International Students Webinar Series, Predeparture, June 13, 2019

International Students Webinar Series, Predeparture, June 13, 2019

August 30, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– All right, so welcome again everybody, to the pre-departure webinar. So just a few housekeeping
items before we begin. So we do encourage
everybody to participate, be engaged, ask lots of questions, but we would ask if you
can use the Q&A feature. We will have a chat feature where we are going to
provide some links to you, but the Q&A feature is really the best way for you to ask questions, and we’ll either answer live, or we will respond by typing answers. So with our webinar, it is going to be recorded. However, the chat and
the Q&A are not recorded. So if we are posting links
that you are interested in following up further, I suggest maybe have a
Microsoft Word document or something open in the background so you can copy and paste
some of those links. So the first thing that we
are going to do to get started is we will start with some introductions, because we have a lot of
panelists here joining us today. So my name is Andrew Staples, and I am the Student Success Coach for international students. So I’m sure we’ll meet
once you arrive on campus, and if you have any questions
about transitioning to campus, or any other concerns that you
might have once you arrive, feel free to reach out to me. And so next I’d like to ask, maybe Ana, to join and introduce. Great, thank you. – Hi everyone, my name is Ana Pereira, and I am the Program Coordinator
for international students. – Great, thanks Ana. And Francesca? – Hi everyone, I’m Francesca, and I’m the Coordinator for
International Grad Students. So if you’re coming into
Mac for a Master’s or PhD, please feel free to reach out. – Great, thank you. And Jenna? – Hi everyone, so my name is Jenna, and I’m the Education Abroad Coordinator, working with our inbound
exchange students. – Great, thanks. And Lajipe. – Hi everyone, my name’s Lajipe, I’m the Immigration and Mobility Advisor, so I’ll help you with all of
your immigration questions which we’ll be talking about shortly. – Okay, excellent. So we are going to keep
you here with us, Lajipe, because we’re going to have you start talking about immigration. – All right, prefect. All right so today we’ll be talking about the study permit
application process, and pretty much all of the
documents that you need, how the process works, and then I’ll be answering
some of your questions as well. So for the study permits, one major question that we get a lot is when should you apply. You should apply as soon as you accept the offer of admission from McMaster. You can apply with a
conditional offer letter. There’s no problem with that. Now, if you’re applying through
the student direct stream, which we’ll also talk about shortly, then you need a formal offer letter. So in that case, you can’t apply
with the conditional offer, you have to meet the
conditions of your admission, and then apply. So sometimes people say, “Well, the conditions of my offer, “I’m not going to meet
it until much later.” So then my advice is not to apply through the student direct stream and just apply through
the regular stream, okay? So you can apply online, by paper, or through a Visa Application Centre. Online’s best, it saves
you time and money. Paper can be a very long process. For some countries, the
Visa Application Centre might be your best choice, so just research the information
online and see what’s best, but basically we invite
people to do the online route. Next slide please. All right, so what you need
to apply for a study permit. The first one is the proof of acceptance, so your offer letter or admission letter. People call it different things, but it’s the letter from McMaster confirming that you have
a spot in the program, or that you’ve been offered admission. So the next step is your
International Passport, and you’re advised that
your passport be valid for at least one year from
the time that you’re applying. If you need to renew your passport, renew your passport before
applying for the study permit, because your visa or study
permit cannot be issued past the date of the expiry
date on your passport. The next is proof of funds. So this is very important. You need to show immigration that you can afford your studies. And what they’re looking
for in the account statement or investment statement is at least one year of
school fees or tuition, plus 10,000 for upkeep. And then they want to see a flow of income to show that you can
afford the remaining years. But, for example, if you’re
in a four year program, then you don’t need to
have four years of tuition in your account, but you need to have at
least on year of tuition plus 10,000 for your upkeep. Another question I get a lot is how do you proof of funds? So you can do this by providing
your account statements. If you’re being sponsored by
a company or your parents, providing an account statement for them, and a letter confirming
that they’ll be responsible for your fees and your upkeep. You could also provide
investment certificates as well. Anything that shows
that you have the funds. Another very popular one if
you’re in a graduate program is if you have funding. So the letter confirming you
have funding for your program is also proof of funds, okay? Digital photo, the
specifications are listed online. It’s just a photo of your
face that you upload. You have to complete the
immigration form 1249, so that’s the Study
Permit Application Form. And that’s for all of
your basic information, information about the
school you’re attending. We do have a guide that we
can send to all applicants that walks you though
the step-by-step process of applying for this. The next one’s a Family Information Form. This one’s just, that’s for your parents, children, if you have any,
and siblings if you have any. Now, the medical check
and police certificate, if applicable, because not
everyone has to do those. Most medical check, I think
most countries have to. And there’s an easy way
to check that online on the immigration website. And so if you do require medicals, you would get an email from
immigration in your account, and it will give you the instructions on where to go for the medicals. Police certificate’s not really common. Again, that’s something
they’ll contact you to provide if they need. If you’re applying to the
student direct stream, again, we’ll talk about that shortly, and you need the medical exam, you need to do that up front, before submitting your application. With the regular stream you don’t have to, immigration will contact you if they need you to complete medical. Next slide please. All right, so the student direct stream. The student direct stream
is a faster process of getting your study permit. Right now it’s a pilot program, and it’s only open to legal
residents of China, India, Philippines, and Vietnam. So you have to be either a citizen… Well, if you’re a citizen
or a permanent resident, or have any legal stake in that country, you actually have to be living there. What that means is, if you’re a citizen of China, but you’re currently in Germany, you cannot apply through
the student direct stream. You can only apply through
the student direct stream if you have legal resident
and are currently living in China, India, Philippines, or Vietnam. So you need an official acceptance letter. What that means is that you can’t use a conditional offer letter. You need proof that you’ve
paid the tuition fees for your first year. So Ana’s just posted a
link in the chat there, about how to pay for tuition. Save that link if you’re planning to apply through the student direct stream. Save that link. Once you’ve made the payment, you email the student accounts, they’ll send you proof that you’ve paid and you can use that to
apply for your study permits. The other requirement is that you have a Guaranteed
Investment Certificate, also called a GIC, of
10,000 Canadian dollars. After I finish talking
I will post the link on information about the GIC, and what banks offer
that and how to get it. So that’s a requirement
from immigration, again. That they estimate that you need 10,000 to take care of yourself while you’re in Canada for one year. If you need a medical exam, you have to obtain that before you apply, and if you need a police certificate you have to obtain that before you apply. The last one is the English
exam or French exam. Next slide please. All right, so you have
