OER at Two Top Transfer Schools: Student Expectations at Pierce College and TCC

OER at Two Top Transfer Schools: Student Expectations at Pierce College and TCC

August 15, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Quill West: So, um, first, it’s not like I think I need a mic to talk to all of you but this is being recorded, so, as you are joining us just know that you are all being recorded or we’re being recorded. If you say any nasty words it might get picked up, but feel free to say them anyway. [laughing] So as Jennifer said, I’m –or as, I’m sorry, Sarah said– I’m Quill West. I’m the Open Education Project Manager at Pierce College. So Pierce is a three college district, um which means– or it’s a two college district and a third site of education. So what that means is that, um, we kind of operate the campuses independently. I don’t know how aware people are of this, but they have their own structures that come together to do some things. Um, like accreditation and most actually of our campus change initiatives happen as a cooperative group. This student count was our student count this quarter. So this is how many students are currently enrolled at Pierce College head count. Almost 60 percent, 58.9 percent, of our students plan on transferring and a quite a few of them, I don’t have an exact count, but quite a few of them plan on coming to the Universities of Washington one way or another. Um, they– a big part of that enrollment by the way is dual enrollment. Those are Running- Start students. Right now, the enrollment of Running- Start students at Pierce College is outpacing other student enrollments. Twenty- three percent of our students are eligible for Pell Grants. And, 62.7 percent of them are first generation college students and that’s really important when we talk about open education resources because for a number of reasons. The biggest reason is most of these students have not experienced, have not had family experience, the need to purchase textbooks on top of the need to pay for tuition. So, they often plan for the cost of tuition and forget about the other cost that come with coming to college. So, textbooks are kind of jarring for the first time for these students. They are also very used to books not costing as much as textbooks costs. And they don’t understand, and most students don’t understand the reason why there’s a difference in the cost of a textbook versus the cost of their favorite paperback novel. And then, it’s not a giant group. A 38 percent is actually quite a big population of students of color or who identify as students of color. And one of the things that our open education project is really really invested in is equity and diversity in our education because we’re trying to close achievement gaps. And Pierce has been winning awards for our work on student completion recently so we’re an Achieving the Dream college and we’re a Leah Meyer Adult Education Award winner. And that’s important just from the perspective of we have been examining our data a lot in the last couple of years and trying to figure out how we can get students to graduate. And part of that is connecting– it’s Leah Austin Meyer I’m sorry– um, it’s partially our work it really has been around, how do we close achievement gaps? And right now we don’t have the magic bullet but I’m hoping that– because there isn’t one– but I’m really hoping that open education is one of our major changes that can help meet that gap. Okay so, Pierce has been doing open education for, um, since 2014 when I came to Pierce College so, Pierce has actually been doing open education for a lot longer than that. I don’t know the start date for Math AS which is WAMAP, some faculty might recognize that name, or My Open Math, if you happen to be somebody who does it in the not Washington State space. WAMAP is a math homework online system that was developed by faculty in Washington State, but the lead faculty member on that is at Pierce College, his name is David Lippman. And talk about movers and shakers, the first time I went to a conference, an open education conference with David Lippman, was like travelling with a rock star. Everywhere I went people knew who he was. It was my first ever open education conference, it was kind of great. [laughing] So, David has been doing– and our math department have been adopting open education for, since I think 2007, so they had a really strong grounding. The faculty were really interested in extending this across the institution but they didn’t know how. Um, and the administration bought on in the way of investing money and time behind it. Just around 2014, after they had a proof of concept outside of math. So we had some proof of concept from an Oceanography class and from some History courses. They said, “Oh this is kind of working.” And the faculty kept saying, “This is one of the ways we’re gonna close this gap.” And so, the administration said “Let’s put some time and money behind it.” Which is when they hired me! So I started in 2014 and my first charge at Pierce College was to create an Open Education Degree pathway. Because, it was partially to increase enrollment