, what
they need from us to serve their educational needs. We’ll be conducting
that in the fall. Third, with the 3%
unemployment rate in Seattle, we’ve developed a strategy. How do we serve adults who are
working, they have families, and they want an education? So we’re establishing a college
for working adults as more of a welcome advising
center open days, evenings, and weekends, making it easier
to access and to complete our programs. Now, thank you to the
board of trustees. Last week they voted to allow
new residents, beginning winter quarter, from other
states to pay in state tuition for their first year. Let’s get more of those
residents in our class now. And I think they’ll
stay with us. And then when they get
burned out by their jobs at certain employers
in Seattle, we’ll have a second chance for them. Well, we know business
and industries have huge needs in training. They’ve told us, we can’t keep
up with our training needs. So we’re taking a
district wide approach to providing training for
business and industry, knowing that it’s an advantage
for us to work together to bring the strengths of
each college to the table, expanding our reach, avoiding
duplication, and working together more
effectively to meet the needs of these
companies that are bringing so many employees to our area. Well, I want to congratulate
the math faculty for your recent recognition
in the Seattle Times about how you are
transforming math and through Statway
accelerated math programs, nearly doubling the percentage
of those who make it to college level within one year. We’re changing the college
experience, the completion experience. We now have completion
coaches at every college. We’re looking at how making
advising more proactive and creating clear
education pathways. This year we introduce
predictive analytics. It’s how we use
technology to help us provide the extra
time and the help to students who
need it the most. Why does it matter? Well, going to college is great. But when you complete
it, it changes your life and that of your family. My next is we will have
completed faculty negotiations. Yay. [LAUGHS] We’ll work toward it. Where are you? Annette? Yes. Where? OK, Annette will
be working on that. And finally, we
found that thousands of students who have
contacted us for information never enroll. So we have a CRM
program to capture every one of those students
and to better connect them with our services, our programs,
our faculty, and staff. The more students know how much
they mean to us, how much we care about them, how
much we want them, I think you’ll see
record enrollment. So watch for that. We’ve also embarked on the
largest fundraising campaign in our college’s history. We’ve raised 16.5 million
for capital improvements at Pacific Tower. We’ve raised more than 4 million
for equipment and scholarships for students in health care. South Seattle’s 13th year
has raised $6 million. The other colleges
are raising funds all to better
support our students, to change Seattle colleges,
to change Seattle an increase income equity in this city. Well, those are just
some of the things you’ll be hearing about at
the colleges in addition to many college initiatives. But I’m going to take
this chance just a minute to talk about what I see for
the my vision for the future. And then in about
10 years, maybe I’ll be calling someone here
and see how close I got. Well, I think affordability. We’re going to get
a handle on cost. The free tuition initiative
that started at the, actually it started
at South Seattle, but we’re giving President
Obama credit for it, that we should
have free tuition. This grassroots effort comes
from nearly a century ago. It was a movement the made
high school widely available and helped lead to rapid
growth in education and skills training. We prospered in the
20th century because we had the best educated
citizenry in the world. Other countries
have passed us by and it’s now time to
get all Americans to get the knowledge and skills to
meet the demands of this growing global economy without having
to take on decades of debt. We’ve done it here. I think we’ll continue to do it. And I hope, if you think
it’s important too, that you’ll talk to your
legislators and others about how free
community college will make a difference in this city
and the lives of always serve. Well, we’ll also improve
college readiness. We’ll be working with
Seattle public schools. I’m guessing, I believe that
more and more of their students will come to us college
ready in math and English. This means that more
students are graduating. So presidents, I
think you’ve got to start thinking about bigger
spaces for your commencement, because you’re going to
have more people walking across the stage. If they come ready, we’ll
double our completion rates. We’ll also close our
community’s skill gap. Health care, manufacturing,
maritime, across our district, IT, hospitality. It is our sweet spot. We need to convince
this city to tell them we can work as partners
to meet the demand. And I’ve said it’s
collaborate to compete. Because I think you’ll
see more partnerships than you’ve ever seen
before, to have a deeper impact on the city, to
create more opportunities and to link together a
community of workers, thinkers, and business. We have found ways. We will have found ways to make
college affordable, relevant, accessible, and personalized. The light rail, I think,
has a great impact to change many of our
colleges, as students see our colleges as destination. We also, and I wouldn’t have
said this a couple weeks ago, we need to be part of the
affordable housing discussion. Not only just for our employees,
but that we have space and there are people. So there’s a couple things. We need to look at how we use
our space at our colleges. But also, can we
look at facilities that would offer workforce
housing, perhaps, for our employees as well
as classrooms and labs? Some new kind of models. But if we aren’t in this
affordable housing discussion, I think it will happen around
us and that’s a bad thing. So I encourage us to
really look at what that means for us and for our
employees and for our students. You’ll find more Seattle College
classes in area high schools, at the University of
Washington, in area businesses and communities
where students live. I think we’ll have
more facilities. Rainier Valley, SVI,
you’ll see a whole new SVI that’s vibrant and
speaks to the community. We’ll offer more programs. Online, evenings, weekends. And I want to thank Mark
Webber from North who has a HVAC program who is
developing our first competency based program, an HVAC program. So we’ll want to