to have a language result that shows a score of 6.0
or higher in each skill: reading, writing, speaking, and listening, for the IELTS, or at least seven for each
skill for the French exam, which is called the TEF. Now for both of those, so you can either do the IELTS or the TEF. Note that even if you do not
need IELTS for your admission, this is now, it’s a
requirement for immigration, if you’re applying through
the student direct stream. If you’re applying through the
regular study permit stream, you do not need to
provide English results, but if you’re applying under
the student direct stream, the you need to provide English results. I don’t want to confuse everyone, so I’m just going to make a
little bit of clarification. So there’s the regular student
permit that you apply for, and that’s open to everybody; anyone can apply under that. The student direct stream does not give you a special study permit, it’s the same study permit
that you are getting. The only difference is that
you can get the study permits under the student direct
stream in about 20 days. But in order to apply
through this fast process, you have to be a legal
resident of China, India, Philippines, or Vietnam. So everyone else, if that
doesn’t apply to you, you just apply under the
regular study permit stream, and everybody gets the same study permit, it’s just that this program
allows you to get it faster. Immigration’s working on
possibly expanding this to the rest, into a global thing, but there’s been no
information about that yet. All right, next slide please. All right, so for exchange students, I realize that there’s some
exchange students on the call. So you don’t need a study permit if your program is going
to be less than six months. That is, if you’re only
here for a semester, you don’t need a study permit. You would need either an
Electronic Travel Authorization, also called an eTA, or a Temporary Resident Visa. So eTAs are for people from countries, for example the United Kingdom, where you do not need a
visa to come into Canada. So if you’re from a country
that does not require a visa to come into Canada, you apply for an eTA. It’s an online application,
it’s linked to your passport, it’s valid for five years,
and you can come into Canada. If you’re from a country
that does require a visa, then you need the apply for
a Temporary Resident Visa, also called the Visitor’s Visa, or some people call it the Entry Visa. So you apply for that, and you can come in and study as long as you program
is less than six months; so you’re only here for a semester and you’re going back home, you don’t need a visa study
permit for that, okay? So you can still apply for a study permit if you want to be able to work
during your stay in Canada. So you would apply for the study permit, and you include a letter explaining that even though you
don’t need a study permit, you want to be able to
work while you’re here, and that’s why you’re
applying for one, okay? Now, if your program’s
more than a semester, or you’re here for a year or two years, then you need to apply for a study permit, and everything else that I
talked about does apply to you. Next slide please. All right, so tuition payments, just again, just going
over the information. Ana has posted the link for you to be able to
have that information. Make sure you save those things. Once you make the payment, you sent an email to
[email protected], and in the email include your
name, your student number, a copy of the payment receipt. Once the payment has reflected
in your student account, the letter will be attached
to the reply of your email. So note that this may not
be immediate for two things. One is that when you make the payment, it doesn’t reflect immediately, it may take some days for that to reflect in McMaster’s account. Second is that it’s a busy
period for the office, so we have a lot of incoming students who are all emailing and
trying to get this information. So don’t panic if you don’t
hear from them the next day. It may take a few days for them to get back to you, all right? Next slide please. All right, so after you apply, if you study permit
application is approved, a Temporary Resident Visa will
be issued on your passport, if you’re from a country
that requires a visa, or an eTA will be issued to your passport if you’re from a country
that does not nee a visa to enter Canada. So this is what allows
you to enter into Canada. You will then get a letter confirming that your
application has been approved. And so when you are entering into Canada, your study permit will be issued to you at the point of entry. So what you get when you
apply for the study permits is actually a visa for you to
be able to come into Canada, and then the study permit
will be issued to you at the point of entry. I’m going to stress the fact that when you get to the airport, make sure that you
receive your study permit from the officer, because we’ve had a few cases of maybe if you arrive
during a busy period and an officer doesn’t
issue your study permit, it can be a bit of a
hassle to get that paper once you’ve entered inside Canada, and you need to show that
proof that you can study. So make sure that you write it down to collect your study
permit from the officer at the point of entry; very important. Next slide please. All right, so this is an
example of a study permit. Like I said, it will be issued to you at the point of entry when
you’re entering Canada. Next slide. And this is what a visa looks like. So if you’re from a country
that requires a visa to enter Canada, this is what will be affixed
to a page on your passport, and this is what allows
you to enter Canada. We don’t have a copy of an eTA because it’s just an email that you get, and it’s an online thing, so it doesn’t come, like, it’s not fixed to your
passport or anything, it’s just an email that you get, and it’s valid for five years. All right, so just quickly, because I know people have questions about if they are allowed
to work in Canada or not. Typically when you apply
for the study permits, as long as you’re in a full time program, your study permit will have a line saying, “May accept employment on or off campus.” As long as your study
permit has this statement, you can work on campus, on campus means right near McMaster and any companies that have
business right here on campus, you can work there. Off campus you can work 20 hours per week during the academic year, so that’s anything outside of McMaster. And then during the scheduled breaks, such as the winter
holidays or summer holidays or reading week, you can work full time. Now, if you’re in a program that does not have scheduled breaks, you can’t work full time, you can only work 20 hours. So as long as your program is running, you can only work 20
hours off campus per week. You can’t do 15 the one week
and then do 25 the next week, it’s only 20 hours per week. It’s very important that you don’t violate the conditions of working. So for coops or internships, if you’ve applied to a coop
or an internship program, you can apply for your study permits and coop work permits at the same time, or you can wait ’til you’re in Canada and then apply for that. What this allows you to do is to work full time
during the school session, because immigration views
that as part of your studies. You can only get this work permit if you’re in a coop program
or an internship program, and you need a letter from
your program to confirm that. The postgraduate work permits
I’ll just touch on briefly. Most students, as long as
you’re in a full time program and you maintain full time status, will be eligible for a
post graduate work permit equivalent to the length of their program to a maximum of three years
after their graduation. And so I’m not going to touch much on this because the rules around it can change by the time you’re graduating, but that’s one of the advantages
of studying in Canada, is that you get that opportunity to stay and get work experience if you want to. Next slide please. All right, so what to
bring to the airport? You definitely want to
come with your passport, which would have your visa or the eTA. And then you need the
Letter of Introduction; this is the one that confirms that they’ve approved your study permits, and it has the reference number
which the officer will use to issue your study permits. You should also take a copy of your valid Letter of
Acceptance from McMaster. Proof that you have enough
funds to support yourself, so proof of funding,