at our Joint Base Lewis- McChord site. That’s actually where we do education on location at Joint Base Lewis- McChord. So, most of that program services students who are in the military or are affiliated with the military in some way. It’s like 30 percent active duty, 30 percent no- longer active duty veteran and 30 percent family members. And then a smattering of people from the community who actually go or take classes online through JBLM. So, we launched that degree a year early in Fall of 2015. So we expected it would take us two years. We launched it in a year with a very– like, when I say pathway, there were seventeen courses. That’s what you need to earn a transfer degree at Pierce College and you got on that pathway and you took the classes in it and you never had to pay for textbooks as long as you stay in on that pathway. Now, we offer about 56 different courses that are Open courses at JBLM. Both online and face to face. It’s still a fairly narrow pathway and that is by design. I don’t wanna do all the courses at JBLM and the reason why is because too much choice– it’s kind of all the pathways research that’s coming out right now– too much choice is too much confusion in terms of advising. But also because there is one of me and most of the faculty at Joint Base Lewis- McChord are per ten faculty members. which means, they’re kind of scattered all over the place. And for the first year doing this project I met with faculty in the weirdest places. I mean, really, in McDonald’s one day we designed an Open course. It was great. It was like, “Let’s go to one of the most commercial places that I can think of and design a course completely without any commercial materials in it, go!” [laughing] It was really fun. So we launched POP, now we’re working on our second two degrees. So, we’re working on the Pre- Nursing Degree which feeds into Allied Health. Our goal there is to have all of the prereqs for Allied Health courses completed. And we’re extending our AADTA which is the direct transfer one that probably most of the advisors at UWT are familiar with. It comes here. We’re working on extending that to both Puyallup and Fort Steilacoom in face to face and online classes so that students will have choice throughout the district. So, those are the two big initiatives I’m working on right now. We’re hoping to launch that in Fall of 2018. It’s going a little slower than the first degree went because I’m working with a faculty that is much bigger. At Joint Base Lewis- McChord where we have about 1,500 students, you can offer one section and say, “Look we’re open”. [laughing] You cannot do that when you’re serving 10,000 students a quarter. You kind of have to go “Okay, we need at least, on my rule is, we have to have at least two sections per campus and then two online.” To say the classes, to say we have an Open pathway in that area. Because one of the issues I think we run into with big institutions is, or mid- size institutions, is that if we’re not giving enough choice, then it’s not an Open pathway cause’ the first thirty students to enroll get that course and everybody else is out of luck. And that is not fair to the students who are really counting on not paying for textbooks for a quarter. So my goal is actually to make it so the students can strategize when they don’t need classes with textbooks and when they can take a class with a textbook. So that they can decide how to spend their money and where they want to spend their money and when they can spend their money on textbooks. Okay so, quick stats. I don’t think I need to read this to you. But you might be curious to see what a student’s experience is so, we actually have a video. We hope we have a video. [laughing] These are students at Joint Base Lewis- McChord who are taking one of our first Open courses in Oceanography. They happen to be on a lab experience and I went and found them because– so the reason why they’re kinda– [laughing] they’re wearing their wading suits, um, their rubber wading boots cause they were out in the water. Part of the reason why is because there’s all kinds of special permissions you need to film students on a military base. So I have to jump in here cause the students kept saying how much easier their POP class was and I wanna point out, this is an Oceanography class. It’s a hybrid class. They meet with their instructor one time a week. And usually it’s to do a lab like that one. Um, the materials that they are referring to are Open Access Journal articles. We are not taking about, um, we’ve dumbed down the reading for these students. We’ve actually elevated the amount of research and the level of reading difficulty that they’re doing. They just aren’t as aware of how difficult of what we’re asking– and not even that they’re not aware! They know, they know how hard the class is. What they’re not feeling is like, the readings that they’re doing don’t apply in the field that they’re studying. And again, these students are not, most of them are not, going to go into marine biology. One of them is a performance major and two of them are business majors. Jennifer Snoek Brown: Alright, well thank you Quill. Now