Johns Hopkins University Graduation Ceremony 2016

Johns Hopkins University Graduation Ceremony 2016

October 12, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– [Provost Lieberman] The ceremony will
now come to order. Good afternoon. I’m Robert Lieberman, Provost and Senior
Vice President for Academic Affairs, and I’m honored to serve as Chief Marshal
for the 2016 Johns Hopkins University Commencement Ceremony. University
Chaplain, Kathy Schnurr will offer the invocation. Please remain standing for the
invocation and for the National Anthem sung by Peabody Graduate Performance
Diploma candidate, Rebecca Wood. – [Ms. Schnurr] My sisters and brothers,
let us pray. Source of truth for all generations, we are assembled here to celebrate today
the Johns Hopkins University Class of 2016. We are so very thankful this day has
arrived, and our hearts are filled with energy and joy by the possibilities that
lie ahead. Gentle spirit, we are profoundly and humbly aware that
our accomplishments come as the result of not only countless hours in libraries,
practice rooms, and laboratories, but also as the result of the
encouragement and support of our mentors, our instructors, our friends, and many
others we have met along the way. The engagement of intricate and eternal
questions, and the courage to change course as discoveries led to surprising
and new pursuits is a shared achievement. We are particularly grateful for the
dedication, love, and sacrifices of our parents and families, those who are here
today, and those who are celebrating from afar. Today, we remember also those whom
we hold dear who are no longer with us, especially Rachel Reichner, whose life
ended tragically too soon. We deeply miss them, and they will always
be carried in our hearts. Generous God, you are the architect of
every cell, and the power that choreographs and illuminates the galaxies.
We are awed by the splendor of your creation, and this beautiful mosaic of
humanity. May we make of our lives examples of courage and wisdom, gentleness
and beauty, justice and hope, comfort and healing. As we leave this
place, guide our feet that we may find the cadence of Shalom. Guide our breathing
that we may feel the pulse of Salam. Guide our minds that we may learn the
tempo of Shanti. Guide our hearts that they may come to beat the rhythm of peace.
Together, we say “amen.” ♪ Oh, say, can you see,
by the dawn’s early light, ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hail’d
at the twilight’s last gleaming? ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
thro’ the perilous fight, ♪ ♪ O’er the ramparts we watch’d,
were so gallantly streaming? ♪ ♪ And the rockets’ red glare,
the bombs bursting in air, ♪ ♪ Gave proof thro’ the night
that our flag was still there. ♪ ♪ O say, does that star-spangled
banner yet wave ♪ ♪ O’er the land of the free
and the home of the brave? ♪ – Please be seated. It’s my pleasure to
introduce Mr. Jeffrey Aronson, Chair of the Board of Trustees. – [Mr. Aronson] Good afternoon, honored
guests, my colleagues on the Board of Trustees and on the faculty, and most
importantly to the incredible members of the Johns Hopkins University Class of
2016. You have our warmest welcome. This is a great day for you and
certainly a great day for us. From this day forward, you will be
identified as graduates of the Johns Hopkins University. Your association with Johns Hopkins will
serve you well for the rest of your life, even more so than you may recognize at
this moment. On behalf of the university’s Board of Trustees, I extend our
congratulations for a job well done, and best wishes in your life to come. We
look forward to your loyalty and enthusiasm, and passion for our
university, whose future in a very real sense is in your hands right now. For our
part, we pledge to do everything in our power to make sure Johns Hopkins remains a
leader in higher education and a university of which you will always be
proud. I’m delighted at this time to carry on a great Hopkins tradition. Will the
mothers, fathers, husbands, wives, and partners of the candidates for
degrees please rise and remain standing? Today, all of our attention is directed
to our graduates, who are soon to receive their degrees. Last year, when I asked our
parents to stand, my wife Shari joined me in standing, because two of our
daughters were about to become Hopkins graduates. For all the parents standing
now, including my good friend and fellow trustee, Charlie Scharf and his wife,
Amy, who I know is out there somewhere, I know exactly how you all feel.
Unbelievably proud, bursting with pride, tingling, perhaps a little amazed that you
can’t believe this is happening. To all of our guests, your appreciation of
the great value of a Johns Hopkins education, your understanding of the need
to sometimes make very difficult choices and sacrifices in pursuit of that goal,
and the unconditional support you have shown all along the way is in no small
part responsible for their tremendous achievement today. We, the trustees,
faculties, students, and administration of the Johns Hopkins University
honor and salute you. Thank you. Please be seated. Before I
turn this back to Provost Lieberman, I thought I would share a very quick
story. So I had the pleasure and the privilege of graduating from Johns Hopkins
36 years ago in May of 1980. At that point, the president of Johns
Hopkins in his remarks said something that always, always stuck with me, and it was a
really simple rule. “When in doubt, do the right thing.” I
thought that was particularly appropriate to share today in light of our
commencement speaker. So with that, congratulations to everyone. Enjoy this
day, savor it, remember it forever, and have a wonderful time. Thank you. – Thank you, Jeff. Now, I’m pleased to
introduce Mr. Jay Lenrow, a 1973 graduate of the Zanvyl Krieger
School of Arts & Sciences, a member of the University Board of
Trustees, and President of the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association. – [Mr. Lenrow] Thank you, Provost
Lieberman. Good afternoon, graduates, family, and friends. It is my great
pleasure and indeed an honor to welcome you, the Class of 2016, into the next
phase of your membership in the Johns Hopkins family of alumni. By the end of
this week, we will number more than 208,000 worldwide. Our alumni are as
accomplished and foresighted as our founder, and we represent virtually every
imaginable occupation throughout the world. I ask you to think about one of the
famous movies that you see around the holidays, a classic by Frank Capra, “It’s
a Wonderful Life”. In that film, George Bailey had the opportunity to see
what the small town of Bedford Falls would’ve been like had he never lived.