scholarship, account statements, anything like that, because the officer may ask for it. And then letters of reference
or any other documents that the visa office told you to bring when you made your application. Next slide. All right, so we already
talked about the visa, or the eTA being linked to your passport, and it being on your passport. Next slide please. Oh, okay I think that’s all there. – Great, thanks, Lajipe. So we do have a lot of questions for you, however many of them, I think, are quite individual in nature. So for those who have asked questions, Lajipe will be able to
type out those responses. But we do have a couple
more general questions that I’d like to ask you. So for exchange students, you were talking about IELTS and tuition payment information. Do they need to present any of that data when they’re applying for a study permit or arriving to study? – For exchange students? – Yes. – Okay, so if they’re coming
here for just the semester, they don’t really need
to provide anything, they’re just applying for a
visa or an eTA to come here. Definitely you want to bring
your Letter of Acceptance, showing that you’re coming here to study. Then if you’re going to be here for a year then you need to apply for a study permit, and so in that case
then if you’re applying through the student direct stream, you do need to show proof of payment. But if you’re applying
through the regular stream, you don’t need to
provide proof of payment. So again, just to
differentiate between the eTA and the TRV. If you’re from a visa exempt country, what you apply for is an eTA, and if you’re from a country
that does not need a visa, then you apply for the
Temporary Resident Visa. – Okay, great. Another question, this would be more about
eligibility to work when you’re here. So can you do a freelancing
job while you are studying? – A freelancing job? In what context? – So probably working, I’m guessing, maybe on their own, or
sort of entrepreneurial. Is that allowed? – So that, I’m not sure that I’m qualified to give advice on that. If the freelancing job that you’re doing is in Canada though, I would be careful about that, because you’re still
guided by all of the laws. If it’s outside of Canada, I’m really not sure. I would stay away from
anything that’s a gray area. So when you come to Canada, you’re telling Canada that your
intention here is to study, so that should be what your main focus. As far as immigration’s concerned, if you’re currently studying, then you can only work
20 hours off campus. I would imagine that any work that you’re doing off campus then, you can only do 20 hours. I’m not 100% sure where
freelancing stands on that, so you might want to talk to a lawyer, or maybe call immigration about that. – Okay great. And I think just in the interest of time, we’re just gonna ask one more question, and then, again, all of
your questions, Lajipe, we’ll be able to answer by typing. So is the GIC sufficient evidence to support proof of funds on my stay? – Okay, so for proof of funds, what immigration’s looking
at is one, tuition. So for tuition it’s either, if you’re applying through
the regular stream, then you can either have that money in your account statement, or you can provide proof
that you’ve paid the fees. If you’re applying through
the student direct stream, then you have to pay the fees. So if you’re applying
through the regular stream, you either have the
money in your accounts, or you’ve paid the fees; either or. But if you’re applying to
the student direct stream, then you must have paid the fee, so that’s the first one. The second one is the GIC. So again, if you’re applying through the student direct stream, then they want to see that
10,000’s already invested, is in an investment, right? And that money will be available to you once you get to Canada. If you’re applying through
the regular stream, you only need to show that
10,000 in your account, you don’t have to do the GIC. The third thing that they’re looking for is a flow of income. So yes you have the
money for this one year, but they want to see how
you’re getting money. So, for example, if your parents are the
ones paying your fees, then maybe a letter from
their company where they work, showing how much they make, or a savings account. Or just something showing money coming in, so that immigration knows that by the time you are paying for your next year fees, you’re going to have
money to do that, right? So if you’re in a graduate
program, for example, and you have funding, then a letter from the school
confirming you have funding is enough for immigration to say, “Okay, this person can afford their fees.” If you’re only getting partial funding, then you want to have that
balance in your account, to show that you can
afford the rest of it. I hope that answers the question. – Yeah, that’s great. Okay, thanks very much Lajipe. And again, so everyone else
who has asked questions, we will answer all of them, it’s just in the interest of time we’re gonna do it by
typing, get the answers out. Okay, and so next I’d
like to invite Ana back, who’s gonna talk a little
bit about getting to camps once you arrive in Canada. – Thanks Andrew. So this year will be our second year that we’re running the
Airport Welcome program. So this program will
start from August first until September first. Please be aware that we are not there to physically put you on the
bus and drive you to campus, that’s not what the program is for. Basically there’ll be McMaster students, volunteers as you can see
there in the orange shirts. We’ll be wearing those orange
shirts with an orange sign, and we are there to welcome
you and to guide you. So you will be getting information on the different methods of transportation to get to Hamilton. And then once you arrive, you basically tell us the
way that you’ve chosen, for example, if you’ve
chosen to take the bus, we will show you where you
buy a ticket for that bus, and we’ll tell you how to get
that bus once you’re there. So we will be at the airport, at the Pearson International
Airport in Toronto, Terminals One and Three, just outside the
international arrival doors. So once those doors open, you’ll see us, we’ll be wearing those orange shirts and we’ll have the orange signs. We are there from 11:00 am to 11:00 pm. We will be asking you to provide
us your flight information. Again, we are not there looking for you, you are there looking for us, because we will not know when you arrive. So even though we have
that flight information, we don’t know who you
are, what you look like. So it’s just easier for
you guys to look for us. We’ll give you a little
postcard with some information, and then we will get you
on your way to Hamilton, or maybe if you’re staying in Toronto, we can also give you some information on how to get to downtown, or whatever it is that you’re taking. Next slide. So the different options for transit that you will be getting in an email soon. There is the Go Bus, and again, that leaves from Terminal One at the Pearson Airport. So if you land in Terminal Three, we will walk you over to Terminal One. Assist you in buying your ticket, so if you can have some cash with you, maybe like, $20, just so that you can buy a ticket. And then after we’ll tell
you where you have to stand to get to one of these buses. And then this bus comes
directly into Hamilton. There are stops along the way, and then it actually stops
at the actual center, main center, bus center here in Hamilton. Other options are Ubers, taxis, prearranged services from the airport, and then also if you’re going to Toronto, there is the local Toronto transit. There’s a Union Pearson
Express, and then also the TTC. So here for Hamilton we
have what’s called the HSR, which is the Hamilton Street Railway, and for that, as a McMaster student, you will get an HSR bus pass, and this is included in your tuition fees. So what this bus pass allows you to do is, any time you take a city bus, and there’s a picture down
there on the slide show that you can see, any time that you take a city bus, you will be given a Presto card, and you basically tap on and tap off every time you use it. And this is already paid in your tuition. So remember this is just for Hamilton, it is not for taking a Go Bus to Toronto, or to any other place, it is just for if you
are actually in Hamilton taking the HSR. – Okay, great Ana. So I think we’re actually, there aren’t any other
airport pickup questions, so we’re just gonna keep it going right into health insurance.