some fast facts about Tacoma Community College. We’re at around 14,000 students per year. Interesting to know that majority of our students are full- time, which surprised me when I joined TCC, um this is my second year at TCC. Almost half receive some kind of financial aid so it is definitely a barrier. Textbook costs are definitely an issue and often it’s the delay of financial aid when it comes to textbooks. Umm, 41 percent, just a little bit higher, it’s pretty similar to Pierce, self- identify as students of color and 62 percent plan to transfer. I don’t know how many plan to transfer to UW Tacoma but I know it’s a sizable number. But, uh, definitely over 60 percent do plan on transferring and complete some kind of degree and transfer on. So our timeline starts with Quill, which is so awesome. I mean, just the depth of experience i this region is pretty phenomenal. So in Spring, I believe, may have those right cause you start in 2012, right? 2011? Er something like that, around that time. Around that time cause we’re a few years in now. So what’s interesting about the TCC journey to open is that it really began with the students because our Associated Student Government, that’s the ACASTCC there, they voted to fund OER project proposal. So they devoted half the money, the college matched it and then Quill was hired as a Project Coordinator. I think it just goes to show our students are really really invested in this and they wanted to literally invest in this. And then, for three years and then Quill joined Pierce. Um, which is fantastic for Pierce. So we had, um, so three solid years, three solid years of faculty work converting to open with Quill and three solid years of assessment and all of that that went into it. So in that gap year between when Quill joined Pierce and before our fantastic instructional designer and OER coordinator Christie Fierro was hired, there was no one kind of running the ship. But because Quill had begun this really intense and deep and meaningful work with faculty to transition to open, that work continued. So faculty were still working on these projects, still starting to convert, continuing to convert, even with no one officially leading the ship. So I think that just goes to show, like, even once you start a little bit, you get invested and you want to continue that work. So, I think again just we are so grateful for Quill’s leadership right at the beginning cause it was really strong leadership. And then, a steering group formed in spring 2016 and developed an Open Education plan for the campus with a successful goals. We’re continuing that work. And then I was hired officially in the spring of 2016. I didn’t start until fall of 2016, so I’m starting my second year at TCC and it is an– it’s interesting cause I’m joining a team that’s already been there. Right? So I think that’s really been official. I’m one of a team that works on OER. We’ve got Christie here, our Instructional OER Designer and OER Coordinator. She’s part of E- Learning. So E- Learning Team is there to provide support for all the little things that go with converting to Open. Like making the accessible and thinking about instructional design. I’m like the research support person as well in the library role and I found that when a faculty member wants to talk about OER, we start talking about the library and how to better use library resources as well. So it’s really just a win- win situation. So quick stats from TCC. This past year, because we have started coding our classes in CTC Link. I don’t know if y’all have heard of CTC Link. [Sighing] Oh thank goodness y’all aren’t a part of it. [laughing] But it’s a new people software– yeah, I see some, yeah. It’s a challenge, it’s an opportunity. Right? To know how to serve our students better. The dream is good for us all to be on the same people soft system. But we’re one of the ones who started piloting that. But in that system we’ve, I’ve, worked out a way to code the classes that are using OER and/ or at low costs. So that’s a separate tag where it’s less than 40 dollars for the cost of textbook materials. So in this past year, we have helped students save 1.3 million in textbook savings just from the courses that have been labelled as OER or no textbook to purchase. That’s 3.5 million in savings from the beginning from when Quill began the work in 2012 up until now, so we’re increasing those savings every year. We have found with working with our research, Department of Research and Institute of Research, that forty percent of students at TCC have taken an OER class, at least one, OER class. And it’s interesting, this one gets a little bit tricky. I do have some stats that’s written down here just in case. Cause’ I have some additional stats that didn’t make it to the slide. In 2015- 16, it’s interesting. So, forty percent of students have taken at least one OER class, right? But those students now, then account, for forty- seven percent of S.A.I. That’s Student Achievement Indicator. So it’s a way to track students’ success. So completion points with that student. Completion points, yeah. It’s tied to funding, yes. Like how can you actually