Now, I ask all assembled here to imagine what Baltimore, the United States, and
indeed the world would’ve been like but for the vision of one man, Mr. Johns
Hopkins. If you eliminated the vast store of knowledge that our university has
contributed to the betterment of the world, all mankind would be significantly
less well-off. My fervent hope is that someday when people think of you, they
will understand how through your ties to Johns Hopkins University the world is a
much better place because of you. Our alumni association is here to help you
maximize your potential. This connection to Johns Hopkins is your
gateway to an incredible network of cultural, social, affinity, and networking
events designed by and for our alumni. Your alumni association currently has 92
alumni communities worldwide, participating in 350 events in 17
countries. If you don’t find a group that interests you, we will assist you in
forming it. To begin with, I recommend that each graduate here should
GoHopOnline our new web-based networking platform that welcomes all JHU alumni, and
it’s easily linked to existing Facebook or LinkedIn accounts. Use it to facilitate
everything from networking to tips on where to live in your new hometown. Join
your fellow Hopkins alumni by attending or planning an event, by talking to your
colleagues, friends, and prospective students about your experience, and by
remaining in touch with your professors and classmates. Take advantage of
everything your alumni association has to offer. In addition to GoHopOnline and our
award-winning alumni.jhu.edu website, connect with us throughout Facebook,
LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and others by searching for either
“JHAA_President” or “JHU_Alumni”. Again, I offer my congratulations to each
and every one of you, and wish you all the very best. I hope
this will be the first of many times we get to meet through Hopkins. As you go out
and celebrate, remember you are forever a Johns Hopkins Blue Jay. Thank you. – Thank you, Jay. Today’s commencement
ceremony marks the close of the 140th academic year at Johns Hopkins University.
In that time, 14 presidents have led the university, beginning with President
Daniel Coit Gilman, who originated the research mission at the university and
hired the first faculty. Our current president, Ronald J. Daniels,
assumed office on March 2, 2009. As is traditional, he will now
address the candidates for degrees. – [President Daniels] To our honorary
degree recipients, alumni and trustees, to our faculty and staff, to our parents,
family members, and friends, and most especially to our graduates,
welcome to the Johns Hopkins University Commencement for the great Class of 2016. Now, I know. I know that some of you may
not have aspired to be the first to graduate in the Royal Farms Arena, a
temple to our local convenience store, to fry chicken tenders and western fries.
But trust me. Your dry, comfortable, warm families and friends
think you are the most thoughtful and brilliant class ever, particularly given
the cold and rainy deluge that has descended upon Baltimore over the last
three weeks. Okay. So it’s sunny now. But it was really bad for the last three
weeks. No one is going to get drenched here today. No one is going to suffer heat
stroke. Indeed, during your time here, The undergraduates weren’t
clapping, but their families were. You are wise. Indeed, during your time
here, graduates, you have brought the same characteristic, thoughtfulness and
brilliance, to so many large and vexing questions. Is it acceptable to eat your
weight in shrimp at the Sunday Brunch at FFC? Which will you sneak into, Gilman
Tower or the Steam Tunnels, or both? Is it okay to steal a saved seat
in the Brody Reading Room? Of course, we know that these aren’t the
truly significant concerns upon which you’ve been focused during your years at
Johns Hopkins. Instead, your focus and your studies have opened
new understandings of creative expression, scientific discovery, and social and
economic theory. You have been here at a time when the national and local
conversation has been framed by urgent and probing issues of race, class, politics,
and justice. All issues that at their core are about the complex nature of human
experience and perspective, and the institutions that shape, embody,
and perpetuate that complexity. Sometimes we confront this complexity in
people and institutions at some distance. But more often, we do so in close and very
personal ways, and let me share one example with you. Each morning, I leave
Nichols House, my house on the campus, and walk along Bowman Drive to my office
at Garland Hall. It is named for Isaiah Bowman, the fifth president of Johns
Hopkins University, who served from 1935 to 1948. His term spanned the rise of
Nazism in Europe, and the cataclysm of World War II and its immediate aftermath.
As some of you well know, Dr. Bowman’s story is complicated. Now,
here’s the good. He was a renowned geographer, an academic leader, whose
vision for the university [included] bringing the Applied Physics Laboratory
into our institution and sowing the seeds of interdisciplinary research that have
proven so prescient today. As a public servant, he advised presidents
and participated in discussions that launched the United Nations. But here’s
the other side. Here’s the rest of the story. Dr. Bowman was an unrepentant
racist and an anti-Semite. He introduced a 10% quota for Jewish
students at a time when many other institutions of higher education in the
United States who had those practices decided to end them. But that’s when he
started. He actively blocked the hiring of Jews into the professoriate, and derailed
the applications of African American students against the recommendations of
the faculty. I am a Jew whose father emigrated from Europe on the eve of the
Holocaust. As you would expect, I have a visceral reaction to Dr. Bowman.
He is a flawed leader, whose ideas and actions are not only
reprehensible to me from the perspective of the present, but even I believe
inexcusable in the context of his time. Yet, his accomplishments individually and
on behalf of our university are real and undeniable. On that daily walk along
Bowman Drive, I am unavoidably in a dialogue with a man whose views I abhor,
but whose legacy lives on at the university, the recipient of his successes
and his failures. F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, “The test of
a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the
same time, and still retain the ability to function.” I take from this not that we
should adopt a naïve view of the world that suggests you could find good in
anyone, no matter how harmful their views or actions may be, nor that we should be
governed by a convenient moral relativism and therefore incapable of any judgement.
Rather, we must be open to the complexities and contradictions of
humankind. Through that broad aperture, seek better, more informed, and more just
decisions for ourselves, for our institutions, and for our society.
Now, we all know we’re living in a moment of considerable oversimplification. This
is a world where we judge, you judge, potential partners with a
swipe, where policy debates are adjudicated in 140-character tweets, where
the news cycle is 24 hours, yet reduces opinions on everything from
pandemics to geopolitical upheaval, to Beyonce’s marriage, to a 30-second
soundbite. In this context, we must strain to see, to understand, and
to reckon with greater complexity. If we do not, we deny ourselves the
opportunity to learn from people’s flaws, or to be surprised, to be astonished by
their abilities, by their actions. If we do not, we are robbed of the chance
to let multiple strains of information collide and percolate in our minds as we
form more nuanced interpretations, ones that can help us navigate a way
forward in a world that is rarely sketched in black-and-white, but instead painted in
rich hues of grey. Your commencement speaker today, Spike Lee, illuminates the
nuances of the human character in his masterpiece film,Do the Right Thing.