hear more about that. Where’s Mark? Yeah, North. So the other is global. We will be recognized as Seattle
colleges as the global college. Beyond a first choice for
international students, but for our curriculum
that prepares students to work anywhere
and programs that provide opportunities for
local students to study abroad. Expanding programs like Teach
in China and Global Impact. If we’re in Seattle,
we’re the place to do it. And finally, funding. My crystal ball doesn’t
see full funding, but I think we’ll have
developed a sustainable funding model that actually
works, and it won’t be reliant on the state. But it’ll be a combination
of local funds, state, federal grants, private
contracts, international funds. We need to take advantage
of our location and benefits of this great city. I do see that we will
have made great strides in paying our faculty and
staff competitive wages. [APPLAUSE] Well, the key to my vision,
the future of our colleges and the key to our
graduates’ future is our leadership,
the leadership of every person in this room. The Seattle Colleges are truly
the key to economic mobility, income inequality, and
an educated citizenry. We shape and are
shaped by Seattle. The new American dream will
continue to start here. Well, next week 27,000
students will start classes at North Seattle, South
Seattle, Seattle Central, and Seattle
Vocational Institute, because they believe in you. They believe the
colleges will take them from where they are to
where they want to go. Their confidence is well placed. You will exceed
their expectations. Let them know they’ve
made the right choice. They have unlimited potential
to change their lives and those of their families. Let them know that
you have faith in their capacity for
creativity and growth and how much you will
accomplish together. Give them a Suma Yagi. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] Well, it is my honor
to recognize the lead for innovation 2015
innovation of the year. It’s been awarded to our
Ready Set Transfer program. Now, the Ready Set
Transfer in innovation created academies to support
STEM or aspiring STEM students. Ready students are earlier
in their STEM studies. STEM studies including
students in pre-college math. Set students are on their
way for a STEM major and transfer students are
completing in 200 level STEM courses in their
chosen field and doing undergraduate coursework as
well as subsidized capstone projects. This has been a
wonderful initiative that we’ve increased the
number of STEM students going on, transferring. And I really want
to congratulate those who have been involved
and provided the leadership from Seattle Central. And if you would
stand if you’re here so that we might recognize you. We have Rebecca Hartzler,
Dan Poux, Wendy Rockhill, Susan Tsoglin, Josh
Whorley, John Wiseley. From North, Linda McDuffie,
Ann Murkowski, Abby Muro, Brian Rucci, Mike Steffancin. And from South, Jake Ashcroft,
Carolyn Bevan, Ryan Dorman, Rick Downs, and Pete Lortz. Congratulations and thank
you for your great work. [APPLAUSE] We have an award and
we’ll probably give it so that you can each rotate it. Or maybe we’ll just
have three or four made so that we can do that. And now it’s my honor
to introduce my boss, the Chair of the Seattle
College’s Board of Trustees, who when he was elected
for chair, I don’t think he knew that his job would be
selecting a new chancellor. But thank you for
taking that on, boss. I’m going to make
sure that you get it done so that I can leave. So with that, I’d like
to introduce Steve Hill. [APPLAUSE] STEVE HILL: Good morning. I’m really pleased to
be here and honored. Honored to be here and
honored to be the chair of your Board of Trustees. Before I do what I’m
supposed to do here, I just want to say that I
think that we were really fortunate to have Chancellor
Wakefield for the past seven years. And I’m very
pleased as a trustee to hear her agenda
that she outlined for you in her remarks. And its good that
we’re going to continue to have this very strong
leadership of this district over the next year and
we will do our best to find somebody to
fill these huge shoes. So thank you,
Chancellor Wakefield. [APPLAUSE] Chancellor Wakefield spoke about
the importance of collaboration and remaining competitive. And the innovation
of the year award is a perfect example of that. And you noticed
when she read off the names of the people involved
that it was all three colleges. And the partnerships among our
colleges is really important and what made that
program successful. We also have partnerships
outside our system. And they are important to adding
to the success of our district. Two years ago, we established
the Constance Rice Partner of the Year award to
honor external partners. The criteria for this
Constance Rice Award included the nominee’s role
in building public support for the Seattle Colleges, the
impact on advancing issues important to the colleges and
students, work and achievement over and above those
required by the regular role of this organization or
person, and their support of the mission and
student outcomes of Seattle Colleges
through time, service, and or philanthropy. It’s only fitting
that this award is named after Dr. Constance Rice. Dr. Rice had an
exceptional effect on our district, students,
and the colleges. Dr. rice and the
Seattle Colleges go back more than 20 years. She joined our district
as Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement. Her assignment was to
spearhead the district’s first district wide
fundraising campaign. She pulled together some of
the region’s top leadership from Boeing and
Seattle First Bank. And six years later,
we had completed Building the Best, which was
the largest community college campaign in the US. During that time, she also
served as Interim President of North Seattle,
helping the college to celebrate its
25th anniversary. She was named a
Senior Chancellor with a responsibility for
Information Technology to fund development. At the district, she
worked with Microsoft to establish a computer
integrated curriculum called Cities, the Center for
Intercreative Technologies. And she created the Martin
Luther King Jr. Math Science Collaboration to introduce
Seattle’s school children to opportunities in technical
and scientific careers. She left our college community
as a trustee three years ago, but I don’t think she actually
left because she’s now region of U-Dub and it
makes me more confident that we have a region at U-Dub
that understands our world as well as she does. Her list of contributions
to our region is long and we are grateful
to have her continue as a partner in our work. Dr. Rice is recovering
from hip surgery. And here on her behalf is
