Our graduates discuss their time at the Exeter Law School

Our graduates discuss their time at the Exeter Law School

October 26, 2019 1 By Stanley Isaacs


So if I was starting at Exeter again I
would get involved with extracurricular activities from day one.
I’ve been very involved with mooting and debating and bar trips in my final
year and I didn’t really notice that those things were available to me in my
first year because of the huge transition to university in itself. So,
yes I would start with those extracurriculars in my first year if I
was doing it again. If I could go back in time start my whole experience again, I
would ensure that I would be really organised and make sure that I’m
applying for training contracts from my second year. To do that I would need
to have a strong 2:1, so that always a priority for me. I would ensure that
I’m also doing the best that I can to get involved with for the Bracton Law Societies’ opportunities. Not only do they help you make friends on your course and
feel more comfortable, but they also have a lot of pro bono opportunities that you
can get involved with and they look absolutely fantastic on your CV. If I had
to do anything differently, I think I would have probably had more engagement
with the law school academics from a much earlier time. So I personally only
started to get to know the staff and academics in the law school in my second or
third year and I think which was one of the most memorable experiences that I
had here. They are extremely friendly, they give really good tips and they give you a
very good insight into what the law is and what the practice of the
law is as well. Yeah I would definitely be more engaged with the law school from
an earlier time. So go to your lectures and go to your
seminars and my biggest tip would be to get into a good routine with your
work and your social life. Make sure you have a good balance but at the end
of the day, there really is no substitution for hard work. Everyone
is different, so everyone works in a different way. Originally before I came
to university I would find that the best way for me to revise would be to
gain more information from wider reading but, I would absolutely recommend that
people stick to the syllabus it’s there for a reason. The reading that has been
recommended by the lecturers, is the reading that they would prefer you to
read and there’s the reason why it has been recommended. Absolutely ensure
that you know everything inside out in the syllabus and also, don’t find the
lecturers intimidating. I know they’re absolutely fantastic and they’re superb
at what they do so they come across as really intellectual, which they
are, but they do want to help you. So no question is too stupid to ask, so just
make sure that you ask everything you need to. I think my biggest tip for future law
students would be to understand that quality is always more important than
quantity. In your time at law school you will meet a lot of friends who will be studying many hours in the library or, many people will tell you
that you have to ensure that you put in four or five hours after every lecture
to catch up on on everything. Personally I didn’t do any of that. I just ensured
that every time I studied or I looked into my books, they were all
quality time. So I ensured that I understood what I was reading, I asked
questions about them, so I didn’t have to go back to them two or three times. So
it’s all about efficiency rather than just looking at the books and putting in
the hours just for the sake of it, so I think that’s probably my biggest tip. The thing I’ve enjoyed most about
studying is who I have met through my studies. I made some really great
friends in Exeter in the law school and, meeting the lecturers who were always
willing to help has been great. I have enjoyed various things about studying.
I’m quite passionate about law, I find it very interesting so that’s a given, but
my whole experience at university, one of the biggest things for me has been how much of a close-knit community it is. When you originally come here you
think.. oh my god I’m a small fish in a big pond and I don’t know anyone… but after a
few months you find that you have a lot of friends on your course, everyone
is here to support you. So I think that was that’s one of the biggest advantages
to me at the University of Exeter, is how much of a close-knit community it is. I think
what I’ve enjoyed most about studying the law, simply put is the law itself.
Most people think of the law as a very boring, very dry, very complicated thing
but it doesn’t have to be that way. I think as a student you have to be
open-minded, be inquisitive, try to explore the law and try to explore what
it actually means. Rather than just to study because you are taught to study.
I think that’s probably what I enjoyed the most, trying to find out more about
what the law means? Obviously through this process, I managed to get
quite a lot of good insights and built really good relationships with my teachers and
lecturers as well. I think this is what I enjoyed the most.