You’re going to hear that a lot today. A film that I still find bracing nearly 30
years after I first saw it. The film explores the intertwined
experiences of neighbors in a Brooklyn community on the verge of explosive racial
conflict. In the midst of this slice of life drama, Spike Lee inserted a series of
straight-to-camera tirades by characters representing all the races and ethnicities
in the neighborhood. Each was more [inaudible]-filled
and racially charged than the next. It is searing. The viewer is forced to
confront the contradictions of these characters. Some hold deeply bigoted
views, yet they also live cheek-by-jowl with one another, sometimes in harmony,
sometimes in conflict. No character is one note. Only when taken
together can we understand fully the picture of life in that community at that
moment. Whether on-screen or in our lives, it is only by holding such contradictions,
such complexities that we can understand and hope to change the trajectory of our
shared story. Graduates of the Class of 2016, you are an extraordinarily talented,
fearless, and determined group of people. You have spent time here honing your many
extraordinary, God-given gifts. We’re counting on you to be among those
who are able to see, indeed who are determined to see the full scope, the full
complexity of the human experience. The world will be better for that. We are
so very proud of you. God speed, and congratulations to the
great Class of 2016. Thank you. I now have the great
privilege of presenting the individuals who will, in just a moment, be recognized
for peerless accomplishments in their fields, the distinguished honorary degree
recipients of 2016. Roll the film. ♪ [music] ♪ – Today, we honor the men and women
who share our drive and determination. – We salute the ways they’ve
changed our community. – And changed the world. – Internationally-acclaimed author,
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. – [Ms. Adichie] So my advice to the
graduate [inaudible] is eat real food as often as you can, and embrace
ignorance. Say those words, “I don’t know.” Because by embracing
ignorance, you open up the possibility of knowledge. – Pioneering, academic, and philanthropic
leader, Judith Rodin. – [Dr. Rodin] My advice to you is this, be
both your most loyal fan and your own fiercest critic. Neither one alone will
get you very far. Make sure that when you think about what you’re doing, you’re
doing it for yourself and not to win the approval of others. – Nobel Prize winning neuroscientist, Dr.
Richard Axel. – [Dr. Axel] At Johns Hopkins, you’ve not
received training. You’ve received an education. It is your task to build a
world in which ideas matter, a world that idealizes the virtues of deep
and open thought. – Philanthropist and retired judge, the
Honorable Ellen Heller. – [Judge Heller] Early on, one learns in
life, as I did, you can’t save the world. Indeed, you can be weighed down by some of
what you hear that’s going on in the world. But you can make a positive impact
person to person. – Renowned researcher, Susan Baker. – [Ms. Baker ] You are embarking upon a
life of potential greatness, a voyage into uncharted waters. You will
be meeting challenges that you may think you’re not going to be able to take on.
But you will be fearless and enjoy your travels. – Academy Award winning producer,
director, actor, and activist, Spike Lee. – [Mr. Lee] I did not become a film maker
because I wanted to be famous. I did not become a film maker because I
wanted to make a lot of money. I became a film maker because I found
something that I love. If you want to be happy, have a happy life, and not be
miserable, find something that you love. – Eminent attorney and philanthropist,
Shale Stiller. – [Mr. Stiller] The most important piece
of advice I can give to the graduates is to remember that these are commencement
exercises. That means you have just begun your education. Learn many, many different
things and educate that mind of yours, the greatest thing that you have. – Esteemed researcher, Laurie Zabin. – [Dr. Zabin] Whether you say it quietly
to yourself or you all say it together, I hope you remember those words,
“Nothing’s going to stop me now.” – The Class of 2016 says thank you to
these bold leaders. – For your words and your lifetime of
actions that point all of us toward a better tomorrow. ♪ [music] ♪ – Each year at commencement, the
university recognizes extraordinary contributions with honorary doctorates.
Candidates for honorary degrees will now be conferred. Winston Tabb, the Sheridan
Dean of University Libraries and Museums will begin today’s presentations of
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Will Chimamanda Ngozi
Adichie please stand forward? – [Dean Tabb] A writer who finds
inspiration among the simplicities of everyday life, you once referred to
yourself as an “unrepentant eavesdropper”. Your keen talent as a collector of stories
has brought you both a devoted following and critical acclaim. Through your elegant
and engaging explorations of the gravity of war and cultural divides across
continents, you have generated far-reaching positive effects in the
publishing industry, creating opportunities for a new wave of African
writers, many of them women. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, for always
striving to put a human face on life-changing events and class struggles,
to force a greater understanding, the Johns Hopkins University is proud to
confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Paul Rothman, the Frances Watt Baker
and Lenox D. Baker Jr. Dean of the Medical Faculty will present
the next candidate for the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Will Richard
Axel please stand forward? – [Dean Rothman] You rose from the streets
of Brooklyn to the pinnacle of the academic world. But that is no surprise
coming from someone who, as a young man, devoured books at the New
York Public Library and scored cheap tickets to the Metropolitan Opera. Your
innate intellectual curiosity led you to neuroscience, a field you transformed with
your groundbreaking research into something fundamental to the human
experience, our sense of smell. Richard Axel, for your tireless pursuit of
answers to critical scientific questions, for your collaborative spirit across
disciplines, and for your innate love of big ideas, whether in the sciences or
arts, the Johns Hopkins University is proud to confer upon you the degree of
Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Ed Schlesinger, the Benjamin T. Rome
Dean of the G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering will present
the next candidate for the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Will the
Honorable Ellen Heller please stand forward? – [Dean Schlesinger] As a judge, you ably
managed a daunting caseload and established systems that made one of our
most important institutions function more smoothly. In the criminal cases that came
before you, you were often forced to confront the darkest aspects of human
behavior. Yet, you never lost your humanity. In fact, your empathy for your
fellow Baltimoreans inspired you to find new ways to serve others, both in your
hometown and overseas. Ellen Heller, for your accomplishments as a judge, a
civic leader, and a philanthropist, and for your incisive legal skills and
your seemingly bottomless well of compassion for others, the Johns Hopkins
University is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane
Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Beverly Wendland, the James D. Knapp
Dean of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences will present the next candidate
for the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Will Shelton Lee
please stand forward? – [Dean Wendland] When you were studying
film, people said you should pursue a different career, because at the time
there were few black filmmakers. Fortunately, you did not take that advice.
