International Students Webinar Series, Housing, May 14, 2019

International Students Webinar Series, Housing, May 14, 2019

August 25, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– Okay, so welcome everyone and thank you for joining us today
for our first webinar. Today is the first
webinar, as I mentioned, and we will talking about living on campus and off-campus at McMaster University. So, before we start, I
just wanted to let you know some housekeeping rules. So, if you have any questions, please. You can send us your question
on the tab at the bottom where it says question answer. We will be answering those questions throughout the presentation. So whether you’re speaking
about on-campus or Residence, if you have any questions at that time, please write to us and we
will answer your questions. I will try to address
as many questions live, just so everyone can get those answers. But if they are repeated
questions, we do have some staff behind the scenes that will
be answering those for you. So again, for question answers,
we will be addressing them throughout the presentation
and again at the end, and just leave them in
the question answer box. Please remember that this webinar is about on and off-campus, so
please keep the questions to on and off-campus. We will be staying on topic. We do have a bunch more
webinars that will be discussing other topics that will be coming up, so we do invite you to join us for those, and we will be posting that
information a little bit later. So before we begin, we would like to know who’s joining us today, so please. You’re gonna see, now on your screens, there’s gonna be a poll
that will be posted. If you can just take a
minute to answer that poll and then we will continue
once we have some answers. I think that’s good. Are we good, Andrew? Perfect, okay. So my name is Ana Pereira and
I am the Program Coordinator for Undergraduate International
Students at McMaster. With me today I also have
Jennifer, and she will be speaking about off-campus options, and
we also have Jerry, who will also be talking to us about
our Residence and on-campus. So for, Andrew, do you mind
hitting the next slide? Thank you. So, we’ve done introductions
and, like I said, today’s webinar will be
about on-campus housing. You’ll get some information on Residence and also off-campus housing. And again, please drop us a
question on the question answer, and we will get to it
throughout the presentation and then again at the end. So, we thought that we
would start with a video. This video was completed
this year, and it hosts a lot of international
students, so every person that you see in the video,
except for the City of Hamilton worker and then another
one of our colleagues, they’re current and/or past
international students. So this video is a little
bit about Hamilton, and possibly your new home,
so I hope you enjoy it. Let’s check it out. (people chat) (uplifting music) – Hamilton, I’ve seen like
over the last six years, to an incredible evolution
of the city, actually. – We have a vibrant cultural scene. We have a vibrant art scene. – So you have people from
different backgrounds, different cultures and it’s
such a friendly environment. – There’s this wave of this
younger generation of art. It brought this really
young feeling to the city and a very stylish feeling to the city. I absolutely feel completely at home in Hamilton and this city. (uplifting music) – As an international
student, I felt so welcomed. – I’m a student from Portugal. First time I was actually having a North American experience. – It’s a pretty amazing
time to be working for the City of Hamilton. I realized that Hamilton
was a place where, if I really wanted to make
a mark, I can do that here. – I found people from, like, Nigeria. I found people from other countries, so it was very easy for
me to kind of fit in. – Hamilton is the middle ground between a city and a suburb, and
that’s what I was looking for. – You have the makings of a big city, but the feeling of a small town. (uplifting music) We have this awesome
ability to say we wanna buy local, shop local, support local. – Lots of coffee shops
and convenience stores and restaurants. This city, you really need
some time to actually explore and know, and there are
regions like James North area, where there are, like, small
villages inside the city that are very, very pretty and very homey. – I love the Harbourfront,
it is so beautiful. Just clears your head up, because you’re just sitting there and you’re looking at
things and you’re like I think I know what my next step is. (uplifting music) – We have a sense of I
can make things happen, but I can contribute to
something bigger than myself and make something bigger, better. – Find like their spot and
feel like this is my new home. – The more you see, the more