former Seattle mayor, Norm Rice. Norm. [APPLAUSE] NORM RICE: This award
is totally fitting, because Constance is
by far the greatest partner I could ever have. And everything that
I’ve done in life has been shaped
around her belief in education and opportunity. And one of the things I
think is most important is that making students safe,
healthy, and ready to learn is by far one of the most
important ingredients we could have so that you
can do your jobs better. This award is so important
in the sense of what this community college can do. And what we ought to do
is to create partnerships with other people who
can make a difference. So she was delighted that
Neighbor Care Health was chosen to receive this award. For more than 40
years, Neighbor Care has provided a health care
home for our most vulnerable neighbors. It is the largest provider
of primary medical, dental, and behavioral health care
science services in Seattle, focusing on low income,
uninsured families, individuals, seniors
on fixed incomes, immigrants, and the homeless. Each year the staff care
for almost 50,000 patients at its 24 nonprofit
medical, dental, and school based clinics. They ask everyone
to pay what they can and no one is turned away
due to the inability to pay. When Seattle Colleges look for
partners in the PacMed tower, bringing Neighbor Care on board
made the most perfect sense. Its dentists and staff will
serve as adjunct faculty to the Seattle Colleges,
greatly enhancing our ability to provide side by side training
and instruction for students. They’ll get a smaller
professional to student ratio to provide that side by side
instruction and supervision. Executive Director and CEO
Mark Secord and his team took the lead in
securing funding, which resulted in getting the
largest grants ever awarded by the King County
Dental Society, $50,000. And also Delta
Dental, $2 million. I would like to say– [APPLAUSE] On behalf of Constance,
the great partner, and on behalf of
this school, we’d like to congratulate and thank
Mark Secord and Neighbor Care Health. [APPLAUSE] Mark. Thank you [INAUDIBLE]. Slide that out. MARK SECORD: Well, thank you,
Mayor Rice and President Hill. On behalf of the board and
staff at Neighbor Care Health, I’m thrilled and humbled
to accept this award from the colleges. It’s significant, I think,
that we share the word community in our names. We’re a community health center. You are a set of wonderful
community colleges. And I think the
word community is a sacred word in our language. And it’s all about partnership. It’s all about relationships. For years we have a
treasured our relationship with the Seattle
Colleges and we provided just loads of field training
experiences to students. And we’ve hired a good many
graduates over the years to come and work
at Neighbor Care. With the teaching dental
center at Pacific Tower, we’re taking this partnership
to a higher level. And by this time
next year we’ll be creating new classes
of dental hygiene students and dental assisting
students from Seattle Central and from SVI, who will arrive
at the new, beautiful Allied Health Headquarters
at Pacific Tower. And by that time,
Neighbor Care will have up and operating a
beautiful new 20 chair dental clinic. Our aim is two fold. To bolster the city’s
safety net dental resources and attack this issue of
access to dental care, which is our number one health
care access problem in this community. And simultaneously,
be turning out the very best
skilled and prepared exceptional dental hygienists
and dental assistants in the state. That’s our goal. Those partnerships between
health care providers and the academic side of
health care are never easy. But it’s the people that
are going to make this work. And I do want to just say
before I close, thank you to Chancellor Wakefield
for her leadership, to Dean David Gourd,
who’s been fabulous throughout this whole process,
and to Ona Canfield and Roberta Byrd-Wright, the
people who will be making this work on the
ground with their students and faculty. And lastly, to our wonderful
Chief Dental Officer, Dr. Sara VanderBeek
Those are the folks that will make this partnership
a reality and a very, very exciting development. The first of its kind in
the entire United States, I might add, working
in this dental field. So we are, again,
excited about this. I’m thrilled and honored
to receive the award today. Thank you very much. [APPLAUSE] BRADLEY LANE: I look forward
to this portion of convocation every year where we have the
Trustees Lifelong Learning Awards. I’m always inspired by the
recipients and their dedication to students, their jobs, and
to our college community. We collectively do
great work because of so many great individuals. The Trustees Lifelong
Learning Award is made in recognition
and support of the importance of
continued intellectual and professional growth of
all members of the Seattle Colleges. Conceived 25 years ago as a
means of rewarding excellence, its primary purpose is to
encourage faculty, staff, and administrators to
value and actively pursue learning for learning’s sake. The awards are intended
for costs associated with professional association
meetings, conferences, professional development
classes, college coursework, and similar activities
which would enhance the awardees
individual intellectual and or professional development. Each of today’s
recipients will receive $1,500 toward that goal. The awards have special
meaning because the nominations are submitted by you,
by us, colleagues who see their
accomplishments day to day. Some of their work is
highlighted in the program that you have. They also have some words
of inspiration for the start of this academic year. Please welcome at this time,
trustees Jorge Carrasco and Carmen Gayton here to
present the Trustees Lifelong Learning Awards. [APPLAUSE] CARMEN GAYTON: Thanks, Brad. Good morning, everyone. It’s a pleasure to be here
with you this morning. I’m trying to get this mic up. It’s a privilege to recognize
the accomplishments of people who make Seattle
Colleges so great. It is also a challenge
to choose just four to receive this award. You each contribute to
our students’ success. First let’s congratulate
Analea Brauburger, part time faculty at South. [APPLAUSE] She’s a part time
faculty member at South where she teaches
Spanish and psychology and is a certified
canvas trainer. Analea would you join
me on stage please? Is she here? Analea is a first
generation college graduate who really has never left
the classroom since starting kindergarten at just age four. Her education has always been
free and or funded through scholarships. Analea says, “My
Peace Corps and Teach For America service and