By chasing your dreams, you brought untold stories and diverse
voices to the big screen, and opened doors that allowed other
artists to pursue their dreams as well. Shelton Jackson Lee, for your
accomplishments as a director, an actor, and a writer, for your passionate
commitment to your craft, and your fearless desire to challenge audiences
with your art, and for your dedication to fostering the careers of so many others,
the Johns Hopkins University is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Vali Nasr, Dean of the Paul H. Nitze
School of Advanced International Studies will present the next candidate for the
degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. Will Judith Rodin please stand forward? – [Dr. Nasr] You have made it your mission
to help communities pick up after a disaster strikes. It is a calling that
began with your career in academia, and continues today on a global scale
through your leadership at the Rockefeller Foundation. Your contributions to the
field of psychology are remarkable. You left a rich legacy to the institutions
you have served as an academic leader, and as a leader in philanthropy you are
helping to secure the infrastructure that will serve generations to come. Judith
Rodin, for your remarkable vision, for the powerful example you have set for
the future women leaders, and for your deep desire to help others,
the Johns Hopkins University is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Bernard Ferrari, Dean of the Carey
Business School, will present the next candidate for the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters. Will Shale Stiller please stand forward? – [Dr. Ferrari] Your love for the law is
matched only by your passion for serving your community. As an attorney, you have
made a lasting imprint on our state’s legal landscape, and skillfully served
innumerable clients over a long and remarkable career. As a civic leader, your
dedication can be seen across the city of Baltimore and beyond, particularly in the
many projects and initiatives you’ve supported in your role with the Weinberg
Foundation. Shale Stiller, we are delighted that Johns Hopkins was
able to contribute to your intellectual pursuits 40 years ago. In honor of your
deep intelligence, tremendous work ethic, and tireless devotion to Baltimore, the
Johns Hopkins University is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Patricia Davidson, Dean of the
School of Nursing, will present the next candidate for the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters. Will Laurie Zabin please come forward? – [Dr. Davidson] At a time when society
was reluctant to discuss sex education, you took a scholarly approach to guide
policy leaders and the public at large, blazing new trails in our understanding of
reproductive health and adolescent sexual behavior. You focused on the real-world
needs of clinicians here in Baltimore and beyond, and brought a practical approach
that has bettered the lives of women and children across the globe. Laurie Zabin,
for your tireless efforts to link academic research with on-the-ground realities, for
your fearlessness in pursuing controversial topics, and your passion for
the people who most benefit from your work, the Johns Hopkins University is
proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa. – Dr. Michael Klag, dean of the Bloomberg
School of Public Health will present the next candidate for the degree, Doctor of
Humane Letters. Will Susan Baker please stand forward? – [Dr. Klag] It is no exaggeration to say
that your research and advocacy have helped save countless lives, particularly
among children and other vulnerable populations. It is a legacy that has made
you, in the words of one of your students, “the Albert Einstein of injury
prevention.” Susan Baker, for your accomplishments as a scholar and advocate,
for your innovative approach to research, and your courageous pursuit of the public
interest, and for your enthusiastic support of colleagues and your fervent
desire to share knowledge with your peers and the public at large, the Johns Hopkins
University is proud to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane
Letters honoris causa. – Before I formally confer the degrees, I
just want to share one thing with you all that may not be so clearly evident. Now,
there’s an obvious connection between and among all of our degree recipients this
year, in terms of their extraordinary humanity and the excellence, and the great
distinction that they have brought to so many different spheres of human activity.
That connection is profound and palpable and is easy to see today. There is another
connection, though, that I want to just highlight for you that
is shared among a few of our graduates. That is that this year marks a very
special year, which is the 100th anniversary of the founding of the
Bloomberg School of Public Health. There are some Bloomberg graduates here
that can bring some excitement to that statement. Bloomberg School, for those of
you who know, was started with a landmark gift from the Rockefeller Foundation that
was determined to establish a much more rigorous study of public health in America
and to locate public health within a university setting. That gift, of course,
led to the creation of the Bloomberg School and forever changed the nature of
public health. Judy Rodin today, the head of the Rockefeller Foundation of
course represents that great connection. But the other connection, of course, is
that we have two icons of the School of Public Health, Susan Baker and Laurie
Zabin, who are being honored here today, two people whose work, whose advocacy,
whose scholarship, whose impact is truly internationally recognized. I just wanted
you to all know that this other connection is very much a part of what we’re
celebrating today, and to again congratulate the Bloomberg School on an
extraordinary 100 years. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Richard Axel,
Susan Baker, Ellen Heller, Shelton Lee, Judith Rodin, Shale Stiller,
and Laurie Zabin, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Board of
Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon you the degree, Doctor of
Humane Letters, together with all the honors, rights, and privileges
appertaining thereto. I’m going to present each of you with a diploma indicating this
honor has been conferred, and the deans will vest you with the
ensign of the degree. Congratulations. – Amy Sun, President of the Class of 2016,
will bring greetings. – [Ms. Sun] Welcome to the students,
faculty, parents, grandparents, and all of those who are currently
checking their phones to see when this is going to be over. Four years ago, when we
first arrived on campus, we were excited about finding our classes
and finding our niche, yet excited about the opportunities we
would have here, preparing to become engineers, lawyers, writers, astronauts,
and doctors. Today, we proudly celebrate the graduation of the Class of 2016 of the
Johns Hopkins University. Of course, none of this would have been
possible without the guidance of our mentors. To our teachers, thank you for
sharing your expertise with us and for your wisdom, and thank you for your
tolerance and understanding of our inexperience when we first began our
college journey. To our advisors, thank you for your support, encouragement,
and patience. To our friends, thank you for sticking with us every step
of the way, whether that was sneaking insomnia cookies to us in the library at
3:00 a.m.the day before an exam, or cheering for us at our concerts and
dance performances. Most importantly, we thank our parents who more than anyone
helped us arrive at this long-awaited day. You have given and sacrificed so much,
primarily money. Let’s give them a big thank you. Our time at Hopkins has been a truly
unforgettable experience, from the thrill of celebrating a great
lacrosse victory to stuffing our faces with fried Oreos at Spring Fair. These
moments have brought us to today, and now we are faced with the $1 million
question, “What are you going to do with your life?” I know that many of you are
just like me, planners. We like to know when, where, with whom,
why, and what is going to happen long in advance. But one of the most important
things I’ve learned in college is to expect the unexpected. I started at
Hopkins set on becoming a mechanical engineer. Then, when opportunity presented
itself, I applied for the biomedical engineering program and, to my delight and
surprise, was accepted. Now, that I struggled four long years,
what have I chosen to go into after college? Consulting. Freshman me never
would’ve guessed. So if you don’t yet have the answer to the question “What are you
going to do with your life?” or even if you do have a plan, I’d like to share
something with you. Things change and plans rarely work out the way we expect.