you’ll be able to relate with something that you saw back home, and it’s gonna hit you and
it’s like, this is home now. This is it, this is my place. (uplifting music) – So I hope you all enjoyed that video and got you a little bit
more excited about Hamilton and your possibly future home. So Hamilton is a wonderful city. There’s about 600,000
residents in Hamilton. We are very close and there’s
easy access to highways and trains and buses, so we’re
basically right in the middle between Toronto and Niagara
Falls, so it’s fantastic. You can go to Toronto on a
weekend and Niagara Falls. You are very close. Obviously by car. You cannot walk it. It might take you a few days to do that. So Hamilton is also known
for its growing art scene, great restaurants, a great
presence for cultural restaurants here in Hamilton, and also
very many beautiful waterfalls, so we are known as the waterfall capital. We have over 100 waterfalls
here in Hamilton, so I do encourage you to
explore, when you have a chance. So, moving right along. We will be talking to Jerry, who will go over living on-campus. So Jerry, thank you. – Hello, hi there. So for our first year
guaranteed Residence students, we’re going to be
talking primarily towards first year guaranteed Residence students. So I live in Residence. So living in Residence provides
many perks for students and can be a really
amazing way to transition and adjust to your new university life. So living in Residence
offers, like, academic and social benefits, as well
as a sense of community, especially if you’re a part of
a Living Learning Community, an LLC, which I’ll touch on in a moment. So, here at McMaster we
understand living kind of extends beyond further than the
classroom, and living in Residence is a great way to allow
students to gain life skills that will be useful later
in life in other avenues. So I’ve had a few
questions regarding safety. So, for student residents,
they have 24/7 access to support staff, as well
as community advisors on each floor who can provide
personal advice and support. CAs are upper year students,
former Residence students who can help you with any
university questions you may have. As well, every Residence
building has key card entry, and every Residence
room has a secure lock. Cameras are also installed
in main areas, and CAs will check in all students and
guests entering buildings from 9 pm to 3 am on
Thursdays and Saturdays. So at McMaster we have a
variety of different room types. We have traditional
double-style rooms as well as apartment and suite-style options. The traditional style
is usually referred to the double rooms where students will share a space with
another individual, but will have their
own individual twin bed their own individual desk,
dresser and wardrobe. Washrooms, common rooms
and kitchens are located on every floor and these will be shared by all of the students in that type of Res. For the apartment and suite-style rooms, these come typically in
four and six bedroom units, shared within a single apartment unit. So, students will enjoy
their own private bedroom, but will share the washroom,
kitchen, common area and living areas with the rest
of their apartment roommates. So at McMaster we have
about 74% of our room spaces are traditional-style bedrooms, so we suggest you be prepared
to live with a roommate, and it’s a really great experience. If you’re interested, on our
website at Housing.McMaster.ca, we’ll have information
about each room type and as well as their matching floor plans. So some important dates to keep in mind. Once you’re been accepted to
McMaster, in your offer letter, it will state whether or not
you’re guaranteed Residence, and if you are, you need to submit your online application along
with your $600 deposit by June 3rd, 2019 at 4:00
pm Eastern Daylight Time. If you have a student
accommodation request to be made, the deadline for that is June 10th at 4:00 pm Eastern
Daylight Time as well. So Residence room assignments
will begin in mid-to-late June and move in weekend is
Saturday August 24th and Sunday August 25th. Residence Admissions will
be sending out information on how to apply for early
arrivals, so it you cannot make it during your assigned
move in date and time, or have a pre-booked flight,
we accept early arrivals as early as mid-August, but
more information will be coming out soon, so please stay
tuned to Housing.McMaster.ca and plan your flights accordingly. In December, we expect
Residence students to move out. However, we do understand
that many students do not have the opportunity to go home
for the holiday break, so for a small fee of $385,
you’ll be allowed to stay over the December break, and
this includes access to your Residence buildings, access
to your CAs and access to an on-call Residence
