Life as a Veterinary Student | University of Adelaide

Life as a Veterinary Student | University of Adelaide

October 13, 2019 1 By Stanley Isaacs


I think growing up, and having a lot of
pets growing up, and like frequenting the vet, I always thought that, you know, there
were things that if I were a vet I might do differently, and I sort of harness
this as an opportunity to make a difference. College is really nice because
you make a lot of friends that sort of become your family, and you can complain
about things, or ask each other questions. From my placements that I’ve
done out in practice, this hospital definitely seems to be the most advanced
that I’ve been to, so it’s really good being able to learn not just on the
basic instruments that we’d be using out in practice, but also that little bit
extra, that’s not necessarily a day one skill for us but that we can sort of get
a bit of an introduction to before we go out into practice and we start to if we
want to specialise or if we just want to further our skills in certain areas. Every year I feel has got more
interesting and especially in the final year really enjoying putting all
together and yeah it’s great motivation to look back and review things we’ve
learnt earlier because we’re seeing, seeing it in real life. It’s just been really good, not just from
a learning aspect, there’s always a friend around going through with me that
I can ask a question but also social aspect you’ve got plenty of ways to
interact with younger year levels, older year levels, it’s easier to talk to
different lecturers and staff members as well. I’m in charge of one of the patients in the
hospital at the moment and I’m really enjoying being responsible and
definitely it’s a good confidence builder feeling like, you know, this could
be me – this will be me – next year and having great support around to talk
to you about any questions or concerns and discussing plans going forward with
the patients, so it’s been great. When they have a case that comes in, one
of us has to take ownership of it and we really have to run that case like we
were they actual vet. We can’t just be students anymore. We do actually have to
make sure we know what questions to ask, where to lead the consult, where we can
go for treatment. They’ve organised it really well to try and get us to be more
independent, especially leading up to graduating because this is stuff
that we do need to know. I find most of the clients coming
through the clinic they are quite polite and they’re very understanding that this
is a teaching hospital, especially in terms of communication. We are not as
confident or fluent as a clinician. A couple of staff you know, say ‘you know if
you have any problems, text me if you have a question at midnight or
something’, you know. A lot of them are quite open, have a real open-door policy.
The resources are fantastic. So in the final year the student’s
clinical rotations are really a crowning piece of training for them. We view them
as our junior colleagues on all of those core rotations and as our junior
colleagues they get to start to be really coming to grips with all of the
skills that you need when you’re truthfully out in practice. I know the clinicians in private
practice know it’s a really great comfort to know there’s such a great
facility that patients can be referred to and yeah we’re really lucky
to be spending time with specialists in such a great facility.