However, I am learning that there is a beauty in waiting, a beauty in realizing
that there are more possibilities for you and for me than our myopic minds can
perceive. So please rest in the knowledge that next year will be an adventure, so
take time to enjoy it. You never know what is just around the
corner for you. So no matter how the career chips fall, remember that Johns
Hopkins has helped us develop the academic credentials and skills that will make us
the leaders of tomorrow. You are smart, loving, determined,
persistent, passionate, and inspiring. I am truly honored to be amongst you.
Congratulations to the Class of 2016. Now, it gives me great pleasure to
introduce this year’s commencement speaker, global media leader, famed
filmmaker, and activist, Spike Lee. Through his movies and his activism, he
challenges assumptions about race and prejudice, and examines community, urban
crime and poverty, along with other pressing issues. Spike Lee has received an
Honorary Oscar, two Academy Award nominations, an Emmy, and many other
awards. Through his production company, 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks, he
continues to create and direct both independent films and projects for both
major studios, as well as working on story development, creating internship programs
for aspiring filmmakers, releasing music, and providing community
outreach and support. I know he will challenge and inspire our
graduating class. Please join me in warmly welcoming this year’s commencement
speaker, Spike Lee. – Hello. That’s weak. Hello. Thank you.
Greetings to the Johns Hopkins University. I give thanks to President Daniels, the
Board of Trustees, the faculty administration, especially the graduating
class of 2016. Again, we must acknowledge the people who made
this all possible, the parents. As the great philosopher and poet, Mr.
P.R. Nelson, once said, “Dearly beloved, we got here today to get
to this thing called life.” But on this occasion, the graduation of the class of
the year of our Lord, 2016, Johns Hopkins University, I’ve been
blessed to do what I want, what I love. I love what I do and what I
do is I make films. I’m a filmmaker. I’m a storyteller. There are two words
that are almost in all of my 23 feature films to date. These two words are, “Wake
up.” Wake up from the sleep. Wake up from being comatose. Wake up from
the slumber that keeps your eyes shut of inequalities and injustices, to this often
more than not evil, crazy, and insane world we live in. Let’s
move our unconscious minds from the back to the front, to a conscious state, and
wake up. Let’s leave our lofty ivory towers of institutions and get down to the
people. As the sisters and the brothers say on the block, “Get woke.” Let’s be
alert, be open-minded, get woke. Let’s wake up. Like the knuckle rings worn
by the late Ray Raheem, let’s truly know the difference between
love and hate. As Malcolm X said, ‘We’ve been took, hoodwinked, led astray,
run amuck, and bamboozled.” People, we’re at a very crucial moment in history
of these United States of America. The way I’m looking at it today, to tell
you the truth, things are looking dicey. It can go either way. I don’t know about
you, but I’m worried. I’m worried for the graduating class here
at Johns Hopkins University. They told me about the S. I didn’t know,
but I got educated. In addition to the graduating classes all over this God’s
planet. I wish you’d be graduating into a world of peace, light, and love, but
that’s not the case. We don’t live in a fairy tale, but I guess the 1% does. After
you leave here today, it’s going to be real life and real life
is no joke. It’s real out here for the other 99% for sure. Now, it’s up to you,
this new generation, to make a fairer, just world. It’s up to the graduation
classes of 2016 to make a better world for the 99% who are daily being
hornswaggled, hoodwinked, duped, buked, and scorned, double-crossed,
incarcerated, profiled, starved, miseducated, used and abused, and even
shot down on our streets. Graduates, please leave here on the
straight and narrow, and please don’t go the way of straight up skull-duggery. I
got that word from Mike Tyson, one of my favorite words. Skull-duggery.
The United States of America is a very diverse nation. This is one of the many
things that make us great despite the legacy of the genocide of its native
people and slavery. The United States Census Bureau and not Spike Lee says five
years from now white children will be a minority, and by 2049 white folks will be
wholly outnumbered by nonwhites. This is happening people, here and now. I
feel it’s time to start to embrace it, not fight it. No matter how one might wish
it to be otherwise, we are not making America great again by
going back to Eisenhower, Jim Crow, firehouses, German shepherds,
Eisenhower, andLeave it to Beaver.Not having it. Now is the time to seize the day. Take advantage of this unique
moment in history and build bridges amongst us. I’m talking about gender,
race, religion, and nations, not walls. Let us build bridges of love,
versus walls of hate. All right. Sidebar number one. Standing
here, I’m amongst some of the greatest minds in the world here at Johns Hopkins
University, people who are a lot smarter than me. So I ask, can somebody please
educate me, me, somebody from the public school education in the Republic of
Brooklyn, New York? Can someone please explain to me how you can tell Mexico to
build a 25-foot wall on the borders on top of that, and have the audacity to tell
them, “Mexico, you foot the bill too?” WTF? Sidebar dos. Tonya, my lovely wife who’s
here, and I gave a fundraiser at our home for President Barack Hussein Obama during
his first term in office. I don’t know about you, but I’m going to
miss him and he will be on the right side of history. But anywho, I heard of this
football. This is the device, it looks like a briefcase, that when
activated can trigger a nuclear attack. I thought it was a myth. It’s always close
to the president. It was in our home when the vehicle parked outside. I stand before
you to testify it’s not a myth. This football is for real, and I was
scared just catching a glimpse of it. Fast-forward today, now I have recurring
nightmares. I toss and turn because of my nightmare. Donald Trump has become the
45th president of the United States of America and he has the nuclear code to the
football. He gets mad at somebody and we’re all going to go boom. Two more
booms, boom, boom. Dear God, save us. But we got to get woke, got to
wake up. To bring it to a close here, I’d like to go back once again to my
friend, the philosopher, the poet, and the great humanitarian, Mr. P.R.