Life Area Coordinator. We’ll also be running
programs and activities that are planned over the
break to keep the community connected and just have some fun with who is still available on campus. So if you’re interested
in this option, you can make a request as you’re
applying for your Residence. So for accommodations, if
you require accommodations for a medical disability
or a religious need, you can fill out your
accommodations request as you’re filling out your
Residence application, but keep in mind that you will be asked to submit supporting, attesting
professional documentation when filling out your request there. So for our Living Learning Communities, at McMaster we have about 10
Living Learning Communities, also known as LLCs, to choose from. These are typically communities that share interests or hobbies. So for example, we have
an e-sports and gaming LLC and a health and wellness LLC. These are great ways
to meet other students that share similar interests,
and by joining one, you get to participate in
a variety of themed events that are planned with
your interests in mind. So, for Residence fees, during
your first year, we expect you to budget everything from
textbooks to transportation. Students are responsible for
paying the full Residence fee for their room, and these
fees may vary by room type, but you should budget
between six to $9,000 for the entire academic year,
so from September to April. As well, hospitality
services also requires that all students living in Residence have a meal plan as well. So meal plan selection is completed while you do your Residence
application online, and can cost anywhere
between three to $5,000 for the academic year. Some other costs to consider as well. We do offer programming
opportunities that you can opt in for additional fees, if you’re interested. Some of these include
intramural sporting events, off-campus field trips. We also offer room cleaning
services that you can purchase a variety of packages,
depending on your need, your cleaning needs. We also have an in-Residence
laundry facilities, so on move in day you will receive a card that you can load with money in order to take advantage of
these laundry facilities. For fridge rentals, at McMaster we do rentals through Coldex, so if you would like to
have a fridge in your room, you can make that request, and the fridge will be placed in your
room prior to move in, so you don’t have to deal
with the fridge at all. And for on-campus
parking, if you do choose to bring a vehicle to campus,
just be sure to purchase a parking pass through parking services. So we’ve also had some questions about people that are not guaranteed. So just don’t worry,
there are a lot of options for accommodations, so you
can apply to the Residence waiting list, as spaces may
open up over the summer. We can also connect you
with our off-campus housing listing service to find
off-campus accommodations, and there’s also the Mac/One program that will pair you up
with a Residence LLC, meaning that you’ll get to
experience the same events and meet other Residence students as if you were also living in Residence. So if there’s anymore
questions for information about on-campus housing at McMaster, please visit our website
at Housing.McMaster.ca. Thank you. Hi Jerry, so I’m actually,
we have a lot of questions coming in, so we are gonna
try to address some of them as best we can. So one of them says hi, I’m in for the graduate
studies, September 2019. Actually wait, I’m gonna skip this one. Um. From what I understand,
for on-campus housing, we do have a list of choices to make, and I would like to
know if it is better put the first choice that we prefer
or the more accessible one. – Sorry, could you repeat the
second half of that question? – So, I’m not so sure
what this one’s asking. I know that they’re comparing
their first choice versus their accessible choice, so
I’m not so sure if this student is referring to if they
need accessibility services. Are all Residences accessible
or is this one over the other, or how would you, what
would you say for that? – Um so, we suggest that
you apply in order of, like, accommodations, so if you
do need accommodations, to plan with that, like,
ahead, just so that you have that as your first choice. – Perfect. Um, if we are accepted
in the on-campus housing, are we allowed to refuse? – If you’re accepted to on-campus housing? You are, you’re allowed
to decline your housing. – Perfect. Um, can that students stay
for just the first four months or is it when your commitment,
or in this case eight months? – So it is a one year commitment. It’s the entire academic year. Usually, we only do part-time
if it’s an international or exchange type program. – Great. Is vegan food available in Residence? – Is vegan food available?