prove that students are being successful. So that’s where this S.A.I– and I’ve always wanted to S.I.A, but its S.A.I, Student Achievement Initiative points. So there’s a higher percentage of students completing these points. So what that says to us is, the preliminary data, we need to tease it out, but preliminary data is showing us that OER is contributing, measurably contributing, to student success. We’re really pleased that these preliminary data points, we wanna tease that out further, because the better we code classes the better we can track these points and when we also want to continue, we want to start tracking things like drop rates. Because that is also tied to funding and financial aid. So does OER have a positive effect on, maybe, lessening drop rates of courses. So that’s one thing we want to look into. And just this morning, I looked at our course catalog to see what were the stats on the courses that were relatable to OER and to low cost. So combined. Both categories. Either forty dollars or below, that’s the low cost in OER, um, this quarter, so fall 2017. TCC has 154 sections. Which comprise 62 different classes, so multiple sections of the same classes. And so if we estimate 25 students per class, that’s a 3,800, almost 4,000 students conservative estimate who are benefitting just this quarter from OER classes. the better we get at coding, I think those numbers are going to increase as well. So this is effecting a lot of students. Working with TCC students, cause they were the beginning, right? They actually propelled this ship forward. We’re still working a lot with our ASTCC, our student government. But, you know, we’re a community college. we have a lot of turn- over, right? We have to consistently be in touch with our student government. This past quarter, cause they all kind of get together, like, “Here’s our new leadership team.” Right? And, “Let’s identify goals we want to do.” And all of that. Our Library Director, Candice Watkins, she met with them to talk about the library but also to talk about OER because she is one of the members on the OER steering group as well for our campus and is instrumental in supporting OER in Open culture. So she introduced them to OER, like the stat I just showed you, like, hey we’re saving this money and you know, only a couple students knew what it was. Because it’s — so it’s something we have to keep talking about with our students, okay? It’s like, let’s discuss this again. Look at this history that the student government has in being leaders in this. Cause’ we can’t assume that they automatically know. They get the concept pretty quickly. They’re like “Oh, this is awesome.” Right? “We want to know more about it.” Because you don’t just come in– we’re also looking at opportunities with our website. We’re going through website redesign. How can we bring out this even more? Like, so it’s not just us talking, “Hey did you know about this?” So that maybe there’s some self- discovery there. And we’re talking with marketing. This could be a recruiting tool and a retention tool like, “Hey look at this savings you can do, look at this legacy of student leadership in this way and here’s how you can take it with you.” You know? Know how to talk about it. Know how to ask for it. So for example, we’ve worked with them and with E- Learning and student government to put together a video, like, here’s how to look for Open or Low- cost courses and then how do we get that out to students. How does the student government, how can they help with that. Can we put it on Canvas as a video? Can we send it out through our portal with the students. So, really trying to brainstorm ways to get that out students and also, how can we collaborate even further? And, yeup. Let’s hear from a TCC student. This videos is a few years old and this student, I think, was Christie’s student. Yeah. Christie Fierro’s student. This is Joanne Eller. [Music Intro] Joanne Eller: To go back to school was something that was very important for me to do. I would have to say that the cost of the books. Some of them have shocked me and I can say that for students that are working part- time that this would be a struggle and even to buy used or to rent it’s still very expensive. That was not something I really figured into my budget and if I have to I will buy the book. But then the cost is so high and the re-sale is such a core turn- around for me to sell my books at the end of the quarter. It’s just not worth it. It was a relief. For one thing, I didn’t have to stand in line at the bookstore. That’s always daunting. You get there and the line goes all the way out the bookstore through the cafeteria. It’s– and you’re on a time crunch. It’s just is always a surprise. The line is always there and I was glad because that money now, instead of going to a book, can go to my education, which I would prefer. Because education is very expensive. I feel that there’s a lot of political influence in the textbook. I fully believe that our textbooks are policed. I think that they tell us what they want us to believe and what they want us to know. And I think this has been going on for a long