– Perfect. Okay, so as an international student, and this is for all internationals, and when I say “all” I
mean undergrads, grads, visiting, exchange, all. UHIP is mandatory as McMaster
University for students, and also for your dependents. So when I say “dependents,” it means children and spouse. So the coverage period every year will begin from September
first until August 31st of that academic year. And the dates effective for the UHIP plan, it is supposed to be September first, but as we know, some students who are starting
their first year at McMaster will most likely come a little
bit earlier to McMaster. So in this case, if you’re
coming in in September, your UHIP will actually be
valid as of August 10th, and you will not have a card at that time. So if you do have to
go to a doctor’s office or an emergency, they will most likely bill you or ask you to pay up front. And then you keep all those
receipts, you get a claim form, and then you submit it to
Sun Life after September, so that you can get
reimbursed for that visit, as long as whatever you were seen for is covered under the UHIP plan. So, for international students, it is something that is done
automatically every year. You do not need to come to see me if you are just a single
person on the plan. The system automatically will enroll you once it deems that you are
an international student, and that you are registered in courses. So starting in September 2019, the price will be $636 Canadian for 12 months of single coverage. For a student plus one dependent, so let’s say you and a
spouse, it’ll be 1,272. So now let’s say it’s you, a spouse, and a child, it’s 1,908. If you do have a spouse and
you have more than one child, so anything over three people on the plan does not cost you any additional money. So if you have three
children, four children, whatever it may be, you will not pay more than the 1,908, so that is the max for the plan. So every student will be
charged for 12 months, and that’s automatic. So for exchange students, and other students who
have a shorter time, even though if you go online, maybe now, let’s say if the charges
are already there, they will still show up as 12 months, but then as closer we get
to July and maybe August, I will manually change
those charges for you. But please always go onto
your student accounts, as it is every student’s responsibility to make sure that the
charges on there are correct. If you see something that is not correct, it is your responsibility to communicate with the administration. Supplementary coverage. So for undergraduate students
and any MBA students, they will be covered under the
MSU Health and Dental Plan. Exchange students are not
covered under this plan, so please be aware that
you will not be covered for things like prescription
medication, dental, vision, et cetera, et cetera. So that is just for students
who are under the MSU Health and Dental Plan. If you are a grad student, then you will have coverage under the GSA Supplementary Health and Dental Plan, and that is also aside from the UHIP. So having UHIP and
having the GSA or the MSU does not mean that you
have double coverage, you basically have coverage
for two separate things. So the MSU and the GSA will pay for things that are not paid for under the UHIP plan. So please, also be aware that you have to add your
dependents to both plans. Just coming to me to add
your dependents into UHIP will not automatically
also add your dependents into the GSA plan; they are two different plans and you have to inform
both plans of any changes. So that is what your
UHIP card will look like. So as mentioned before, you do not need to do anything
to get your UHIP card. So once you are enrolled
into Sun Life Financial, which is the insurance company that administers the UHIP plan, you will be sent an email
to your McMaster email with this card. So make sure you print that UHIP card and you carry it with you at all times, in case you ever have to go see a doctor. Very important as well, please activate your McMaster email, because only that email
will receive your card. If you have that email
forwarded to another email, you will not receive your UHIP card. And also, if your McMaster
email is not active, you will also not receive your UHIP card. So please make sure that your
McMaster email is active, and that it is not being
forwarded to any other email. I get the question a lot of exemptions. There are some students who do decide to purchase some plans before they arrive. Unless your plan is
listed on this list here, you will not be exempt from the UHIP plan. The UHIP plan is very comprehensive, and it was made to mirror
a Canadian OHIP plan. So residents of Ontario all have OHIP, and basically UHIP was
made to mirror that plan, so that you have equal coverage
while you’re here in Canada. So if you do have one of
those plans listed there, and I would need to have proof
from you as soon as possible so that we can exempt you from the plan. If your plan is not listed on there, most likely you will not
qualify for an exemption, and therefore you will
have to stay with UHIP. So quickly on UHIP and dependents. It is mandatory, as I mentioned before, to add your dependents to the UHIP plan. And you can only add them
once they’re actually here in Ontario with you. So for instance, if you
arrive in September, and your spouse does not
arrive until October, I cannot add the spouse until
they are physically arrived in the country. Many times travel plans are
canceled or things come up, so I am only allowed to actually
add them once they’re here. So you have 30 days to add your dependents from the date of their arrival. If you miss those 30 days, there is the $500 late fee add, and there also, you will be charged
retroactively for any months. So, an example, if you started in September and your family is here as of September, and you do not tell me until December, you will be charged $500 for the late fee, and then the UHIP fees will
backdate ’til September. So you’ll have to retroactively
pay for all those months that they should have been enrolled. My suggestion to you is, if you’re bringing your
dependents with you, you want them to have the
same privilege as you do, because nobody chooses to get sick. These things happen, it’s just a part of life, and you need to be enrolled and covered so that you have less stress. Health care in Ontario
is very, very expensive, and you do not want to
have to leave the hospital with a $20,000 bill and wondering who’s gonna
be paying for that bill. So please be proactive and add
your dependents to the plan. So again, to add the dependents, you can make an appointment on
OSCARplus to come and see me. OSCARplus is just a portal
that we have here at McMaster, where you’ll be registering
for a lot of events, and seeing job postings and all that. So you’ll get very familiar
with what OSCARpluser… Sorry. OSCARplus is. And you’ll also be getting
emails with that information. So as it says there,
what I would need for you would be the student number, the dependents passport photo page, and also their flight itineraries so I can add those dependents. – Okay great, thanks Ana. So we do have a few follow
up questions about UHIP. So one is regarding fees. So are the fees for UHIP
included in their tuition, or do they have to pay on top? – [Ana] So the UHIP fees will
be a charge that you will see in your student account. It’s not included under
the tab of tuition, it’ll actually be, if you actually go to
your student account, you’ll see things like,
tuition, MSU, UHIP, athletic, or whatever it is that you have to pay. So the fee isn’t in the UHIP portion, but there’s actually a line
there that will say UHIP, and it will be charged for
your overall student account. – Okay great, thank you. And then another student’s asking, “If I need to visit a doctor, “do I just need to show
the health card once, “and have it for the whole process “so the process would be cashless? “Or is there a list of
hospitals/clinics in the area?” – [Ana] That’s a fantastic question. So UHIP is, so if you do not have OHIP,
which is for Canadian citizens and permanent residents, everything is considered
a third-party insurance. So because of that we do have
preferred provider network, which means that if
you go to these doctors that are on this list, they will know what UHIP is and they will not charge you up front. They will sent the bill to Sun Life, and Sun Life will pay them directly. So we do have a Wellness
Center here on campus. So all grads and
undergrads can go to them, except for MBAs. MBAs are not able to see
a doctor here on campus, and also neither are family members; so it is just for students. So, for example, the Student Wellness is someone who’s on the preferred provider network, so every time that you