– Mhm. – I believe Bridges and The Phoenix? There are a couple options for
vegan, for vegetarian, halal and other dietary needs on-campus. – And just to add to that
also, the Residences do have kitchens, so you are able
to make your own food. What Jerry has mentioned
in terms of Bridges and The Phoenix, those are
restaurants that are on-campus. And there are also other
restaurants that are on-campus that you can access some food. But again, the Residences
are built with kitchens that you can cook your own food. Uh, let’s see if we have any other ones. Okay, so I just answered this one, so I’m gonna keep on going. Uh, what is the mixed-gender housing like? – So, for mixed-gender housing,
your room will be shared with the same gender, but the floor will be a combination of, mix of genders. – Great. I think we might have more, but
I think I’m gonna keep going just because I know Jen
has a lot of information, so we will get to some of
your questions as well, probably just by typing them to you. So, to move on, we now
have Jen, and she will be talking to you about living off-campus. So Jen, whenever you’re ready. – Thank you, Ana. Hi everyone. My name’s Jennifer and I manage the Off-Campus Resource
Centre here at McMaster. So, for many of you, you
will be living off-campus, so we’re gonna talk about
the options available to you. First of all, we wanted
to explain to you a bit of the terminology that
you might see in some of the advertising postings on our website. Utilities. Utilities refer to heat
costs, electricity costs, costs of water, internet
or cable television. Sorry, I should say water,
electricity and heat, but internet or cable television are usually not included in utilities. They are sort of a separate
category on their own. As far as furnishings go, we talk about furnished, unfurnished,
partially furnished. Most rooms or apartments are unfurnished, meaning that you will have to buy your own bed, desk,
dining table, et cetera. Some situations do provide these
basic furnishings, however, but they might cost you a
little bit more money to rent versus an unfurnished room. We also use the term co-ed
often, and for us co-ed is used to describe a situation
in which males and females live in the same apartment or house. They share common spaces, such
as kitchens and bathrooms. You might be able to find
all female or all male living situations, but you’ll have to look for those details within the ad. If you come across the
word sublet or subletting, this means that someone
holds a lease, tenant holds the lease with the landlord,
but is renting out their room on a temporary basis to someone else, and so if you’re that someone else, you become the subtenant to the
tenant and you would have to sign a sublet agreement with the tenant. So there are a number of
different places to search for housing if you’re coming to Hamilton, but honestly, the best
place to start your search is on our website, which is
MacOffCampus.McMaster.ca. The people that choose to
list with us on that website have paid a fee to advertise with us, but please note that this does not mean that these landlords
are completely reliable. We do not go out to view
the houses or apartments. It’s very important that
you see the property for yourself before you decide
to sign a lease agreement to make sure that it’s
the right place for you. You can use other sources, some of which I’ve referenced here, but
you will have to be careful to check its location on a map. Be sure of where it is in relation to the main McMaster campus. So looking at our website
specifically, MacOffCampus.ca, this gives you a visual of what
the search page looks like. You will first need to
choose a category, and then you can see what advertisements
are under that category. For most of you, I would
suggest you start with student rentals, or if
you’re a graduate student, you can look under grad,
faculty and staff rentals. If you’re coming for just four months, you might also choose to look
under the sublets category. For grad, faculty and staff
listings, the people that are posting there are generally
looking for more mature individuals who are looking for
quiet, studious environments in which to pursue their studies. This slide shows you what
the next page looks like when you click on a category. These are little summaries. Each of those boxes are little
summaries of each of the ads. You’ll notice that each ad
may fall into a different subcategory, such as
bedroom in a student house or a student house (full house available) or a student high rise apartment. There are other subcategories,
but pay attention to those. You don’t wanna waste your
time looking at categories that aren’t really relevant to you. For instance, student house
(full house available) means that the landlord is looking
for a large group of students to fill the house, so
probably doesn’t want to rent just one room to you alone. You can also quickly see what date the unit will be available. Some will say available
now or maybe at the start of a specific month, but
in most of your cases, I’m sure you probably don’t
want it until September 1st, so you might look at those ads primarily. The next slide. The next slide shows you the full details of the left hand sidebar, as
seen on the previous slide. By choosing different
subcategories and other details, you can narrow down the
results of your search to better suit your specific needs. For instance, in this
example, I have asked to find only one bedroom apartments
in a student house, and in zone one, which is
within walking distance of the campus, and available
as of September 1st, and those that include the cost of heat, electricity and water. You can see that you can