Nelson. You might know him also as the artist, Prince. Can we give some love to
Prince, please? Prince is a true great American, and he wrote a song entitled “Baltimore”. Don’t
worry. I’m not going to sing it. But here it is. “Baltimore, nobody got
nobody’s way. So I guess you could say, it was a good day. At least a little bit
better than a day in Baltimore. Does anybody hear us pray for Mike Brown
or Freddie Gray? Peace is more than the absence of war. Absence of war. Are we
gonna see another bloody day. We’re tired of the crying and people are
dying. Let’s all take the guns away. Absence of war. You and me, may finally we
say enough is enough? It’s time for love. It’s time to hear.
It’s time to hear the guitar play. Guitar play. Baltimore, evermore. If there
ain’t no justice, then there ain’t no peace. If there ain’t no justice, there
ain’t no peace. If there ain’t no justice, there ain’t no peace. Baltimore, are we
gonna see another bloody day. We’re tired of crying and people are
dying. Let’s take all the guns away. If there ain’t no justice, there ain’t
gonna be no peace. Baltimore, if there ain’t no justice, there ain’t
gonna be no peace.” Thank you. Go with God. Black lives matter. – Thank you, Spike. – At this time, I’d like to invite Taylor
Alessio and Jennifer Hansen, co-chairs of the Senior Class Gift
Committee, to present the class gift to President Daniels. – [Ms. Alessio] Good afternoon. I’m Taylor
Alessio and this is Jenny Hansen, and we are the co-chairs of the 2016
Senior Class Gift Campaign. The Senior Class Gift Campaign launched in
January and invited seniors to donate $20.16 in honor of our graduation year.
Donors were able to choose which aspect of Hopkins to support, designating gifts to
financial aid, academic research, and student life, to name a few. – [Ms. Hansen] We know that this
contribution is just the beginning of our class’ efforts to give back to the
university that has given us so much. Though we spend only four short years here
at Homewood, we spend a lifetime in the Hopkins community. On behalf of the entire
committee, we are very excited to announce that we have reached 59% class
participation, the highest senior class gift participation in Hopkins history. – Thanks to your generosity, we are proud
to present this check on behalf of the Class of 2016 to President Daniels in the
amount of $20,108.80. – Best of luck. – Congratulations. – [together] And thank you. – Thank you to our leadership and thank
you to all of you. I said thank you to the leadership just before the mic went off.
But of course, thank you to the Class of 2016 for this. – The deans will now present doctoral
candidates to receive their degrees. We ask the candidates to come forward
without delay. Interim Dean Mariale Hardiman will present the doctoral
candidates from the School of Education. – [Dean Hardiman] Mr. President, many of
your faculty and staff have watched your eyes light up when you walk into a school
and see children learning. We also know of your passion and support
for the work of educators, counselors, and public safety leaders. So
it is my honor to present to you individuals dedicated to making the world
better for children, youth, and the communities in which they
live. The candidates have been certified by the faculty of the School of Education
for their degree of Doctor of Education. I wish for them to live long,
prosper, and to publish. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and every
one of you and candidates unable to be present the degree Doctor of Education
from the School of Education for which you have been certified by the faculty,
together with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities
pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – Will the recipients of the degree just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Education. – This is always the danger of being
first. Before we continue with our conferral degrees, I want to pause briefly
to make a quick point. Commencement at Johns Hopkins is both
about the individual and the community. We’re all here to celebrate your receipt
of a degree, Yurong Chai, a candidate for the Doctor of Education.
But as much as I’m excited about this moment, I’m thinking about Diana Qiuyue
Zhao. Where is Diana? Diana, wave to me. Stand up. There she is. Okay.
That’s Diana. So Diana is going to be the last of our bachelor’s candidates here
today. So you understand my point. We’re all here at the start. My hope is
that we will all be here to celebrate Diana’s moment, even though it’s going to
take a while to get to that moment. I can understand what you’re all
thinking, particularly those of you who are going to come up quickly and get your
degrees. “I’ve got a few hours. You expect me to wait here to hang around
to celebrate for the last of the graduates to be acknowledged. What am I going to do
with that time?” So I’ve been thinking about this and I’ve been worrying about
this for the last year. So I’ve come up with some garden variety
suggestions. First, it seems that you’ve got some time now on your hands. You’ve
got your smartphones. Maybe this is the time that you stand back, sit down, and
confer that letter that you’ve been meaning to send to your parents and family
members thanking them for everything that they have done to bring you to this day.
Some of you may say, “But I think I can dash that off in 20 minutes.” I say, start
at primary school. Work from there. Parents may be thinking, “What do I do,”
family members might be thinking, “What do I do while I’m waiting for that
[inaudible]?” because you’re going to write it, and then press Send. I
would say, you wait in anticipation. When it comes, you read it and reread it,
and revel in it, because this is a really beautiful moment. Now, I’m still worried.
Some of you are saying, “But I think I can get that done within
the next hour or so. Then, what?” So then I say, your lives are very
active and they’re going to be even more active. This could be your last quiet
moment for years to come. So I say, contemplate. Relax. Take it all
in. You say, “I can do that, get the letter done, and I’m still going
to have time to spare.” I say to you, when all else fails, go to
freeclassicebooks.com, “classice” is spelt with an E. It has all of the world’s great
novels on it. You can download it in PDF. I say now is the time to start reading or
rereadingWar and Peace.That’s my suggestion. Stay for Diana.