continued work at Seattle Colleges are my way of
showing appreciation for the life my
education has allowed me to experience and enjoy. After earning my degrees
at extremely large state universities, it’s a pleasure
to teach at Seattle colleges where my students and I can
truly interact and learn from one another.” So since she isn’t
here, maybe she’s caught in all the
traffic, I’d like to congratulate Analea
and wish her all the best. SPEAKER 4: I nominated Analea
She’s got a stomach virus and really regrets she
couldn’t be here today. CARMEN GAYTON: Well thank you
so much for your nomination. And it’s also her birthday. [APPLAUSE] And it’s also her birthday. So if you would
take back to Analea our greetings of birthday wishes
to her, I would appreciate it. You also spared me from having
to sing Happy Birthday to her, so thank you very much. Secondly, I’d like to recognize
Vanessa Calonzo, Director of New Student Services Excel. So Vanessa, would
you join me on stage? [APPLAUSE] Vanessa is continuously
inspired by the resiliency of our students. On a daily basis, students
navigate our systems, balance their lives
and work, and try to find a sense of confidence
in what they are learning. We play a pivotal role in
the positive transformation that education can play,
not only on the individual, but for their family and
even for their community. Vanessa says, “Our
work is life changing. I challenge you all to be
inspired by our students’ efforts and recognize our
opportunity to advocate by being the example of
a continuous learner. Be willing to make
development a priority through further education,
innovative projects, and partnerships.” Congratulations, Vanessa. [APPLAUSE] Now it is my pleasure
to turn the podium over to my fellow trustee,
Jorge Carrasco. [APPLAUSE] JORGE CARRASCO:
Thank you, Carmen. Good morning. So I have the privilege of
recognizing the last two recipients of this award. And I’d like to
just point out that in every successful
organization, one of the most important things
that an organization can do is acknowledge people that do
great work in an organization and that make a big
difference in making the organization successful. And that is ultimately what
these awards are all about. And I have the privilege of
recognizing two individuals. One is Lynne Hull. [APPLAUSE] So Lynne is a member of the
arts faculty at North Seattle College. She’s been with North
Seattle College for 26 years. That’s a long time. But she hasn’t only
been there, she’s actually made a big difference. She’s been a very engaged
member of the faculty. She’s been a participant in
the Arts Task Force, which is a committee that tries
to preserve and maintain and promote the arts. She’s responsible for a highly
regarded jewelry program that is one of the few
accredited programs remaining in the area. And she has done a
lot to raise funds to support the arts program
at North Seattle College. She comes from a military
family, so as you would expect, she has a very
strong work ethic, she’s committed
to social justice, and she believes
that public education is a solution to many of the
inequalities in our society. I’m very pleased to
be able to honor her. Despite having
struggled with dyslexia, she was able to be
successful in arts classes and make a huge difference
in terms of the arts program at North Seattle College. And we’re honored to
have her on our faculty and to enjoy the many
contributions she’s brought. [APPLAUSE] So last but not any less
important is Greg McBrady. [APPLAUSE] So we all know how
important technology is. I think we learned that
earlier this morning. And whenever technology
doesn’t work, you need to have someone
that knows technology well, who is a problem
solver, and who can make technology work for you. And that’s exactly what
Greg McBrady has been doing for the last nine years. So Greg is an Information
Technology Specialist at the Siegel Center. If you’ll read about
his background, he has been in this
role for nine years. And like many people
that take a job and make it more than it was
ever planned or intended to be, that’s exactly
what Greg has done. He’s taken this
information technology job and has made it his
business to make sure that he’s up to
speed on technology and that he’s able to craft
the right technical solutions for the organization. People see him as
a problem solver. They see him as creative. They see him as someone that
they can go two with a problem and be able to get help. And that’s what has
really made him stand out in this particular role. According to Greg,
every college graduate helps level the playing field. The best colleges
obviously award a paper certificate
that stipulates that you have mastered whatever
program you’ve enrolled am. But more than that,
the colleges really endow students
with an opportunity to be a contributor
to society and to be able to make a difference. And this is what I think Greg
believes in and stands for. And we’re delighted
this morning to be able to acknowledge the great
work that Greg is doing and has done and recognize him with
this a Lifelong Learning Award. Greg. [APPLAUSE] BRADLEY LANE: One more round
of applause for our recipients. Yeah, thank you. [APPLAUSE] It’s my pleasure now to
welcome our special guest who’s delivering our keynote this
year, Dr. Manuel Pastor. Dr. Pastor is a professor of
Sociology and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University
of Southern California. He currently directs
the US program for Environmental
and Regional Equity and co-directs the
Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. He holds an economics Ph.D. from
the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dr. Pastor’s research
has generally focused on issues of the
economic, environmental, and social conditions facing low
income, urban communities and the social movements that
seek to change those realities. He writes and speaks
nationally on issues including demographic change,
economic inequality, immigrant integration,
and community empowerment. Dr. Pastor holds
the Turpanjian Chair for Civil Society and
Social Change at USC and recently received the
Liberty Hill Foundation’s Wally Marx Change Maker of
the Year Award in 2012 for social justice
research partnerships with community organizations. Here to speak to us on just
economics, equity, prosperity, and the future of Seattle
is Dr. Manuel Pastor. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] MANUEL PASTOR: Thank you. It’s a pleasure to be with you. Let’s see if this is working. [INAUDIBLE] working. If it’s not, I can use this. It’s OK. Although I look more like
a rock star with this, so I was really getting into it. It’s on. So is that working? Let’s see whether this