really narrow down your search by using these subcategories to search in. If you see an ad summary
that you’re interested in, click anywhere in that rectangular box and that will take you to
this next level of detail. This is an example of one of
those ads, and you can see there’s a lot more
description here in this view. This allows you to see all the
information available to you. You’ll see extra details
in the description section. This is where you might see,
somebody might say in here that it’s a co-ed house
or an all-female house. It gives you a little bit more of an idea of what else you might
find in that property. Next please. At the bottom of that ad,
if you scroll down the page, you will come to the
contact details for the ad. You can contact the
landlord directly either by the phone number that they
provide in the ad or through the email dialogue box found
at the bottom of the page. Sometimes they don’t want
to receive phone calls, sometimes they only want
to be contacted by email, so you might only see that, or sometimes people don’t have
email, only phone numbers. When you’re emailing them, let them know that you’re
an international student coming to McMaster in the fall. If possible, let them know
the year that you’re entering and which program you’re going
to be studying in so they are more confident that you
are a legitimate student. Another option is to,
if you have Facebook, you could register and
be part of this group called the McMaster
Student Housing Postboard. This is not an official
McMaster University page. It’s not run by my office. It’s strictly a student-run
page where people can put ads up if they have a room available
in their student house. It’s a free option for them, whereas for our website, you have to pay. So therefore, this might
be a different place they might want to advertise. Likewise, when you register and if you become a member of this group, you can also put messages on there saying that you’re looking
for a place to live, and then people could reach out to you and let you know if they have something. The ads on the Facebook
group may not be as detailed as the ads on the McMaster
website, simply because there is no predetermined
format that they have to use. People can put as little or as much detail in this ad as they want to. It’s not easy to search through these ads. They’re not in any particular order, but I think it’s definitely
worth your time to go and look on this site to see
what there might be for you. This is a snapshot from Kijiji. Kijiji is spelled Kijiji.ca, for Canada. This is another source
of online advertisements that you can look through. Again, they’re not easily
searchable, so you have to really pay attention to the
location of the property in relation to which campus
you’re going to be at. It could be all across
the City of Hamilton, and we are a very large,
physically large city, so you could end up being
very far away from campus if you’re not careful to check on a map. The next slide is just an
example of what one of the ads might look like on Kijiji. Again, there’s not set format,
so people can just post whatever information
they feel is necessary. But I just wanted you to
see what it might look like. Another suggested
website is GottaRent.com. That’s GottaRent.com. Make sure you’re looking
under Hamilton, Ontario. This site is pretty much specifically for high
rise apartment buildings. You’re not gonna find
rooms in a student house on this board, so if you want
a place just for yourself or maybe there’s two of
you, you want a two bedroom apartment, this might
be a good place to look. So I suggest, before you actually
start looking for housing you should do a bit of preparation. First of all, think about who you might want to
live with, if anybody. Perhaps you’re traveling
here with another student from your local school or community and you want to live
together in the same house. It’s highly probable that
you’ll be able to find a house together, each of you with
your own private bedroom, but a shared kitchen,
bathroom and living space. Again, if you want just a
private space to yourself, a self-contained one bedroom apartment, you can find those options as well. If you are coming here all by yourself but you do hope to live with other people, we offer a service called
the Housemate Connector. You’ll find this on our
website, MacOffCampus.ca or, we sort of have two websites
on the go right now. The other one is HCS.McMaster.ca. If you go to that link,
you can register yourself, fill out a profile and once
your profile’s approved, you can then go into the system and look at other people’s profiles. If you see someone that
you’re interested in that you think has that
same interests as yourself or maybe is in the same program,
you can reach out to them via the email that’s available
and introduce yourself and sort of take it from
there, and hopefully you make sort of a connection,
and maybe you decide that, yeah, let’s be housemates together, and then you can go back
to the regular listings and look for a place that
you can live together for the next couple of months. This slide just shows you
a bit about the profile that you will fill out. It’s similar to applying
to Residence, really. It will ask you details about
what times you go to bed, what time do you get up? Do you like to have a
quiet space when you study or do you like to socialize? Those kind of things, just
to give people an idea of what your lifestyle
is like, and hopefully you can find someone with a
similar lifestyle to yourself. Also, before you start your
housing search, I suggest you give some thought to the