Thank you. – Thank you. – Dean Fred Bronstein will present the
doctoral candidates from the Peabody Conservatory. – [Dean Bronstein] Mr. President, I am
pleased to present to you these exhausted and brilliant candidates who fortunately
had no idea what they were getting themselves into, and who have now been
certified by the faculty of the Peabody Conservatory for their degree of Doctor of
Musical Arts. – Thank you. By virtue of the authority
vested in me by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer
upon each and every one of you and candidates unable to be present, the
degree Doctor of Musical Arts from the Peabody Conservatory, for which you have
all been certified by the faculty, together with all the rights, privileges,
and responsibilities pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – For the Doctor of Musical Arts. – Dean Davidson will present the doctoral
candidates from the School of Nursing. – Mr. President, I’m honored and pleased
to present the brilliant, tested, relieved, and ready candidates
who’ve been certified by the faculty of the number one school of nursing for their
degrees of Doctor of Nursing Practice and Doctor of Philosophy. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and
every one of you and candidates unable to be present the degrees Doctor of Nursing
Practice and Doctor of Philosophy from the School of Nursing, for which you have been
certified by the faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and
responsibilities pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – Will the recipients of the degrees just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Nursing Practice. – Pamela Surla Milligan [sp] – For the Doctor of Philosophy. – Dean Klag will present the doctoral
candidates from the Bloomberg School of Public Health. – Mr. President, I am pleased to present
to you candidates who are dedicated to changing the world, protecting health, and
saving lives millions at a time, and who have been so certified by the
faculty of the Bloomberg School of Public Health for their degrees of Doctor of
Public Health and Doctor of Philosophy. – On your centennial. – In our centennial year. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and
every one of you and candidates unable to be present the degrees Doctor of Public
Health, Doctor of Philosophy from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, for
which you have been certified by the faculty, together with all the rights,
privileges, and responsibilities pertaining thereto. Warmest
congratulations. – Will the recipients of the degrees just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Public Health. – For the Doctor of Philosophy. – Dean Nasr will present the doctoral
candidates from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced
International Studies. – Mr. President, on behalf of the premier
school for the study of international affairs and the home of Johns Hopkins
University in Washington, I’m pleased to present to you names listed
in the program who have been certified by the faculty of the Paul H. Nitze School of
Advanced International Studies for their degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Unfortunately, they cannot be here with us today. I ask you to confer
the degree in absentia. – Thank you, Dean Nasr. By virtue of the
authority vested in me by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University,
I confer upon the candidates unable to be present the degree Doctor of Philosophy
from the Paul H. Nitze School for Advanced International Studies, for which they have
been certified by the faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and
responsibilities pertaining thereto. Thank you. – Dean Rothman will present the doctoral
candidates from the School of Medicine. – Mr. President, I am pleased to present
to you the candidates who have been certified by the faculty of the School of
Medicine for their degrees of Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy. – Thank you, Dean Rothman. By virtue of
the authority vested in me by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University,
I confer upon each of you candidate who is here, and the others who didn’t roll out
of bed, the degrees of Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy – I know they’re
working – from the School of Medicine, for which you have been certified by the
faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities
pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations, and particularly to our
candidate who is here. – Will the recipient of the degree just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Medicine. – For the Doctor of Philosophy. – Dean Schlesinger of the G.W.C. Whiting
School of Engineering will present the doctoral candidates. – Mr. President, I am pleased to present
to you candidates who have spent sleepless nights, have designed, have modeled, have
built, have tested, and have produced amazing solutions to engineering problems,
and who have been certified by the faculty of the G.W.C. Whiting School of
Engineering for their degree of Doctor of Philosophy. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and every
one of you and candidates unable to be present the degree Doctor of Philosophy
from the G. W. C. Whiting School of Engineering for which you have been
certified by the faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and
responsibilities pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – Will the recipients of the degree just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Philosophy. – Dean Wendland will present the doctoral
candidates from the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences. – Doctor of Philosophy translates as
“teacher of the love of wisdom.” Our wonderful and wise Ph.D. graduates
exemplify this trait in over 22 different disciplines, and are ready to tackle the
world’s biggest challenges in the way only a Hopkins graduate can. Mr. President, I
am pleased and proud to present to you candidates who have been certified by the
faculty of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences for their degree of Doctor
of Philosophy. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and
every one of you and candidates unable to be present the degree Doctor of Philosophy
from the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, for which you have been
certified by the faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and
responsibilities pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – Will the recipients of the degree just
conferred please come forward when your name is called? – For the Doctor of Philosophy. – We will now present master’s degrees,
graduate certificates, graduate performance diplomas, and
certificates of advanced graduate study candidates for the conferral of their
degrees. All of the degrees being conferred today are listed in the
commencement program. As the university’s chief academic officer, it’s my privilege
to present these candidates on behalf of the deans of their respective schools.
Would the master’s, bachelor’s, and certificate candidates from the Carey
Business School, master’s, bachelor’s, and certificate candidates
from the School of Education, graduate performance diploma and master’s
candidates from the Peabody Conservatory, master’s and certificate candidates from
the School of Nursing, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, the
Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the School of
Medicine, master’s and certificate candidates from the G.W.C. Whiting
School of Engineering, and the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences please
rise at your seats? – Mr. President, I am pleased to present
to you candidates who have been certified by the faculty of the Johns Hopkins
University for their degrees. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and
every one of you and candidates unable to be present the master’s degrees, graduate
certificates, graduate performance diplomas, certificates of advanced study,
or bachelor’s degrees for which you have been certified by the faculties together
with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities pertaining thereto.
Let’s give a warm round of applause as we commend these graduates
on their accomplishments. – Will the recipients of the degrees just
conferred please be seated? The deans will now present candidates for
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of
Science. We ask the candidates to come forward without delay. Dean Bronstein will
present the bachelor candidates from the Peabody Conservatory. – Mr. President, I’m pleased to present to
you the singing, swinging candidates who have been certified by the faculty of the
Peabody Conservatory for their degree of Bachelor of Music. – Before I do this, I
want to again make one more plug for Diana Qiuyue Zhao. You know? Diana, she told me
a lot of times she had to wait last in line and it was a downer. But today, it’s
going to be special. So remember our final bachelor’s candidate
this evening. Now, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Board of
Trustees by the Johns Hopkins University, I confer upon each and every one of you
and candidates unable to be present the degree Bachelor of Music for the Peabody
Conservatory, for which you have been certified by the faculty together with all
the rights, privileges, and responsibilities pertaining thereto.
Warmest congratulations. – We ask the recipients of the degree just
conferred to please come forward when your name is called. – For the Bachelor of Music. – Each of you is a vibrant and vital part
of the university community. Today, as we celebrate your achievements,
we also remember those who are not with us. Your classmate Rachel Reichner, a
fellow member of the Whiting School of Engineering exemplified this spirit of the
university, as do you. May your calm and commitment to
intellectual inquiry and devotion to serving others help guide us all as we
work to create a safer, finer, more humane world. – Dean Schlesinger will present bachelor
candidates from the G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering. – Mr. President, to paraphrase a
well-known adage, everybody talks about the future, but only engineers do
something about it. I am pleased to present to you
candidates who have been certified by the faculty of the G.W.C. Whiting School of
Engineering for their degrees of Bachelor of Science in an Engineering Discipline,
Bachelor of Arts in an Engineering Discipline, and Bachelor of Arts. – By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, I am delighted to
confer upon each and every one of you and candidates unable to be present the
degrees Bachelor of Science in an Engineering Discipline, Bachelor of Arts
in an Engineering Discipline, and the Bachelor of Arts from the G.W.C.