book to go see someone at the Student Wellness Center, you’ll have to show them your UHIP card and your student card
to make the appointment. They will then take care of the billing, and they will send it
directly to Sun Life, so you do not have to worry about that. If you do go to somewhere where they do not know what
UHIP is, that is still okay. You will bring a claim form with you. There is a section on the bottom that they will have to fill out, and all of that is then mailed
to Sun Life for processing. Once they accept it and it is processed, they will send you the money directly, because you’ve already paid the provider. Or, if you have not paid the provider, they will send the money to the provider. I know that was a lot of information. We do have workshops in September on UHIP and the different supplementary plans, so I highly suggest that
you register for those, and we will go a little bit
more into detail on the plans and how everything works. – Okay great, thanks Ana. So again, just like Lajipe, there’s a few more specific questions, so I’m gonna leave it to you to maybe just type up those
answers to the student. Okay, excellent. So next, there’s been a few
questions about orientation, and what the first few
weeks of campus are like, so we are going to talk
a little bit about that. And so when you arrive on campus, you might notice, especially
last week of August, first couple weeks of September, there’s lots of buzz,
there’s lots of activity, there’s lots of cheering and
people wearing jumpsuits, and all sorts of different colors. And we know, and from what we’ve heard
from international students, that this can be a
little bit intimidating, a little bit overwhelming. The idea is, this is sort of
a way to show school spirit and to get involved. And so we do really
encourage you to participate in the events that are available for you, if you’re undergrad, grad,
or exchange students. We will go over those in a little bit. But just wanted to sort of prepare you of what campus could be like, just so you’re not too surprised. So McMaster does have a football team, and so a lot of students will go out and actively participate by
cheering on the football team, which was demonstrated in this picture. As I mentioned, McMaster has a culture of, sort of campus leaders wearing jumpsuits, and these jumpsuits would
be in different colors. Some will represent different faculties, some will represent different groups that they are involved in. And here you go again, sort of a rally for, I believe this is the
Faculty of Engineering. So just be aware of this, that when you get to campus and you see all of this hustle and bustle, you know, we do encourage you
to come out and participate. We do know it can be a lot to take in. But just know that at McMaster
it’s very much a culture that if you have any
questions or concerns, you know, reach out to either
staff, student leaders, even the other senior students on campus, if you really have any questions at all. There are a lot of students arriving, both internationally and both from Canada, so it’s a really fun experience. We do encourage you to get involved. So I am going to actually
ask Ana to come back, and she’s gonna talk a little bit about some of the
programming that’s available for undergrad students. – Thanks Andrew. So earlier we were talking about the Airport Welcome Program, so I’m just gonna pass by that. Also there’s the Ignite Program. So this program is a pre-orientation
for first year students who will be staying on campus. And the program will run from
August 21st until August 23rd. Registration for this program
will be opening next week. So at this moment, if you have not made your
deposit for residence, and you do not have a spot, then you will not be eligible to participate in this program. So we will be sending out an invitation to register for the program. We will also be requiring
your flight itinerary. So the program will start August 21st and it ends August 23rd. There is no charge for
this program at the moment, therefore if you register and
we confirm your registration, it is expected that you
participate for all three days. If you do not participate, and you’re taking up someone else’s spot, because there are limited spots, you will be charged for not participating after being confirmed in the program. So please make sure that you understand that it is limited spots available, and it’s a great program, but please remember that if
you sign up for something, you are committing for something, you need to show up. There’s another program called the Hamilton: One Bite at a Time. And this program happens
first and second semester. And we take students out
into the Hamilton community, to different cultural restaurants. So Hamilton is actually booming
in different restaurants, in different cultural
restaurants especially. So we will go to different restaurants, we have a set menu that
I plan with the owner, and it’s very cultural. So we try Indian food, we
try Middle Eastern food, Italian food, Portuguese food, a whole bunch of different foods. And the cost of this
program is $20 per event. And that will get you appetizers,
main dishes, desserts, and one non-alcoholic drink. So it’s a great way to meet new friends and in a social aspect to
just talk and meet new people. So this program, again, is open to undergrads and grads, and also exchange students. And actually, Canadian students as well, they are able to
participate in this program. So next is the International
Student Buddy Program, and this is for first year
undergrad students only. So there will be, again, applications will be opened, I believe, next week or the week after. So we will pair you with
an upper year buddy. And we do the pairing
based on languages spoken, or hobbies, or interests,
or country of origin. So you might be paired
with a Canadian student, or you might be paired with an upper year international student. So the point of the program is for them to help you with integration into McMaster and into Canada. So many questions like
where do I buy my books? Or how was the weather there? Or what to expect the first week? Or any of that stuff. These upper year buddies
that are McMaster students are there to help you. Within the program there
will be a meet and greet where we will facilitate
an actual meeting, a very social meeting where you can actually meet your buddy, and then you can continue
connecting that way. And there’s also monthly
socials that will happen throughout the actual program
from September to April. We also have an IKEA trip that happens the first day of school, which is on September third. The IKEA trip will happen at 4:30 pm, and it is for all grads,
undergrads, and exchange students. So as you know, as you’re
coming from a different country, you don’t wanna waste those
kilos or pounds in your luggage with linens and things like that. So we do take you to IKEA where you can purchase a
lot of things for your room on campus or off campus. So registration for that
will open shortly as well. And again, you will start
getting some emails from us, either from me personally, or from the International
Student Services Office. So please make sure
you’re looking into those, because we will be sending
out lots of information on upcoming events that
you have to register for. Also, during welcome week, we do have our welcome week orientation for all undergraduate students. This is a mandatory orientation, and this is for students
who are on and off campus; it’s for all international
undergraduate students. And also that week we have a
Home Away from Home workshop, and McMaster Student 101 workshop. And those, again, are specifically for
undergraduate students during welcome week. We do repeat those two workshops, the Home Away from Home and the McMaster Student 101 workshop the first week of school, or sorry, I should say,
the month of September. And for those, grads are
also invited to attend, and so are exchange students, you are also invited to
attend those workshops. We also do workshops on UHIP, and they are specific
based on undergrad or grad. So there is one specifically for UHIP and undergrads and MBA students, because they have the MSU plan. And then there’s one for
UHIP and the GSA plans, so for graduate students. Also it’s not mentioned there, but we do have the iCent app. You will be receiving
information on this next week about downloading this app. So there’re two different
versions of the app. There’s one that’s specifically
for undergraduate students, and for that you’ll be getting
information directly from me. And there is also a
download for grad students, and Francesca can speak a
little bit more to that, because you will also
be downloading the app, but information will be a