is up and running. I would say no, wouldn’t you? JILL WAKEFIELD: Maybe
you could sing something. MANUEL PASTOR: So
I think you’ll be very pleased to know that I
am not the Chinese president and therefore not responsible
for your pastries arriving late today. I was asked to speak this
morning about a lot of things, actually. About demographic change
in Seattle and Washington in the United States. About the nature of our economic
system and the inequalities that it’s producing. About the role of the
community colleges in addressing both the new
demography in this changing economy. And if that wasn’t
enough, I was also asked to discuss
gentrification in Seattle and whether or not your
particular neighborhood was about to chase you right out. I was asked to provide
commentary about the Pope’s visit to the United States. [LAUGHTER] Including whether he would
inspire US Catholics to make significant change, which
would include Joe Biden running for President. John Boehner’s stopping that
whole weird suntan deal. And many of the rest of us
actually going to church. And then finally, I was asked
to comment on whether or not Ben Carson and Donald Trump
would decide to join together on a single ticket and campaign
for what they really believe, a deep suspicion of Mexican
Muslim providers of women’s health care. [LAUGHTER] [APPLAUSE] That’s a lot to talk
about in a short keynote. Or what we in Spanish
call a “keynotito.” Made short I think
because I think I originally had
half an hour, now I only have about 20 minutes. I’m going to get
you out on time. So let me do at least some
of what I was going to do. And before I get
started, I always like to let folks know that
while I’m talking my voice might break a little bit. You might think it’s
because I’m emotional being with you, particularly
on Chancellor Wakefield’s last convocation. It’s not. Although what could be
more inspiring than being with you this morning? It’s that I actually have
a speech disorder that’s called Spasmodic Dysphonia. Spasms around the voice box. Some of you may know
Diane Rehm on NPR has it, Bobby Kennedy
Jr., and now me. So that the voice might break. And I always like to
also reassure audiences that it does get treated once
a month, believe it or not, with Botox. Because that’s how we treat
everything in Los Angeles. It just seems to– [LAUGHTER] Really work for us. So for some of you the
happiest day of the year might be today, the convocation,
or Christmas or your birthday or the end of Ramadan, when
you can finally eat again. For someone like me, the
happiest day of the year, if the technology would
bring the PowerPoint up, is the day that the census
releases at statistics. [LAUGHTER] I mean, what could be better? And when the last major release
of the census statistics came, we saw that for the United
States as a whole to growth rate for Latinos in the
last decade was 43%. The growth rate for
Asian Americans, 43%. The growth rate for
African Americans, 11%, which is about
the national average. And the growth rate
for non-Hispanic whites only about 1%. And that’s a huge differences,
the 43% compared to 11 and 1, particularly compared to the 1. And it’s why when, for
example, Barack Obama got reelected with only
39% of the white vote and commentators on the news
were saying, oh my gosh, the country’s changed. The country’s changed. People like me were
saying, where were you for the last few
years when I was going around the country saying,
hey, the country’s changed. The country’s changed. What’s interesting
about these statistics and important for people to keep
in mind, although a little bit different in Seattle, as
we’ll see in a minute, is that the major–
you would think from the presidential
campaign right now that the major driver of
that demographic change was immigration. But that’s no longer true. Immigration into the
country has slowed down. The immigrants from Asia
are now pacing immigrants from Latin America. And net migration from Mexico,
our traditional largest sender, is 0. That is, there’s
as many Mexicans returning to Mexico as
coming to the United States. Now, what’s the reason for that? Some of it has to do with
increased border enforcement. A lot more people coming,
particularly people who are undocumented, or
simply visa over stayers came here perfectly legally. But another part of
it, and more important, is that the fertility rate
in Mexico has changed. So over the course of her
lifetime, 35 years ago, a woman in Mexico would
have five children. Now that fertility rate is 2.3. The fertility rate in
the United States is 1.7. As those come together,
less of a push factor. It’s no longer immigration. It’s the children of
immigrants driving that change. What’s that’s look
like in Washington? It’s been somewhat faster growth
for all of these categories. The green bars are what
happened in the ’00s. And for Seattle, even faster. Your Latino community grew
by 91%, the API community by 53%, the non-Hispanic
white community by only 1%. And this shows you
the contributors to growth in the Seattle
metropolitan area. So the gray bar, non-Hispanic
whites, the orange bars, people of color. You can see in the 1980s,
the contributions to growth were coming mainly from
non-Hispanic whites. You can see that by the
’90s, the main contributors to demographic growth in the
Seattle metropolitan area, people of color. And you can see by the ’00s
there’s an overwhelming contribution from people
of color relative to a net contribution of
non-Hispanic whites. America is changing
and Seattle is part of those metros
that are leading the way. Again, what’s driving us
is no longer immigration. It’s children. So this shows you what happened
in the between 2000 and 2010 to the number of young people by
demography in the United States as a whole. So for the non-Hispanic
white population, the number of young whites
in the US in that decade actually fell by 4.3 million. Now that does not mean that
4.3 million young white people died. [LAUGHTER] We would’ve noticed that. [LAUGHTER] It would have been
reported on Fox News. And blamed preemptively
on Obamacare. It’s just the
eliminating– What it does mean is that there’s less
people moving into one and two than are moving into 19 and 20. And so the net young
population falls. For African Americans,
that fell by 250,000. Some of that’s re-designation
into the multiracial category, the other category. But the young Latinos in the
country, up by 4.8 million. The young API, up
by about 800,000. So that’s the new America. And as we’ll see, it’s
also the new Seattle. In the new Seattle metro, you
could see the sharp decline in the number of young whites. Still increase, that’s an
