New Law School Rankings Tool: My Rank by Spivey Consulting Introduction & Demo

New Law School Rankings Tool: My Rank by Spivey Consulting Introduction & Demo

November 9, 2019 3 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi everyone, my name is Anna Hicks, and I’m the Chief Operating Officer of the Spivey Consulting Group, and I’ve been leading
the development of our newest big project, My Rank, which is now available
at myrankbyspivey.com. My Rank is a free tool that law school applicants can
use to research schools. I actually got the idea for My Rank when were filming
a YouTube video with our Senior Consultant John Stachniewicz, who was
talking about ways to use the US News rankings in order to make a decision for
where to attend law school. A big part of John’s video was talking about how you
can look at the various metrics and determine which of those metrics are
important to you versus which weren’t important to you, basically ignoring the
weighting that the actual rankings publisher gives to the metrics
because those weightings don’t necessarily correlate to what you care
about in a law school. So if I got the idea to create an online tool for law school
applicants such that they can create their own set of rankings that are more
in line with how they prioritize the various metrics, versus how some rankings
publisher decides how they want to weight the metrics. So My Rank is now available
for free for all of you to use. You can check it out at myrankbyspivey.com.
So how do you actually use My Rank? I’m going to do a brief demo here to show you
some of the basics of how to use the site. There are several features
available for anyone to use on the site. The main feature is the rankings tool,
which is here at the My Rank tab. On the left hand side are all of the metrics
that you can use to create your rankings. To weight the metric, just click the
metric to open, then click and drag to choose how heavily you want it to factor
into your rankings. You can weight as many or as few metrics as you want. Each
metric is automatically set to zero importance, so unless you change it, it
won’t factor in. Try out weighting just a few metrics that are the most important
to you, or weighting each metric for a more nuanced set of rankings. There are
virtually endless possibilities based on what you prioritize. Another way that you
can use the My Rank tool is by applying filters. You can filter your list down
from every ABA-accredited law school to any subset
based on the rankings metrics or by a few additional categories including
location and class size. So for instance, if you only want your ranked list to
include law schools with an LSAT median between 160 and 165, you can use the
filters to narrow your list down to just those schools. There are four
categories that aren’t weighted for rankings that can be filtered. These
categories are first, location by state, second, class size, third, whether or not
the law school takes the GRE, and fourth, whether they give conditional
scholarships, or scholarships that can be taken away based on your law school GPA
after you start getting law school grades back. Here’s an example of how to
use the metrics and filters in conjunction. Let’s say I want to see all
law schools with an LSAT median between 152 and 158, ranked in order of their GPA
median. I can filter the LSAT medians here and then weight the GPA medians for
ranking here. What My Rank then displays is a narrowed down list from every ABA-accredited law school down to only those with my specified LSAT medians, ranked
in order of highest GPA median to lowest. If you want to save your rankings for
later, you can click the same ranking button at the top of the page. Note that
you can only save a ranking if you have an account, but it will save both the
ranking and the filters. Another feature that My Rank offers is a comparison tool. You can either choose schools to compare directly from the rankings page like
this, or you can click the compare tab from the top menu bar. From this page you
will be able to search law school you want to compare by name, or use the
filters to narrow down a list. So for instance, I could use the filters to see
only schools with a GPA median between 3.0 and 4.0, an LSAT median between 155
and 165, an overall employment rate greater than 80%, and only school is in
California or New York. Then I could choose up to five of these schools to
compare. If you have an account you can also save your comparisons for future
reference. You can access your saved rankings and comparisons on your account page here. So that’s the basics of how to use My Rank.
We truly hope that this tool is useful for you all in determining which law
schools might be the best fit for your background and goals. If you have any
further questions about how to use the tool, feel free to comment on this video,
and if you need more personalized guidance, as always you can reach out to
us at [email protected] to potentially work with us. And please
subscribe to our YouTube channel if you’re interested in law school
admissions advice from our team of consultants, who are former admissions
officers at schools like Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Chicago, and Penn. Thank you so much.