time and I think it needs to stop. Having the ability to go to other resources is huge. I don’t think students should be stuck with just one form of education. So I think that it’s much more empowering and a greater learning tool for students to be able to go to a variety of sources. If you have only just one, you don’t know if what you’re getting is valid. And I also think it discourages others from sharing their thoughts on an electronic form that we can all have access to. So I think that both ends are– I think you’re closing both ends. If you don’t have this wide base of access to knowledge, you are closing the door to people that are looking for knowledge and you are closing the door for people who are trying to get the knowledge out there. What I found through this process of participating in this OER, um, it was very empowering for me and something that I have not thought about. I think I can speak for a lot of people. When you are in the classroom you’re thinking about time constraints. You’re thinking about, um, how or what is the flavor that the professor wants. How am I supposed to answer this? By writing, by looking at the topic, the political science topic, by look at that and knowing that I was going to put something on paper that other people are going to read changed my viewpoint in how I was interpreting the material and how I was going to reprocess that material in my own words unto paper. You’re doing the same thing from the textbook, you’re reading and then you’re answering the question that’s posed to you from the professor. But, when you are doing it for a different end result, the way you process the information and the way you put it down on paper is completely different. I think the learning process is far more power. I found that I had more interest. I found that I retained the material and it became more important to me. I think that personal thing is something that students will find from that switch from the textbook and the regular old routine that’s been going on for decades when you switch over to this, when you’re actually participating you process it different and it becomes more of a personal thing. I think it changes how people will communicate with each other. It’s a powerful tool and I think it’s something that needs to take place in the colleges all over. I think people will find then students are coming out of the colleges more engaged in their personal lives and in the lives at work and a public. I think it changes everything. [Increasing music] Quill West: So, um, I wanna just mention a couple of things that I think are really important in terms of thinking about how our students relate to OER and institutions and what that means for the students that transfer. And then I’ll talk about this slide. [Laughing] So, um, Jennifer mentioned that at TCC they already label which courses in their catalog, in their schedule, our OER courses. Or trying, yeah. We’re trying to do the same thing at Pierce College. So, we’re using what I call the Legacy System. Which means the system that was put in place in the 90’s to track our courses. But we’re trying to find a way for us to communicate to our students in advance which courses are open and which are not. Um, and once we are able to do that, students are gonna expect it. So I think it’s something that hopefully our area institutions are all thinking about, how can we do this. Um, and trying to get ahead of that conversation. And then the other part is– I noticed last year because I went to speak with the legislature last year– that students, students in the community in technical colleges had a OER as a, um, an initiative for how they talk to the legislature for our Associative Student Government as a group and they’ve talked to the legislature. They’ve had OER on their agenda for the last three years. It’s on this year. And I happened to notice that it has moved over into the student bodies of the public universities. So I think it’s really important to note that, you know that’s partially because some of our students are becoming your students, but it’s also because textbook cost has become an issue for students for a long time. We all know that. It was probably a problem for some of us, right? I know it was for me and the advocacy work around open education at the national and international levels are growing. So I think it’s really important for us to think about how our students are gonna approach this conversations with us because they’re advocating at the legislature. And all the legislature can do is either fund it or mandate it. And we don’t want mandation. We definitely don’t want them to mandate it to our faculty because that doesn’t work. [Laughing] Um, we’ve learned already that telling somebody you have to do something is a great way for them to try to find ways for them to wiggle around how to do it. [Laughing] It should, we should always be a choice. Partially because I’m always telling my students when they want to go advocate for there should be law about this particular class being open, I always kind of have to say, “Would you rather invest in a textbook or take a class that a teacher’s not passionate