type of housing that you want. There are lots of different
options available here in Hamilton, and I’m gonna explain them on the next few slides. Probably the most common
type of housing that we have here in Hamilton is what
we refer to as a bedroom in a student house, and
these are just snapshots of some typical rooms or a typical house, what you might see
walking down the street. So, these homes were built
as traditional family homes, but as families moved out,
landlords bought the properties and have decided to rent them to students. Therefore, what used to be
a traditional three bedroom home might now be a home with
five or six bedrooms or more. They often build rooms in the
basement, which tend to be cooler here because they’re
below ground and we do have winter, or they sometimes
will make the living room or an attic a bedroom,
and the attic tends to be much warmer than the rest of the house. There are some things to think
about when you’re considering the type of room or the location
of the room in the house. They do this in order to fit
more tenants into the house and to make for money from the rent. So, as far as a bedroom
in a student house, it means that you will have
your own private bedroom, but you will be sharing the
space with other students, and this is usually the most affordable type of accommodation
that you’re gonna find, so if money is a concern, you probably want to look at a bedroom
in a student house. Again, you have your own private bedroom, which may or may not be furnished. You will have to carefully read the details of the ad about that. But then you will share the
kitchen and the bathroom with the other students
living in the house. Most of these houses have
anywhere from five to ten bedrooms in them, but you could
be sharing common space with several other people. In these situations,
you will likely be asked to sign a 12 month or
an eight month lease. A special note about housing in Canada. We do have basements here in
Hamilton and there are often bedrooms located in the
basement, as I mentioned. These spaces, however, are
usually nicely finished with proper walls, lighting and windows. They are generally not
awful, to be honest, but some people will not
be comfortable in them. I suggest that you at
least consider this space if you hear of a basement bedroom. You can often get those spaces
for cheaper rent, and again, you might be surprised at
how nice a basement can look. Student high rise apartments. We do have several high rise
buildings close to campus, and then there are a lot more
even in downtown Hamilton, but if you don’t want to
live with that many people, you might consider renting a
two or three bedroom apartment, which might be more comfortable for you. Again, you’d have your
own private bedroom, but share the bathroom and
kitchen with the others. These high rise apartments
are almost always unfurnished, so you will have to buy a
bed, desk, dining table, kitchen wares such as cutlery and dishes, but a refrigerator and a stove
will be provided for you. You can also find just
a one bedroom apartment or a bachelor or a studio
apartment, which means there’s no distinct bedroom, it’s
just one big living space open to the kitchen. You’ll have a private
bathroom for your use. These apartments will almost
always insist that you sign a 12 month lease, which could
be a concern for some of you if you’re only going to be
here for four or eight months. I do not recommend that
you sign such a long lease unless you have no other option. If you do end up signing 12
month leases, you can then probably try to sublet to
someone else when you leave. If you definitely want or need
a furnished unit to live in, there are some apartments in the area that are designed
specifically for students and are furnished with bed,
desk and kitchen access. You’ll find these
advertised on our website under student high rise apartments. Because these units are fully
equipped and are usually a very new building, they
are much more expensive than a room in a student house,
but if you can afford it, these would make for a really
easy option for you to rent. One drawback is that most
of them will also ask you to sign a 12 month lease or
longer, but they generally have a long list of
people waiting to move in, so they can probably help
you find a replacement if you do leave earlier than the lease. They often run a roommate
matching service as well, so that you can apply as a single person, and they will match you with
someone else in the building who’s looking for a
roommate, which can save you a lot of time and frustration. If you’re coming for just
one semester or even longer, but particularly for just one
semester, you might look into what we refer to as a
room in a landlord’s home. These types of rooms are in a family home, wherein you would have a private bedroom, but share the kitchen and
the bathroom with the owner and their family if they
have children or a spouse. Sometimes they just live on
their own, and they have extra bedrooms that they then rent
out to people like yourselves. The owner is usually quite happy to be living with an
international student, sharing in a learning experience with you. The all-inclusive rent price
is generally affordable, meaning the utility costs
are included in your rent. You don’t need to budget any extra money. Usually it’s just one flat fee. It includes furnishings, sheets, towels and some of the basic kitchen housewares. Because you would be dealing
directly with the homeowner and it is their private
space, they’re usually willing to be more flexible in the
length of the lease, so this is why it is a very good
