Northwestern safety training: “Run, Hide, Fight”

Northwestern safety training: “Run, Hide, Fight”

August 24, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Emergencies of any kind are
unpredictable. Northwestern has many safety policies in
place to deal with critical situations. Northwestern Police go through extensive
training to prepare for the possibility of active violence and a crisis
management team is in place to manage critical incidents. But even with our
safeguards in place knowing how to respond can make all the difference.
Preparing for an emergency before one occurs makes you much more likely to be
able to protect yourself and respond appropriately. It’s important to pay
attention to where you are and think through what you could do if a threat
appears. If you find yourself in an active violence threat situation you’ll
have to quickly decide to run hide or fight. [casual background chatter] I mean look at this…super weird… I don’t know, that’s weird. [gunshots] [screaming, yelling] If you hear gunshots, don’t wait until
others tell you to act. If it’s safe to run, run. Always know your surroundings
and have escape routes in mind including exit stairwells and emergency exits. [screaming] Call 911 or University Police as soon as it’s safe to do so. Be sure to provide your exact
location. Northwestern University Police Department. Officer Crosby, how can help you? There’s a shooter outside of the Jacobs Center, the Jacobs Center! Outside the Jacobs Center. Can you tell me what he’s wearing? He’s wearing a black shirt and dark jeans. Ok, get somewhere safe, I have officers en route. Monitor your phone closely. Only pay
attention to official Northwestern and University Police notifications. Ignore
any other messages like texts, phone calls and social media from any other sources.
Do not share any information or photos of your location on social media. [gunshot] Those are gunshots come on we have to
lock the door, barricade it. Yeah belt the door please.
If it’s not safe to run, your best option is to hide in place. Lock or use items to
barricade the door and turn off the lights. Get up against the wall.
Spread out! Do not huddle together because it makes for one easy target.
Put your cellphone on silent. Call 9-1-1 and keep your voice down to avoid
being heard. [phone notification beeps] Oh my god there’s a shooter on campus! If you receive a notification that says
“shelter-in-place” this means to seek shelter in the building you are
currently in. Get down, get down. Remember to lock or barricade the door, silence your
cellphones and turn off the lights. Then remain there until further notice. [whispering] There’s a shooter in the building! If you cannot run or hide, your best
option is to fight. Fighting is a last resort when your life is in imminent
danger. Come on, get against the wall. Assume a survival mindset and know that
often violent situations are over in a few minutes. Look for anything you can
use as as a weapon: a textbook, a fire extinguisher, anything you can use to
distract or take down the assailant. Kevin, I’ll distract him, you hit him.
Develop a plan with others to take out a potential shooter. Be decisive and commit
to action. Focus on distracting and immobilizing the shooter.
Do not stop attacking until the aggressor is no longer a threat. Once the aggressor has been secured do
not touch any weapons or objects they may have carried. Instead, secure the
weapons with nearby objects. Um, hey give me that trash can! And wait for
authorities to arrive. In a situation where the suspect is
still at large, police will implement a rapid deployment response. Our only priority is to locate, identify and eliminate the threat. [Police radio chatter] When the police arrive we may not know who the shooter is. If you’re able to do so put your hands on the top your head we know you’re not the threat. Show us your hands! [police shouting commands] Drop the gun, drop it! Put your hands behind your head. Drop to
your knees. Put your hands out to your sides, palms up. Bruce, you got hands, I got cover. In an active violent situation you’ll
have to decide quickly to run, hide or fight. Your safety depends on this choice
and being prepared before an incident occurs. Remember: the responding officers’ first goal is to eliminate the threat. We may
pass injured people, but our first priority is preventing additional injuries. Our
second priority is attending to any injured parties. Even at a place like
Northwestern we’re not immune to violence. Preparation and prevention are
key to protecting our campus. Research shows that there are typically signs that someone was planning to attack before it happens. If you see concerning
behavior, threats, aggression or anything suspicious it is critical that you
report it. Campus safety is a shared responsibility. If you see something
you’re expected to say something. Northwestern’s behavioral consultation
team relies on information from our community to help keep us safe.
Non-emergency concerns regarding threatening statements or behaviors can
be reported by contacting the director of threat assessment or making an
anonymous report online to Wildcats Aware concerning behavior report. At Northwestern, nothing is more important than the safety of our community. There
are many people working to prevent active violence on our campus:
Northwestern Police, the behavioral consultation team, emergency management and most importantly, you.