about and not pass it because the teacher’s not passionate and can’t share that passion with you?” Because that’s what could happen. So, it’s much more effective if it’s a choice. Okay so, I mentioned the achievement gap and I wanna talk about, a little bit now, I kind of want transition partially from what Joann was saying in the video where she was describing, what she didn’t come out and say, was that she was describing and assignment that asked her to contribute her work from her class, back to kind of the commons, back to the institution in a way of sharing her work. It’s called Open Pedagogy depending on where you’re standing if you happened to read the blogs its Open Education practice or OER Enabled Pedagogy if you are a follower of David Wiley. And I wanna talk a little bit about how we’re describing that at Pierce– and a little bit, a tiny bit, I’m gonna talk like I still am standing at TCC and Jennifer’s gonna interrupt me. [laughing] I teach at TCC so I’m gonna pretend like I can talk about Open Pedagogy there because I use it in my teaching. [Laughing] Okay. So the first thing I’m showing you is a definition of what we mean by Open Education resources. This definition comes from David Wiley. It’s the five R’s. You can see them listed there. And if you advance for me. I like to think about the five R’s in a couple of different ways. I really think of the three big ones that our students come to first are the Consumption R’s. They’re the ways that we distribute materials and that they interact with them. And actually from the student’s perspective, like, this is what’s important about Open Education Resources. Can I Reuse it? Can somebody give it to me for free? And Can I keep it if I want to? And so that’s what we tend to think about when we think about how do we deliver materials and we do need to think about those sides. But there’s also the used side. Oh yeah, okay. Yeah, that’s fine. No you’re fine. They’re also, those are the ones associated with class which is really [Inaudible] The two R’s that I tend to talk about faculty are the ones around creation of materials and revise and remix because this is the one where we get to change the materials to match our learning outcomes and to match what we really want our students to be doing in our classes. Rather than buying the textbook that’s written for the middle market, because that’s where textbooks are written. Most commercial textbooks at the general ed. college level are written for the middle market. Well, we don’t teach to the middle market, we teach to our students. Those are the people in our classroom, those are the people who have to serve in our communities, we hope, when they graduate, right? Our job is to help them be better citizens. That’s what education is for so, if we want that, how do we design that around what we do in Washington State or in our region or in our industry in our part of the world. We wanna be able to Revise and Remix. It’s all about customization, we can switch over now. Yes, please do! Jennifer Snoek Brown: I just wanna point out, like, I think is a really good illustration of what the students are looking for, right, and what kind of appeals to faculty. But these bits right here, the benefits that quill just described, tailoring it to that class or to those students. That was what came out in the Pierce college student interview. That was one of the student’s, like, when the student says, “Oh everything is relevant. It’s not just everything in this textbook, one size fits all, this is really speaking to us.” So even though it kind of starts out with those other ones about costs, students are picking up on these extra benefits as well. Quill West: I know. I love the part where when they start talking about OER, they become better advocates of their own educational needs. This again is describing the why of the two first, the Revise and Remix R’s. We’ll go ahead and move forward. So, here’s the thing. Where that stops for me. Learners aren’t sponges. They’re not. We know this. There’s all kinds of educational theories out there that says that just absorbing information, no matter how that information is packaged, is not the way, the most effective way to learn that information. That’s why every student that I’ve ever talked to says that they’re a tactile learner. Like if you asked them– and I teach college success at Pierce College and every quarter we ask the students to describe themselves as a learner and every quarter, two- thirds, maybe more, of my class says that they’re tactile learners. I’m like, that is a myth! [laughing] Okay. Because we’re taught to learn by doing but really what we’re taught at how we learn is by experiences. Experience is the most important thing about learning. If you don’t experience something. If you can’t tie it to your previous experience and future experience and current experiences, you will not remember it. It’s why people forget languages when they don’t use them. Okay, let’s go ahead. Umm so, back one more. So we talk about Open Practice or Open Pedagogy, depending which institution you’re standing on. At my institution I use the Open Practices. As a