Mislabeled seafood may be more sustainable, new study finds

Mislabeled seafood may be more sustainable, new study finds

October 12, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


About 30 percent of seafood served in restaurants and sold in supermarkets is mislabeled. A new UW study is the first to broadly examine this mislabeling and its ecological and financial impacts. Researchers found that substituted fish are of a better conservation status and a little less expensive than the species on the label or menu. That means consumers are paying on average more for mislabeled fish. Depending on what you order, you can get a fish that is more endangered than what you ordered, or vice versa. They found that snapper, a fish listed as vulnerable, was one of the most frequently mislabeled fish. But the fishes most often substituted for snapper are doing even worse, listed as critically endangered, according to the study. The study’s results can help consumers make sustainable purchasing decisions by avoiding fish that are most likely to be mislabeled such as … … croaker, perch, sturgeon and shark catfish or basa. These results could also help seafood certification efforts — like seafoodwatch.org — focus on fisheries that are most likely to be mislabeled. MUSIC: ‘High Above’ by Nicolai Heidlas