little bit different for you. So again, lots of information we’re gonna be putting on the app with programmings, with deadlines, with things that are coming up, just to keep you on track. And there’s also a checklist. So when you’re packing, make sure you have your acceptance letter, or your study permit. There’s a checklist that you can follow. So it’s a very handy tool. So again, information on these will be all sent out next week, so start watching for
those emails coming in. – Okay great, thanks very much Ana. And so I think we will keep going. So from undergrad to
graduate I believe is next. So Francesca? There you are, great. – Hi, okay, so again, I’m the Coordinator for
International Grad Students. So I sit at the School
of Graduate Studies, I’m part of the Student Life Team. And I will be talking to you a little bit about what we have planned
for you for September. Okay, so we put together
a series of events during the first two weeks to help you familiarize
yourself with campus, with the campus community,
with the services offered here, available for you within our campus, and also outside, in Hamilton. And also, it’s an opportunity
for you to meet students, incoming students, international, and also domestic students,
and returning students, which is great because you get the chance
to ask them questions, they’ve been here for a while, and they love meeting you also. So I’m gonna talk to you a
little bit about our events, and one of them is the Resource Fair. It’s great because the
offices and departments, again, on campus and also
community organizations, are invited to this, and you get to come into the fair, it’s usually a two hour activity, it’s on an afternoon. This year it’s happening
on September third, so make sure you take
a look at our emails, it’s gonna be coming, all of our activities are gonna be coming from the Grad Welcome email
from the School of Grad Studies. And going back to the Resource Fair, you’ll have the chance to go around, look at all the tables, for example the Sports and
Recreation Center will be there, International Students Success Services, everything, Student Wellness. So there are a couple of
people that are gonna be there that you may need to approach at the beginning of your program because you’re interested in knowing a little bit about them, and there’s also gonna be resources there that it’s good for you
to know that these exist, so that when you need them you’re able to refer back to them. Then we also have the
Welcome to New Grad Students and Clubfest activity, this is also on an afternoon
during that first week. And here you’ll get to meet
all these different clubs going on around for
grad students on campus that you would be able to
join if you’re interested. We also have a family picnic. A lot of grad students, I don’t know if a lot, but some grad students do have their families
that come with them, and they have children, so we have a parent’s network. and it’s mostly ran by students. So during the family picnic
we’ll probably be talking to you a little bit about that, in case you want to join or wanna check their Facebook page and know what’s going on and wanna go and attend
some of these activities. Then we also have a Sobi
Bike Ride to the Waterfront, and this is in partnership with the Office of Local
Community Engagement here at Mac. The summer is a great time to be outside, so if you like to bike ride, this is something that we’re
inviting you to to join us. And most, okay no. So all of our events, I should have said this at the beginning, are open to domestic and
international students. These events are, again,
organized by the Student Life Team within the School of Grad Studies. So they’re open to all grad students. And not only new students
but also returning. Now, there is one specific event, which is the International
Grad Student Event, which is solely for
international students. And during this event you will have the chance to meet students from the International
Graduate Student Association. They will come out and will do this event in partnership with them. And again, you’ll have a
chance to ask them questions, and also to join them, know what they’re doing and
the initiatives that they have, and check out if you’d like to join them, or if you’d just like to get some additional information from them. There’s also the teaching
and learning forum by the McPherson Institute, and this is a really good activity for students that are teaching assistants. However, it is open to all grad students. So in case you’re not teaching right now, and you won’t be teaching here at Mac, but you may become interested
in teaching in the future, you can also attend; it’s open. And then we also have the
Planting Roots welcome for LGBTQI students and allies. And I wanted to go back to, Ana mentioned the iCents app. We’re working on this, and you will be getting
an email from iCent to register, so you can download the app. And you will have a lot of information that’s gonna be very useful within the four to six weeks
before you get to McMaster, and then for the first two
weeks after you’re at Mac. We’re gonna be featuring
a lot of the information that you would need in terms
to prepare to get to Mac, and also of the things
that you should be doing during those first two weeks. I think that’s, I hope I’m
not forgetting anything. Again, you will get an email to register. Some activities may require registration, but those are just a few, most of them you just come in. But you will be getting emails from us, so just make sure to watch out for those, and we’re looking forward
to having you here. – Okay, great, thanks very much Francesca. And so Annette did post the
event calendar for grad studies, sort of welcome week and
orientation type events. So please look at the
chat for more details. Okay, and next I’d like to invite Jenna, ’cause I know we have quite
a few exchange students joining us today. Great, thanks Jenna. – Awesome, so hi everyone. So just a reminder, my name is Jenna, and I’m the Education Abroad Coordinator working with our incoming
exchange students. So some of the events that
were mentioned previously in regards to the international students do apply to exchange like
Ana and Francesca mentioned, so if you wanted to do the IKEA trip, or participate in the UHIP workshops that are happening during the year, those are absolutely open to you. I saw some questions regarding Ignite, so that is just for the
first year international, and not for exchange. With that said, we do have lots of stuff
going on for exchange students for the fall and winter terms, depending on when you are coming. Some of this should be
repeated information, as we’ve been sending out emails regarding registration for these events, at lease regarding MOOSE,
in the last few weeks. So just a reminder that
the MOOSE exchange program is a four day outdoor orientation program that we’re running for exchange students. We’re gonna take you up to
Algonquin Provincial Park, which is one of the most
beautiful areas in Ontario. So if you like canoeing,
swimming, the outdoors, this is a great event to join in on. And really, the focus is on making sure that you have a chance to meet
the other exchange students that are on campus, and make some friends
before classes start. So the fall event will take
place August 26th-29th. And then we will have
our exchange welcome day, which is a bit more formal orientation, following the MOOSE trip, and so that’ll be on August 30th. If you are coming in our second semester, so our January term, there will be another MOOSE program that is more winter orientation focused. You’ll go out and do some
cross country skiing, stay in a cabin with
other exchange students, and again, an opportunity for new exchange students
to meet each other, and potentially some current
exchange students to meet, full year students to meet the
new January intake as well. And again, we will have
a formal orientation on January third, just to make sure that you are
ready to go for your courses that start on the Monday after. Another thing, just to highlight, and again, this would be in your emails that you’ve been receiving
from the Exchange Office, is that we have an exchange club that is a really great opportunity to continue to meet other
students throughout the year. They run different socials
and cultural events that you can take part in, go out and see the City of Hamilton, get to know both exchange students as well as domestic students. And they have a Facebook
page that’s pretty active. So if you’re interested in, again, reaching out to current
exchange students now, before you arrive, this is the website that we recommend to make those connections. If you have any questions
regarding these events, or if you’re having trouble registering just through our emails, let me know and we will
make sure you get set up. – Great, thanks Jenna. So we actually do have one question about the MOOSE exchange. Is is possible to bring friends with them, if they’re coming to Canada