tool for creating learning experiences where the students use Open Education resources in the class, but they’re also asked to actively change those resources. What that means is, when I assign a reading, it has an Open License on it, I can change it as a teacher. Right? I can change it and I can say, “Let’s try something different.” “Let’s look at this from this perspective” or “Let me add a couple of lines that give regional context to it” But I can also say to my students, “Hey, why don’t you reformulate this into somethings that’s useful?” So I’ve had luck with doing this with for– I’m teaching an environmental Science class this quarter at TCC. It’s pre- college. It’s an adult basic education course. The students are, right now, working on an activity where they are finding evidence of plant growth. The hormones that plants use to change their growth, umm, in the environment right now. Because we’re changing seasons and leaves drop because of hormone, right? That plants produce. So they’re out taking pictures of that, they’re going to build an atlas for me describing that rather than me build it. I don’t have to tell them to look for that evidence. I can say to them, “Here’s a reading that describes what that is now you go find evidence of it” and “You’re going to reformulate it into something that I can give to the group of students who are going to take this class in the spring who aren’t going to be able to see leaves falling off of trees.” But they can go take pictures of plants sprouting buds. So eventually, I’m gonna have a year round pictures of different plants from the Tacoma region that my students can use to learn this information and then I can get them to take pictures of something else and eventually I’m gonna have a full collection that’s kind of a tour of our region that talks about environmental science from the perspective of Tacoma. Then we’ll speak to them a little bit closer to what they have before. That’s a version of what I mean by Open Pedagogy. Brown: So another example from TCC that connects to the video. So Joann, the student from TCC who’s talking about, umm, and she didn’t name it as an Open Pedagogy but that’s what she was describing. That was her Political Science course at TCC and that instructor, who’s a part- time faculty member– we have part- time and full- time faculty members who convert courses to Open– Umm, he does a research assignment and so he has themes, but, what he does is, when students find readings that they think are really really great, and those can be library resources, yay! Umm, from the databases or EBooks, so he heavily encourages uses, so bleeds over. Alternative educational resources as well. Then he adds that to the list and he promotes it like, “Hey, these are resources that other students say are good and they have edit them” So it’s not just the teachers saying, “You must read these, these are things that other students have found value in and wanted to pass on to other students” So that’s an example of one assignment where it’s not, it doesn’t have to be big. But it’s meaningful. West: And sometimes it’s born out of need. So the other thing that I think is really important to talk about with is the concept of the Renewable Assignment. We’re all familiar with the other kind of assignment I’m sure because we’ve all done them. The thing where you invest a ton of work and energy as the student and creating something, like say, a research paper or a lab assignment that you do for a class and you worked really really really hard to create the thing. These are really familiar in undergraduates classes. I say this to students and they’re like, “I’ve done this!” They do a bunch of, bunch of work and they turn it in to the instructor. The instructor grades it, the instructor is the audience. They grade it. Hopefully they give you really solid feedback that you will use. But then they give it back to you as the student and you look at it and you think, “what do I do with this”, and if you’re like me, you put it in a folder and carry it around for five years cause’ you really don’t wanna get rid of it because it was your work and it was so valuable. But if you’re other students, you put it directly in whatever the closest recycling can is because you have no idea what to do with it now that you’ve done this work. You have the experience of having done the work. You earned the grade. What is the value of keeping that thing anymore? Renewable assignments, say you’re the student, you’re gonna create something. But you’re creating it for a larger audience than just me or students in this classroom. You’re creating something that’s gonna be a part of the scholarly communication around this work because I’m gonna use it with future classes and I’m gonna tell my colleagues to use it with future classes. Like that assignment that our Poli- Sci teacher at TCC is doing, when those students recommend a reading, they’re not recommending a reading like, “Hey”–Umm I’m not sure who that teacher is but, oh it’s Mike Elmore! I would have guessed that. So “Hey Mike!