unusual thing about Seattle, in the number of blacks. Now, that’s some increase in
the African American population. But as you well know better
than outsiders like me are attracting significant
share of African immigrants. And increasingly
that category black concludes Ethiopians
and Somalis and a number of others who bring their own
histories even as they wind up fitting into both the
US and African American histories and spaces. But growth, again, for Seattle,
which is on the left hand side, mostly from Latinos and
Asian Pacific Islanders. So what’s that look like going
forward for the United States as a whole? This is what we look like by
the year going after 2040, by the year 2043, 2044, we
will be a so-called majority minority country. Which is kind of a misnomer. Or as I like to think of it,
all minority all the time. Every group being a minority. So the majority of
people of color. By the year 2031 or 2032,
the majority of the workforce will be people of color. I didn’t say the majority
of young entrants into the workforce, but the
majority of the workforce, young people of color. And by the end of this decade,
the majority of young people will be people of color. What’s that look
like in Washington? In the state of Washington? By the way, pay attention. This is the US. This is the state of Washington. It’s not changing
demographically as fast as the rest
of the United States, but Seattle’s
changing more rapidly. So one of the mismatches
going on in Seattle is that the rest
of the state is not experiencing a demographic
change that the Seattle metro is experiencing. And that explains a little bit
of the mismatch politically in Seattle as well in terms
of what run state politics and what’s important
for your most important metropolitan area. Because Seattle, we got
majority of people of color probably around the
year 2035 or so. What’s driving change? Latinos and Asians,
nation’s again. This is a dot map. Follow the orange and sort
of purple or reddish dots. Those are the
Latinos and Asians. And you can see the spreading
out into the metropolitan area. We’ll get to that in a second. And let me just show you what
happening in the United States as a whole. Because one of the
things that happens, and I don’t think you would
think about this in Seattle, but it certainly happens
around the country, as that people when they
hear that what’s going on is that the US will become
majority people of color by the year 2043, 2044, they
imagine that all of that change is happening in California. That eventually California
will become 150% minority. Sort of super Latinos
crossing the Earth. [SPANISH] It’ll be
a dramatic moment. So this is what’s interesting. This is the United
States in 1980. And here the darker
the shade, the higher the percent people of color. And you can see that in
1980, the United States looked like most people
still think the US looks. That is, the sort of black
belt of the south heading up to DC, the heavily Latino areas
of the borderlands of Texas with Mexico, the Hispanic
and Native American areas of Arizona and New
Mexico and the sort of Native American areas
of the Dakotas as well. But note California. In California in
1980, the only county that was majority
people of color was Imperial County, the
county bordering Mexico. This is what the country
looked like in 1990. You can see the change
happening in California. In the year 2000. Watch that it’s still
happening in California but beginning to spread. By the year 2010. And here’s what we look
like going forward. 2020, 2030, 2040. So big change. And it’s happening everywhere. And one of the fascinating
things about this is that if you’ve
got some friends that are living in some
areas that don’t have a lot of folks of
color now, let them know, don’t worry. It’s coming to a
theater near you. [LAUGHTER] And interestingly, the
only kind of two sort of places that aren’t going
to experience a lot of change are the industrial
Midwest, which is not doing well economically,
and very lightly populated areas. What’s that look
like in Seattle? One of the fascinating
things about Seattle is it illustrates another
important geographic trend. And that geographic
trend is the following. The places that are
becoming the most diverse in the United States right now,
I mean, just like people think, well, all the demographic change
is happened in California, they think of the
demographic change as happening in central cities. You know how people
use that expression. They go, it’s an urban thing. By which they mean it’s
a black thing, right? They ought to just say
it’s a black thing. But they say it’s
an urban thing. So people think about
demographic changes happening in our central cities. But what’s going on is that the
demographic change is actually happening most dramatically
in America’s suburbs. And Seattle’s a perfect example. This is what you
look like in 1980. People of color concentrated
in the city of Seattle. This is in the year 2010. Do that again because I
like the noise you made. [LAUGHTER] And you can observe two things. One is the huge
diversity happening in the suburbs of Seattle. And the second is that the
city is actually whitening. The city is actually
one of the few places– I didn’t bring that map– where
the people of color population is on the decline. And why? We’ll see in a minute,
but you can see that the suburbs are important. The suburbs are important and
you draw from them as well as in the city because
they’re the places where this change is occurring. It’s the place where actually
poverty is on the rise the most dramatically. And it’s also the
places that tend not to have the social
services infrastructure, the civic infrastructure,
or the community organizing infrastructure for people
to find their voice. So why is that happening? You can see there’s more poverty
now in your southern suburbs than there is in your city. And then you can also
see here the orange darts are affordable housing units. The blue, the green dots are
where the low wage jobs are. The low wage jobs,
or low skill jobs, remain in the city
for the most part, but that housing is
increasingly in the suburbs. Everybody is celebrating
the come back of the city, but the come back
of the city has resulted in some displacement
of its long time residents. I’m going to jump
over most of this to move into the
inequality issue, because I’m
conscious of the fact that we need to end on time
and we started a bit late. Well, you don’t tell an
academic to take his time. [LAUGHTER] Because then I’ll
start reviewing like what I talked about
in my dissertation, which was really great by the way. [LAUGHTER] So Seattle’s like another