Whiting School of Engineering for which you have been certified by the faculty
together with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities
pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – We ask that the recipients of the
degrees just conferred to please come forward when your name is called after we
have recognized the graduates who are seated on-stage. Names will be called in
alphabetical order by degree. – We will now announce the names of the
engineering candidates and ask that they come forward when called. Beginning with
our on-stage candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering.
Leela Subramaniam – For the Bachelor of Science in
Biomedical Engineering. Amy Tong Sun. – For the Bachelor of Science in Applied
Mathematics and Statistics. Evan Adamo. – Stephen Johannes Johannesson. – Kimberly Ann Marowski. – For the Bachelor of Science in Chemical
and Biomolecular Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Civil Engineering. – Alexandra Maria Picano. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Computer Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Computer Science. – Joseph Pak. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Electrical Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Engineering Mechanics. – Alexander Huntington Griffith. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Environmental Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Materials Science and Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Mechanical Engineering. – Sydrake Abdi. – Alexandros Yan Bennick. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
General Engineering. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Applied Mathematics and Statistics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Computer Science. – Dean Wendland will present the bachelor
candidates from the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences. – Mr. President, engineers may do
something about the future, but it is the humanists, the social scientists, and the
natural scientists, and the artists who develop the rich intellectual life that
makes the future worth sticking around for. The great Class of 2016 has studied in
all fields from anthropology to writing seminars and everything in between, and
will be the creative force in solving the world’s problems. And as you just heard,
it has the most enthusiastic school spirit ever seen. I am pleased to present to you the
candidates who have been certified by the faculty of the Zanvyl Krieger School of
Arts & Sciences for their degrees in Bachelor of Science in an Arts or Science
Discipline and Bachelor of Arts. – Dean Wendland, you have a point. But I
just don’t hear enough enthusiasm from the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences. You’re getting persuasive. By virtue of
the authority vested in me by the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University,
I confer upon each and every one of you and candidates unable to be present the
degrees of Bachelor of Science in an Arts or Science Discipline and Bachelor of Arts
from the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences for which you have been certified
by the faculty together with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities
pertaining thereto. Warmest congratulations. – We ask the recipients of the degrees
just conferred to please come forward when your name is called after we have
recognized the graduates who are seated on-stage. Names will be called in
alphabetical order by degree, then major. – I will now announce the names of the
on-stage candidates and ask that they come forward when called. For the degree of
Bachelor of Science majoring in molecular and cellular biology,
Amanda Marie Lorrenco. – Majoring in neuroscience,
Kanami Mori. – For the degree Bachelor of Arts
International Studies, Nadine Amjad Abdullat. – Majoring in History of Art,
Taylor Alessio. – Majoring in Psychology,
Saman Baban. – Majoring in Political Science,
Jack Ives Bartholet. – Majoring in Public Health Studies,
Jennifer Hansen. – Majoring in Economics,
Maxwell David Willde. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Molecular and Cellular Biology. – For the Bachelor of Science in
Neuroscience. – Michael Dimao. – Jack McNulty. – Shuran Zhang. – For the Bachelor of Science in Physics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Anthropology. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Archeology. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Behavioral Biology. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Biology. – Barnabas Odeama. – Nester Fernando Valencia. – Irene Victoria Vargas. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Biophysics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Classics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Cognitive Science. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Earth and Planetary Sciences. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
East Asian Studies. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Economics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in English. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Film and Media Studies. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Global
Environmental Change and Sustainability. – For the Bachelor of Arts in History. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
History of Art. – For the Bachelor of Arts in History of
Science, Medicine, and Technology. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
International Studies. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Natural Sciences Area. – Ashley Katrina Paige Elsberry [sp]. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Near Eastern Studies. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Physics. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Political Science. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Public Health Studies. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Romance Languages. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology. – Kyle Spangler. – For the Bachelor of Arts in Spanish. – For the Bachelor of Arts in
Writing Seminars. – Sophie Ray Lacava. – Diana, I told you the class would wait
for you. Thank you. Thank you all for being here for all of this commencement
ceremonies. We’re almost at the end of these exercises. We have applauded our
graduates and their families, our trustees, our alumni, and our honorary
degree recipients. But I want to make sure that we acknowledge the peerless
contributions of one more group, without whom we would not be here today,
and that of course is our faculty. Under the guidance of these
extraordinary teachers and mentors, our students have thrived, turning out
their best work, often well more than they realized that they could accomplish. Could
the members of our faculty who are here with us please stand? To each and every
one of you, thank you. I also want to thank our deans,
administrators, and staff, without whom these proud graduates would not have
arrived at this moment. Of course, I want to recognize everyone, our staff,
volunteers, and those who work in security, and with the arena who made this
ceremony possible, and a special shout out to Maureen Marsh our Secretary of the
Board of Trustees who really sweat this event and brought us here for the first
time. Where are you, Maureen? You’ve got to stand up. She’s not going to
stand up. To our graduates from across the divisions of our university, while this
moment marks the end of your official tenure as Johns Hopkins students, it also
signals a start of a new kind of learning, discovery, and engagement with our
communities from Baltimore and Beijing, and beyond. Once again, to you, to your
families, congratulations and good luck. We’re so very proud of you, as I’ve said
so many times. Now, let me turn this back to Chief Marshal Lieberman to conclude
these truly joyous proceedings. – On behalf of the entire Johns Hopkins
community, it’s my honor to extend congratulations to all of our graduates
and their families. I have several announcements before we begin the
recession. Graduates, please remain standing at your seats until the recession
of the principles, officials, and members of the faculty is complete.
You will then recess in order and be directed to diploma pickup. Please follow
the directions of your marshals. The audience is requested to remain
standing at their seats until the recession of principles, officials,
members of the faculty, and the graduates is completed. Now, please stand and join
us in singing the new adaptation of the Johns Hopkins University Ode. The words
can be found on Page 18 of your program book. ♪ [music] ♪ – Thank you for joining us today.
Congratulations to all graduates and their families. This ceremony is now adjourned. ♪ [music] ♪