– or professor I don’t really know what they call him, um but, “Hey Mike I really like this reading and I think you might like it too”, which is the kind of conversation that I might have with him, right? “I found this great reading and I think you might wanna review it.” These are students saying “You might wanna review it, but also share it with your next group of students if it’s really useful” “this is helpful and will help them to understand the concept you just explained to us.” Umm, Christie Fierro, this teacher who we keep referring to, used to do this with her students in a public speaking, or Introduction to Communication course, her first OER course– had a thing on diversity on it– and she found a reading and she put it in her class and she thought okay that covers the kind of inter-culture diversity conversation and one of her students read it and was actually kind of offended by it. This is the first time we kind of came across this idea. And Christie said to this student, “Oh I’m sorry you didn’t read it from that perspective.” Cause the student read this reading as like, marketing to people of color is a special thing and here’s how to target my community. And she was like, offended. Completely offended by it. So Christie had the conversation with her class and then said, “I recommend that you all go find something that gives us this theory and principle in a different way.” “And I’ll read them and I’ll include the ones that are best.” And she was still getting emails from that particular student a year later because that student cared so much about this concept and also cared so much about future students’ being able to learn from her because students want to be able to pass on their information. So why can’t we share it with them? We’re talking with our faculty at Pierce College about Open Pedagogy and in fact, we pay a stipend for developing OER courses, which is probably something you’re really interested in for OER Initiative. So, our stipends actually smaller than TCC’s [Laughing] only because it’s different funding models. But we pay a stipend for this work. Except that, we actually pay the stipend not for adopting OER, but for adopting OER and considering alternative pedagogy. And so a part of it is, we ask the faculty to think about designing information literacy assignment into their course or an open pedagogy assignment. And sometimes they’re the same thing. Which is always great for me. Um, because I was trained as a librarian. But we, um actually are asking the faculty to rethink how the students interact with the materials because it’s not just about the resources changing, it’s about the teaching and learning changing. Okay, I know I’m running long. But here’s our contact info. Brown: So one last thing on that note. The stipends, the funding model at TCC is stipends for adopting OER in revising a course and adopting it so. Similar with the E- Learning Team, we work together and Christie being an Instructional Designer also incorporates these Open Pedagogy ideas and it’s not just about funding, ‘Hey, here’s a textbook. Incorporate that instead of a regular textbook.” It’s looking at it from that holistic viewpoint. “Here’s how you can look at your entire course a little bit differently. Maybe even fall in love with your course again.” That’s what kind of happens is that, you as a teacher, start looking at your course differently and the ways that you teach. It just sort of refuels your own energy. So that’s the funding model at TCC where it’s the whole course development. West: TCC made a big move a couple of years ago where they institutionalized this. So, it’s institutional money. They’re using it so it’s more sustainable. At Pierce, we’re still running on soft funds so. Right now we have a grant that’s funding all of our work in OER. When that grant runs out we have to find a way to either get another grant or institutionalize the way we’re getting– we’re paying faculty to do this work. And part of the invitation is recognizing that developing Open courses is– it takes time. It takes a lot of energy on the faculty members part so. It’s really important to recognize that and find a way to say thank you. Our stipend does not began to cover the amount of hours that they spend doing the work but it’s a nice thank you. Brown: And uh, another thing– I know we’re just about out of time and I’m sorry we didn’t have time for questions, um, but you have our contact info –um, is, it not only takes time on the faculty members and there’s intentionality behind it. You’re really looking at your whole course. Also a big piece of it that comes through this is, you need support, right? So, librarians, E- Learning, project manners, it’s not just one, it’s not one size fits all. Even with the support, you’ve seen two kind of different models of support, both successful models. You know, it can be done however the campus culture is on your campus and just figure out a way that works for you, but building an intentionality in support is also key. Who are the people who were gonna help support this? Um and, having a team, yeah. How are that team? It might look differently campus to campus but having a team of support is super critical too, thank you. [Applause] [End of presentation]