to travel a bit with friends, and then they’re coming to school, are they able to bring
their friends with them? – [Jenna] No, I think the
answer to that would be no, and that’s just because we usually have a pretty packed program, so we would be prioritizing
the regular exchange students. – Okay, great, thank you. And so I just also wanted to mention, so all of these events, again, if you’re undergrad,
grad, or exchange students, doesn’t matter if you’re living
in residence or off campus, you are able to participate in these, and they’re not exclusive just to undergrad students in residence. All right, and so we’re gonna
keep Jenna on the camera here, and she’s gonna talk a little bit about bankings and phones in Canada. – Great, thank you. So as you are planning
your trip to Canada, probably one of the things you will eventually
start thinking about is, you know, your finances, and what are you gonna
do in terms of banking. And really, the answer depends
on what your purpose is when you’re in Canada. So I know for exchange students some of you may choose to
open up a bank account, especially if you’re
staying for the full year. If you’re here for a semester, it may not be worthwhile, ’cause you can usually use your home bank for most of your banking that you need, and so opening a Canadian
account isn’t really necessary. If you’re a degree-seeking
international student, meaning that you’re gonna
be here for four years, opening up a bank account
might be a better idea, just so that you’re not paying extra fees every time you withdraw money, and you also have a bit more flexibility in terms if you want to start saving in a Canadian bank account and
just makes things more easy. So it really depends on your situation in terms of your status in Canada, which route you’re gonna go
with opening a bank account. With banking in Canada, there is a bit of vocabulary
that you might come across, and most of it’s pretty self-explanatory. So for example, telephone banking just means that you’re picking up the phone and you’re calling one of our banks, and you’re talking to a
customer service representative, potentially about an issue with your bank, or to do a transaction. So that’s one option. A lot of banks have websites where you can do your online banking, meaning that you are
connecting with the bank through an online account that you set up when you open your bank account, and you’re making transactions
and paying bills online. With Interac, this is the name for how we send payments or money between financial institutions. When you’re making a direct payment, that basically means that
you’re using your bank card at some kind of merchant, or for some kind of service or purchase. An email money transfer is when you might be paying
a friend for borrowing money, so you’re transferring
money from your account to your friend’s account. A pre-authorized payment refers
to when you allow a merchant to withdraw funds directly
from your account, usually for a monthly bill. So this would be something that you set up with the merchants. It is completely optional to you. And just something that people do, mostly for convenience. But again, it’s really up to you if you decide to take advantage
of pre-authorized payments. So there’s different
types of banks in Canada that you might come across. The most familiar ones are
what we call traditional banks. So this is like TD
Canada Trust, RBC, CIBC. They’re the big banks in Canada that you would maybe recognize ’cause you see them all over the place. So they have lots of branch locations, meaning that they provide
in person service, so you can go and speak to
a real human face-to-face, and not just have to talk
to someone over the phone. And they usually have quite a
few different account options. So savings accounts,
general checking accounts, lots of different options
in terms of what you can do in terms of your banking. Direct banks would be the online banks, so a bank that is only
available over the Internet, and doesn’t have an in person branch. So usually the benefits of these are that you can have cheaper fees in terms of what accounts you pick up, but you lose the convenience
of having a branch where you can go in
and just ask questions. And credit unions are kind
of like an in between. They are like a traditional bank, meaning that they have in
person branch locations where you can go ask questions, but instead of being a
traditional customer, you’re seen as more of a shareholder; so your relationship with
the bank is a bit different. But with all of these banks you can access ATMs to withdraw money, it’s really just in terms of service what would be available to you. So in regards to the
types of bank accounts you might decide to open, again, if you’re not gonna
be in Canada very long, a checking account is
probably all you need, just for your day-to-day spending. There might be some monthly fees, but you’re not gonna earn interest on any of the money that
you have in the accounts. And so it’s really just a convenience of having a Canadian account
to do some basic banking with. If you plan to stay in Canada longer, you might choose to open
up a savings account. With this, you are not
really using this account for many transactions, because the purpose is saving your money, and the reason for that is that you get pretty good interest rates on a savings account, depending on where you go. But again, so savings accounts you’ll get interest on your money, whereas checking accounts you would not. So what do you need to
open a bank account? Generally some kind of ID, so your passport or a birth
certificate might be required. They might ask to see your study permit or a work permit if you have one. Usually a second piece of identification, maybe a driver’s license. And then you need some money to deposit, so at least a dollar,
to put into the account, and make the official opening. Okay, so switching over
to mobile phone plans. So again, another thing to consider when you’re coming into Canada, you know, many of you will
probably already have a phone, and you will just be
bringing that phone to Canada and signing up for some kind of phone plan when you get here. If you are gonna bring
your phone from home, make sure that it is unlocked, meaning that you’re gonna be able to pick up service in Canada. And so if you’re not really
sure what that means, maybe have a conversation with one of your home phone providers, just to make sure that your phone is ready to come international. In general there are three
types of phone plans. Bring your own phone,
where you just sign up for a mobile plan when you get here and kind of go month-to-month contract. You could choose to purchase
a phone when you get to Canada and sign up for a contract, which could be one or two years. The benefit of a contract
if you are gonna stay for a few years in Canada, is that usually you’ll get a
discount on your cellphone, so that’s why come people
might choose to go this route. Otherwise you can also do pay as you go, meaning that you put credit
on your phone plan in advance, and your phone works for as long as there
is credit on the phone. Once you run out of
credit you just top it up, and then you’re good to go as well. The price for phones, or sorry, phone plans in Canada does range, so it could be $25 a month for some very basic mobile service, probably not including any kind of data, or it could be up to $200, depending on how much data
you have with your plan. So it really depends
on what your needs are and what you choose to sign up for. There is a disclaimer here
that Canadian phone rates are some of the most
expensive in the world, so just be prepared for some sticker shock if you are, well, you are
coming from international. So before you purchase your phone plan, keep in mind that there are
lots of locations around campus that have free Wi-Fi service, so you may not need to have
that much data on your plan in order to access and have
all the services that you need. So Wi-Fi is available on campus, it’s gonna be in your residence. Most student housing would
have some kind of Wi-Fi service already set up and you’d just
be kind of tapping into that with part of your rent. And the airport also
has free Wi-Fi as well. So in most cases you’re not
gonna need too much extra data, except for kind of traveling
outside of these areas. Another thing to keep in mind is that data in Canada is with
3G and 4G and LTE networks, so we’re not quite at 5G. So just a reminder in terms
of the speed of the plans that you would be getting here in Canada. So where can you get a phone plan? There are some limited options
at our campus bookstore, which is on campus. You can pick up a SIM card, but that’s kind of about it. So I’d recommend that you really think, or explore some of the other options, like Westdale, which is
