My University STUDY ROUTINE | How I Study (Tips + Advice)

My University STUDY ROUTINE | How I Study (Tips + Advice)

October 17, 2019 86 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi guys, and welcome back to Caitlin’s
Corner! Yeah, we’re shimmying because why not?! 😛
Many of you told me in the comments of a few of my videos that you’re already
back to school, which is just so upsetting…I’m so sorry for you…I go back
in a few weeks so I will be in the same boat very soon! But because many of you
are already in school mode I thought it’d be helpful to share with you some
of my study tips! I myself am definitely no “study expert,” but I am going into my
third year of university so I feel like, by now, I’ve kind of figured out a system
for—I don’t know talking with my hands?? a lot?? LOL– but tackling my finals, quizzes,
and tests. Hopefully by sharing my process there’s something in this video
that can help you out during those times when you’re internally crying at your
desk, and you have tons of textbooks and notebooks open, wondering how the heck
you’re gonna do this! I’ve been in that boat, I will be in that boat again, so
let’s travel together ! 😛 My first tip is probably the most important tip of all
and the most obvious because we pretty much do it– no we HOPEFULLY do it
24/7– and that is to BREATHE! If you’re feeling really nervous or anxious or
stressed before a test sometimes taking just a few deep breaths really puts
things into perspective…sometimes it puts things into perspective for a few
seconds, and then you’re stressed again, but at least you have a few seconds of
relief. It’s really important to stay calm though and I really try and take
this tip with me when I’m just about to write the exam when the paper is right
in front of me and I’m waiting for the T.A. to say you can begin– especially if
I’m not confident with the material, those few minutes are so nerve-racking
and my blood starts pumping and basically my emotions are going here and
I need to take a few breaths just to bring me back here so that I can
actually give myself the best chance to do well! Once I remember to breathe and
stay calm, my first official step in the studying process is to re-read my
lectures and my reading notes. I always go through this process in chronological
order so obviously start with the older stuff and make your way to the newest
material. Now I personally don’t just re-read everything because I
don’t find I retain information that way or as effectively that way…I
will have a notebook or a blank sheet of paper beside me and, as I go through each unit, I write down all of the major key points or key words in that unit (and
again, I try and keep it in the order that we discussed those topics in). So
I’m not making notes about everything, I’m just creating a big outline– a
very detailed outline –of everything that we’ve learned. After I do my first
initial detailed re-read of all the material, then I can use that
outline to kind of test my understanding of everything, and then any area or
keywords that I’m kind of “iffy” on, I’ll put star next to it and I know that
that’s somewhere that I need to go brush up on my understanding so that next time
I go through the outline, I’m able to recall information very quickly for all
of the topics. For me personally the outline/mind-map type of approach to
studying really helps cement details in my head, but for some that just isn’t
effective. So if you’re more of an audio person, you could even re-read your notes
and record yourself on your phone and then listen to those recordings when
you’re walking to class or making dinner. Also, a memorization tip that has
seriously helped me out is to use acronyms! This tip is life-saving
especially when I have to recall long lists of information… I don’t know about
you, but in tests details will kind of slip out of my head–even details that
throughout the whole time that I’ve been studying, I’ve never forgotten before… I
go to a test and it’s like I forget how even my name is spelt—so in situations
like those having a letter in an acronym to kind of push me in the right
direction can sometimes just be enough to spark me remembering what that piece
of information was. Something else I really like to do is to connect
different ideas or definitions with words or sounds that kind of help me
remember in the same way that an acronym does. For example when I was first learning what the supply and demand curve looked like– this is many moons ago–I figured out that you know supply has the word “up” in
it so sUP-supply the supply curve goes UP to the right and the demand curve is
“dddd”-down so dddd-down demand and sup-up-up-supply! Obviously now I don’t need that because I’ve had a few years of economics courses (unfortunately) so thosendefinitions or looks to the supply and demand curve are pretty stuck in [my brain]. But I do this all the time when I’m studying, so if you had a little window
into my brain while I was writing a test you would just see a lot of that kind of
stuff sprinkled all over the place…it’s a crazy place to be! Study tip number
three obviously, I think it’s pretty obvious, is to do practice homework
questions or even practice tests for math type courses- and I would assume science courses. Doing questions is really the only way that you can really ensure that
you’re grasping the material. Practice is very important for those types of
subjects and for other subjects as well– but I think with math-y courses
especially. If you don’t do practice questions you can re-read how to do
something all you want, but you got to actually be able to do it yourself. I
will always try and do a handful of questions from each unit so that I get a
good variety, and then based on which questions I’m not doing as well on I
will do more practice in those areas so I’m not wasting time in areas that I’m
pretty okay with. I also always try and do past tests, especially if your professor
is providing them. You want to make sure you take advantage of the fact that you
have examples of the types of questions that they asked in the past because
that’s a really good indication of the types of questions you are probably
going to be asked on your test– and sometimes past test questions
appear in your test, and then you’re like “oh my god I am rocking this question
because I’ve already done it before”… that rarely happens, or at least in my
experience unfortunately, but when it does, it feels pretty good! My tips when
doing pass tests is to treat them like real test so that you can truly see
where your understanding level is at, and secondly don’t do past tests that
aren’t written by your professor. Yes, sometimes doing past tests from your
course code specifically is helpful, but you
always have to proceed with caution because, in my experience, every prof– even profs that are teaching the same course –have different expectations and ask
questions differently. I only say that because there have even been situations
where even tests that my professor has written before are completely unlike the one
that gets handed to us in style and types of questions– basically in every
possible way it’s different— and you’re sitting there thinking, “what is
this sorcery that is in front of me?!” The worst thing you can do in those
situations is panic, so you kind of have to go into the test just being fully
prepared for anything to be thrown at you, and to just do your best. Because once you’re there, that’s all you can do is do your best. Sometimes I’ve written
[an answer] and I’m like, “well this makes no sense” and I get perfect marks and I’m like, “how did that happen?!” and then on the question that I thought I
actually knew what I was talking about, I got zero marks?… explain that to me! It’s
very confusing! 😛 Once I do all my re-reads I’ve done tons of questions and tests, I
just do a quick overview and call it a day. I want to make it clear, especially
to those of you who are going into university for the first time and are
probably worried about testing, that there have been many times where I’ve
walked into a test/exam that’s worth quite a bit of my grade, and I
don’t feel ready…and I probably am not ready. I’m not going to lie to you and say
that it always works out, because I’ve had a few blunders in two years of
University– and you will too– but it’s not always the end of the world! And chances
are, if you’re having troubles in a specific area of the course, there are
probably a lot of people having troubles as well, and that is usually reflected in
a bell curve once all the marks come out. Basically what I’m trying to say is once
you write the test, let it go and don’t worry about it! I thought it was really
important to include that point in here because I
think too many people doubt themselves, including me, once they’ve written
something and it’s been handed in and you just start replaying it all in your
head, and how you would have done it differently, but it’s useless to think
that way because what’s done is done! So try to just start focusing on the
next thing that you have to tackle! That concludes my study tips video, if you
found something in this video to be helpful then please be sure to give it a
big THUMBS UP! Let me know in the comments below what is your number one study tip for new students or veteran students… I really
love the fact that you guys are so willing to help each other out in the
comment section, so let’s continue the helpful advice down below! I will see
you all very soon with a new video and until then, bye everyone!