Microsoft OneNote Learning Tools – Top Dyslexia App 2016

Microsoft OneNote Learning Tools – Top Dyslexia App 2016

December 4, 2019 3 By Stanley Isaacs


I am Jeff Petty, and I’m a principal program manager at Microsoft, in the accessibility group. I’m happy to show you what we created during the hackathon. What we are seeing right now is just One Note, which is an electronic notebook that helps students keep all of their information organized. One Note runs on multiple operating systems including Windows, Apple operating systems, Android. Let me just do a demo of the dictation feature. I’m going to turn on dictation, and now as soon as I start talking, it’s going to record the text… I could add a topic sentence, I could add a host of other thoughts. The key here, is I don’t have to type to enter the text to One Note. I can simply dictate, and it works for me. We created fonts to make it easier for people that suffer from visual crowding to read. If I zoom in, you can see that it’s pretty easy to read. But…if I select the text and choose what’s called ~Fluent Calibri~, which is one of the new font’s we created, you can see how it spaces letters, words, and lines to address the visual crowding challenge. Another piece of the solution, really the star, is the Immersive Reader. You can see when we launch it, right away how we make it easier to read. We use high contrast and large fonts, to really focus on the content. We have a bunch of other features, too… [Text is read aloud] This is our Immersive Reader, simultaneously highlighting and voicing text, provides benefits to ALL readers. If you are reading a long document, it helps you sustain focus. If you are an English Language learner, it helps you to hear things aloud. If you are somebody that has a learning difference, like Dyslexia, the benefits of multisensory processing are fairly well researched and proven. This can be critical for decoding information. There are a host of other things we do, and we’ll go into all of them, but one of the features that is probably worth calling out, because you just won’t see it anywhere else is our reading comprehension mode. Here, we are actually breaking up long sentences by highlighting where subordinate clauses begin and end. We are also signalling transitions between subjects and objects, by highlighting verbs. I don’t thing there are any other tools that are out there that go beyond aiding with decoding, and go straight after improving reading comprehension for everyone. [Daniel Hubbell] Hi, my name is Daniel Hubbell, and I am a senior program manager on the accessibility team at Microsoft. I wanted to briefly talk about the new version 5 of our Accessibility Guide for Educators. We’ve got 2 sections, one for Windows 10, and one for Office 2016, which are really organized under the categories of Reading and Literacy, Speech, Vision, Hearing Impairment, and Mobility impairments. And then under each of those, are a set of out comes that you can drive towards improving the learning experience with technology for those products. [Dr. Fernette Eide’s voice] If you’d like to learn more about us, visit our website, Or check us out on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. You can also subscribe to our Youtube channel. Subtitles by the Amara.org community