the nearby neighborhood where there’s some different stores that offer cellphone plans and cellphones. Jackson Square is the downtown mall where there would be more
options to purchase a cellphone and a cell plan. And University Plaza
is another smaller mall that’s down the road towards Dundas area, and they would also
have different providers that would offer phone plans as well. So it really depends on
what you’re looking for, if you’re looking for
a particular provider, where you might be going
to purchase your plan. But all options are
relatively close to campus that you could access by foot or by bus. So what do you need to sign up? Probably your Canadian
address once you arrive, and probably some photo identification and a valid credit or debit card. But they would let you
know as you’re signing up, and you could also probably
find this information online before you go. – Okay great, thanks very much Jenna. I don’t think there were
any specific questions about either of those, so yeah. Okay so last, we’re just gonna briefly talk a little bit about sort of what to pack
and what to bring with you when you do come here. So it is really, really important, because we understand that you’re sort of picking
up your life and moving here, and there’s probably so
much you want to bring, but be aware of what weight
and size restrictions different airlines have. There’s nothing worse than
showing up to an airport and then either having
to throw things out, or being overcharged
because you’re overweight. So please just make sure that you know what those restrictions are. Similarly, coming into Canada, they are quite strict in
terms of different products that you can bring in, such as food or wood products, just sort of to protect
our own agriculture. So please, if you have any questions about what you are gonna bring, there is a link in the chat right now to the Canadian Border Services Agency. It’s also important to bring
all the documents that you need on your carry on. And the reason we say that is, you know, if you put things in your luggage, and then maybe your luggage
gets on a different flight, and it’s a couple of
weeks ’til you get it, all of that really important information, you do want to have
with you on your person. And we’d also suggest
bringing vaccination records. So you know, hopefully when you come here you will be healthy and you
won’t need any medical service, but life does happen, and so it is good to have those
vaccination records with you that if you are meeting with a doctor that you can sort of share
what you are vaccinated for. We’d also recommend bring a change of
clothes in your carry on, as well as any medications, again, just in case your checked bag does get misplaced briefly. We encourage you to bring
sufficient Canadian dollars to get you through any
initial purchases or expenses. You could use ATMs when you do arrive, but again, because you haven’t
opened a bank account here, the fees to use an ATM, probably the local ATM here
in Canada will charge you, and then your home bank will charge you, and then there’ll be interest rates. So it’s probably best to bring some Canadian dollars with you. And we’d also recommend,
it’s just good practice to, you know, start now,
create a packing list, because you don’t want to be
halfway on your flight here and realize that you forgot
something really important. So as Lajipe indicated earlier, please make sure that you bring all of the required
documentations with you to arrive and enter Canada. If you need any medications, please make sure that you
have the proper documentation. So you know, if you’re
bringing a bottle of pills, make sure that it’s properly labeled. If you have prescriptions to accompany it, just to make that
transition through customs smoother for you. You might want to bring
some toiletries with you for a couple of days. Again, once you are here, those are things that you can purchase. So in terms of clothing and what to wear, there is no dress code for
the most part on campus. Now, some business
students and MBA students may be required to dress up for classes or for presentations. But for the most part there
is no dress code on campus, and I would say students
dress fairly casually. If you are coming from an area that has a cold winter similar to Canada, then you might want to bring
winter clothes with you. But if you’re from a region of the world that just doesn’t experience -15, -20, – 25 winters with lots of snow, it might be better, actually, to purchase Canadian winter clothes here. Just to make sure that when you are here, that you are properly warm
when you’re going outside. Because it does get really cold here. Also recommend that you bring a few items to remind you of home. You know, being away from
home can be quite difficult, and sometimes you might feel homesick. So sometimes it’s nice to
have a couple of mementos to remind you of family and friends. If you’re bringing a
cellphone or any electronics, please be aware that you’re
bringing the proper adapters. So the Canadian plugs 120 volt, very similar to what an
American plug looks like. So just make sure that you’re bringing the
appropriate adapters. Things that you can buy here that we’d probably not
recommend that you bring. Anything really heavy and bulky. So, you know, we hope you’re
not bringing any furniture, any major kitchen items, household items. Those are things that,
again, with the IKEA trip, or you can take a taxi to different places once you’re in Hamilton, to purchase. Now, you can bring food from home, as long as it passes through customs, but I know from my experience
when I’ve had family visit me, you know, sometimes they fill
a suitcase full of food from, some part of my family’s Korean, so a suitcase full of kimchi, not knowing that you can actually
buy kimchi here in Canada. So just, if you really,
really have a specific food that you want to bring,
maybe bring a couple items. But for the most part, Canada’s a very multicultural country, and so you can probably
buy a lot of food from home here in the grocery stores. And so those are some stores in Hamilton, if there’s nothing in Hamilton, then sort of further a field, you would be able to find them. If there is items that you want to bring and you’re going over
your luggage restrictions, you could always look into shipping. Shipping within Canada is
really, really expensive, but shipping from other parts of the world might not be as expensive, so you could always look
at that as an option. And then for those of
you that have a buddy, this is a great opportunity for you to sort of start that conversation. What do I need to bring if
I’m living in residence? Or if I’m living off campus? What can I buy? Maybe your buddy can even
go and check out some stores to see if maybe they have
the right food for you or things like that. So if you are paired with a buddy please make sure that you
do ask these questions. Okay, so we do have some
other upcoming webinars that we would encourage
you to participate in. So next week we do have a
question of Life in Hamilton. So I know there’s been a few questions about getting around campus, the distance between buildings, what does campus look
like, is there a map? So we’re actually have a webinar just dedicated to living in Hamilton, and living in the city. So please, I’m not gonna
answer those questions, ’cause I’d like you to
tune in next week with us. And then we do have a few
others in July and in August. So thanks very much to our panelists and to all of you for
logging in and attending. We will stick around for
another minute or two if there are any questions. But again, thanks very much. And as a reminder, the chat
and the Q&A is not saved, so if there is anything, start taking screenshots now, because we are going to
end the webinar shortly. Okay, thanks very much everybody. And now we’ll just answer a few questions. Okay, so I’ve got one,
I think here for Jenna. So exchange students, do they still get a bus pass even though they’ve paid their tuition to their home university? – [Jenna] Hi, so yes, exchange
students do have access to the HSR bus pass. So even though you’re
paying tuition and your fees to your home university, you get access via our outbound students. – Okay, great, thank you. And then we have a question here about if they missed the webinar, so we did have a housing
webinar previously, and so we are working on
getting those recordings up. And so I’ve been told
probably by early next week we should have the housing webinar up, so you will be able to watch that. Okay, so it looks like the questions have sort of slowed down. So again, thanks very much everybody. We are going to end the webinar now. We look forward to seeing
you in the next webinar, or if not, on campus when you arrive. Okay, bye bye!