example of demographic change. But it’s also an example of
a big phenomena happening in the United States
around income inequality. This shows you what
the share of income is that’s going to the top 1%. That’s the blue line. And you can see that
there’s two peaks in terms of the share of income
going to the top 1% over the last basically century. One is 1928, the year before the
Great Depression, and the other is 2007, the year before
the great recession. That is, in both cases,
those economic difficulties were triggered by growing
inequality of income. One of the reasons why we
should be concerned about this. But you can see as well
that the share of income going to the top 1%
to 5%, the red line, has been in a steady rise. And also the top 5% to 10%. Not doing as well as the
top 1%, but also going up. And one of the
things that’s going on the conversation
around inequality is a bit of a confusion. Because what’s going on for
the top 1% is excess CEO pay. In the 1960s, Chief
Executive Officers used to take 20 to 30 times the
wage of their average employee. Now chief executive officers
make 350 times the wage of their average employee. It would be difficult
argue that they’re 10 to 15 times more productive
than they used to be. But they have been
able to pull off that level of pay,
which has a lot to do with the way in which
boardrooms have changed. Has a lot to do with
tax structure too. But one of the confusions that
we’ve got in our conversation is that what’s going on
for the top 1% is an issue and it’s an issue that needs
to be tackled around CEO pay, around taxes, around
access financialization. But there’s also a
growing gap, and you can see it in the
Seattle case, just for people who are workers. So this is earned income
for full time workers at the 90th percentile of
the income distribution, the 80th percentile,
the median, 50th, the 20th percentile, and then
also the 10th percentile. The gray bars are
the United States. And what you’ll notice
about the United States is that this is not the top 1%. These are sort of people
who are upper middle class at the 90th percentile. They’ve gained 15% in their
income between 1980 and 2010, while those at the
bottom 20% have lost 11%. But in Seattle, the change
in distribution of income is even worse. Those at the 90th
and 80th percentile have a huge gains
in their income. Those at the 10th percentile,
even more significant drops than in the
country as a whole. So just as you are in
some sense part of America fast forward with respect
to demographic change, you’re part of America
fast forward with regard to this growing
income inequality. You can see that it has
a racial aspect to it. This is the percent
of the population living below 150% of the federal
poverty line for Seattle. And you can see that for
African Americans and Latinos, huge significant
differences between what’s going on for whites and for
African Americans and Latinos. Also the Asian Pacific
Islander population. People don’t realize that it’s
a relatively poor population, partly because median household
income for APIs is higher. But poverty rates
are higher as well. It’s a bifurcated community,
with some folks doing very well, some folks lagging. I’m going to jump over this. So but what the
challenges, I think, is it this is something
that could wind up getting worse moving forward. This is for Seattle. And it does something I think
that’s quite interesting. It breaks up your
population by ethnicity. This is for people
between the age 25 and 64. And asks the question,
who has an AA or better? And so it’s not just
ethnicity, but also whether or not they
were born in Washington, you’re a homegrown
population, whether or not they’re US born but they
migrated into Seattle, or whether or not
they’re foreign born. If you look for
each and every one of these groups in particular,
your African American population, for both your
whites and your African American population, your
homegrown Seattle bred population
is not as educated as the people who are moving in. And therefore not
as likely to take the jobs of the future
that are going to be there. This is a significant problem. You have a thing,
it’s known in Colorado as the Colorado paradox. And the Colorado
paradox is they wind up looking a lot better because
a lot of young people move there so they can ski. And as a result, they bring
a more highly educated populations that winds
up masking what’s going on for the home grown. You’ve got the same
problem, except people are attracted here by cappuccinos. [LAUGHTER] And what it winds up doing is
you get a homegrown population that’s poorly served. So the task for the
Seattle Community Colleges moving forward is really clear. You on the one hand
have to make sure that for the folks who are coming
from the state and pre-training and for the immigrants
who are coming here that this is a vital institution
for their economic advancement, but that you don’t wind up
leaving behind the people who have spent their entire
life growing up here. And again, I’m
conscious of the time. So what I’m going to do is
say why this is so urgent now and then provide a stirring
and emotional conclusion. [LAUGHTER] So this is one of
my favorite graphs. There’s two reasons. One, of course, is
because it’s animated and that’s just totally cool. The second is because
of the story it tells. This is something
called an age pyramid. And what an age
pyramid does is it tries to array the
population by their age. So the bottom is people
under the age of five and then sort of on up. And you can see that in
1950 we had an age permit. Lots of kids, thinning
out through the middle, and then when you get to the
older ages, less and less. We pass on. But what you can also see is
that as you move from 1950 to the year 2060, the US is
moving from an age pyramid to an age cylinder. Less young people,
less immigrants filling in the middle,
more old people surviving. This is a huge challenge. Because what it means is that
everyone who’s in the workforce has to be far more
productive than they ever were because they’ll
be supporting a lot more people like me who
will be retired and hoping they’re doing well. And this is a sweet spot
for the community colleges in terms of educating people,
making them more productive. And meaning that we need now to
address our inequality crisis and we need to address
our demographic change and possibilities to make
sure that this next America is as productive as it can be. So it’s a challenge
for all of us. And in the space
that we might think of as just economics
or just growth, where we take the concerns
of inequality seriously and try to channel
them to economic growth, the community colleges are
very much a sweet spot. They’re a place that is helping
to empower the workforce. But they’re also a place
that’s helping to craft a better and different economy. Because when you’re
supporting the health care industry not simply by
training people to work into it by creating a workforce
feeder system that makes sure that health care can
thrive, that’s important. When you’re doing the
work that makes sure that advanced
manufacturing can actually accompany software
programming and we can bring some of those jobs
back into the United States. When you’re doing to work so
that you understand that people can design and code at
sorts of different levels and feed into the
industry, that’s helping drive an economy that
could make things move forward. And in doing that work,
what we need to realize is that– I’ll just move to
this– that we need really fundamentally look at our
work in a different way and look at our work in
terms of helping students. beat the odds that
are against them. But also, helping students
become change agents to change the odds that they face. And addressing that, and closing
on that, one of the reasons why I have a sweet spot
for community colleges will become obvious in a second. Have to do with a story. Sort of my story, but in
fact a story like many, that begins a
generation before me with my dad, who arrived
in the United States the 1930s with papers
that were imperfect. When World War II
came, he was given a choice between being
deported or joining the US Army to fight in Europe. And he literally, this is
the truth, couldn’t decide. So he gave a penny to my cousin
Carlitos, who flipped it. And my dad and the
penny went to the war. Both came back sage. And a generation later,
his son is an endowed chair full professor at the University
of Southern California. [APPLAUSE] And I always like to tell
people that’s a great story. That’s an American story. And it’s the wrong story. It’s the wrong story,
at least told that way. Because when it’s told that
way, what it makes it sound like is the story of individuals. That’s important. My dad’s desires to get
ahead, his own hard work, my own hard work. But in the 1930s when
my dad had no papers, he had a union that
defended his rights at work. [APPLAUSE] With that opportunity
to join the army, he found his own
private Dream Act. A way to find a path to
citizenship and for immigrants without papers to contribute. I mean, that deserves
applause for sure. [APPLAUSE] When he came back from the
war, there was a GI bill. And that GI bill meant that
he, a guy with a sixth grade education, could go to LA
Trade Tech, a community college in downtown Los Angeles,
and learn about electricity. And by learning
about electricity, he was able to move from being
a janitor to being an air conditioner repairman. And my family was able
to move from being poor to being working class. And because of that GI
bill he bought a house in La Puente, an entering
suburb Los Angeles, and got his own piece, our own
piece of the American dream. And we went to public schools
because they were decent and people were
investing in them. And when it came time
to go to college, there was affirmative action to
take a chance on a kid like me but it’s not that the
typical profile of who was supposed to go to college. And that, I would submit to
you, that’s the American story. [APPLAUSE] It is the story of
individuals, because we know that people have to step
up and take care of their selves and move themselves forward. But we also know that it’s a
story of the public policies and public institutions
we put in place, things that represent
workers’ rights, things that provide immigrants
a path to get ahead, community colleges that
provide a platform for folks to make it, mortgage
systems that make it possible for people
to actually buy instead of be foreclosed on. And it’s not just those
public institutions. It’s the social movements
that make those things happen. It’s the veterans movement that
made a GI bill come to pass, the education advocates
that fought hard for public schools and community
colleges, the civil rights movement to make sure that
affirmative action was in place, the labor movement
that protected workers’ rights. That’s the American story. It’s individuals,
it’s institutions, and it’s movements. And if you really
want to make sure that your students
succeed, it’s important that they learn that
they are not simply clients to the community
college system. They are constituents
and change makers. And the only way we make
sure that we all thrive is if we make sure
that we all thrive. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] BRADLEY LANE: Thank
you, Dr. Pastor, for that rich conversation,
just getting it started. And I know many of you will want
that conversation to continue. So I just want to give
you some information about the breakout sessions
that are about to happen. One of them is with Dr.
Pastor in this very room right after conversations for
just economics in Seattle. So I invite you to
stay and continue to learn and to speak with him. We have other breakout sessions
on mindfulness practice, stress reduction, universal
design strategies, the faculty voices project,
the league for innovation. We even have a ghost tour
of Seattle Central College. You can find the locations for
those sessions in your programs along with the room numbers. And again, if you need any
help, look for volunteers with the orange lanyards. I want to thank you for
being here this morning. And I want to invite
you as well to join Chancellor Wakefield, North
Seattle President Warren Brown, Seattle Central Interim
President Sheila Edwards Lange, South Seattle
President Gary Oertli, for an
informal lunch panel that’s going to happen
today where they will answer questions that
have been submitted around the district
ahead of time. And that’s happening in the
main building across the street, the Broadway Edison building. It seems like in
the restaurant space that we have on
the second floor. Also, you can spend time
after the breakout sessions today just mixing and
mingling with colleagues. Little bit of logistical
data, the atrium where the fountain is
in the Broadway Edison building, where the working
fountain is– The Tsutakawa Fountain. That’s where you’ll
pick up lunch. It’s open for
mixing and mingling. And then have lunch
with your colleagues, attend the lunch panel. The lunch today is
graciously sponsored by our campus bookstores,
operated by Barnes and Noble College. So I want to thank
you for being here. I want to send out best
wishes for a great new year. And happy fall
quarter, everyone. Thanks for coming. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC PLAYING]