option for a short-term stay. Next question to ask is
how much can you afford? Of course, you will always need
to think about your budget. How much can you afford to pay in rent, plus the cost of utilities
and the cost of buying food, travel plans that you might wanna do while you’re here, et cetera. Depending on your budget,
it will make a difference as to which type of housing
you can realistically consider. Some examples of rent costs. These are just some average
estimates for you to use while you’re budgeting, but remember
that these prices are in Canadian dollars and you’ll find that, you’re gonna see places
that are cheaper than these and some that are more expensive, but again, this is just a good
medium range to budget with. For instance, a room in a student house, I would suggest you should
expect to pay about $550 a month, plus the cost of utilities,
with no furnishings. Utilities altogether might
cost you another 60 or $70 per month, plus your share
of internet, probably. A one bedroom apartment
in one of the, oh sorry, a one bedroom in a two bedroom shared Private Student Residence will
cost you in the neighborhood of $1,000 plus electricity,
whereas if you were to get a one bedroom apartment to yourself in a private apartment
building, you would probably be spending closer to
1,000 or $1,500 a month. And room in a landlord’s
home is gonna cost you somewhere in the neighborhood
of probably $700 a month. And again, it includes
furnishings and utilities. Finally, you need to think
about where you want to live. The main McMaster campus is in
the western end of Hamilton, but we also have a medical campus and our Centre for Continued
Education in downtown Hamilton. Our MBA school is in
the city of Burlington. All of these will make difference as to which part of Hamilton
you want to live in, so be careful when choosing your location. On our website we have
organized our listings according to zones. This is unique to our
website, MacOffCampus.ca. You won’t see it on any other listings. McMaster Children’s Hospital
and McMaster Innovation Park are also found in zone one,
along with the main campus. This is a nice, safe part of Hamilton, easily accessible by bus
and has all the amenities that you need for living,
including grocery stores, pharmacies, restaurants, coffee shops. Zones two and three are downtown Hamilton, and these zones include the McMaster David Braley
Health Sciences Centre and the McMaster Centre
for Continued Education. There are some other
hospitals downtown as well. You’ll also find a mall
centrally located called Jackson Square Mall, which has many stores for your convenience,
including a great multicultural grocery store called Nations Fresh Food. Zones two and three are easily
accessible by direct city bus to the main campus, which
takes about 20 to 25 minutes to reach us by bus from downtown. With this in mind, if you an undergraduate or graduate student,
but not an MBA student, you will have access to a bus pass. It is included in your student
fees, and so it will not cost you anything extra to ride the bus to get around the City of Hamilton. This means that you might
choose to live a little bit further way from campus,
which could save you some money in rent costs. The McMaster University main campus is a very popular destination for riders. There are many buses
coming into the campus on a regular basis every day of the week, late into the evening. The name of our city bus
system is commonly referred to as the HSR, which stands
for Hamilton Street Railway. We’ve given you the website
there so you can do some further exploration on the different
schedules and the fares, well not fares, because
your fees are included, but the different schedules
and routes, et cetera. As you’ll see, this is a
close-up of that website, and they do offer a trip
planning feature within the City of Hamilton, so if
you wanna know how to get from, let’s say the McMaster main
campus to Lime Ridge Mall, which is on the opposite end of the city, you can punch in those two
different destination points and they’ll show you and
tell you which buses to take and where to transfer
and all that information. I know that, as an international student, you’re probably worried
about finding a place and ideally, you would
like to secure something before you arrive in Hamilton. However, this can sometimes be a problem. For instance, if you
choose a place to live over the internet, you may
end up choosing a place that is too far from the campus or you might rent a room
that is not very nice or doesn’t feel safe,
which is not something, of course, you are hoping for. If possible, I suggest that you reserve a hotel room in advance. So for the first couple of days
when you arrive in Hamilton, and then you can use that time to go out and look at rental properties
for yourself to be sure that you’re getting the
right place that suits you and for the right length of
time that you need it for. So, basic things I want you to
know about living in Ontario. There is a law in Ontario called the Residential Tenancies Act, and it dictates some
basic things and explains what landlords are responsible
for, as well as tenants. So, the landlord is gonna
expect you to pay your rent on time every month usually by
the first day of each month. The landlord is responsible
for keeping your place in a generally good state of repair. If something breaks or stops
working, it is their job to fix it or hire someone
to make the repair. If, however, you caused
the damage yourself either willfully or out of neglect, then you will have to pay
to have the repairs made. Even though the landlord
must provide you with sources for heat, electricity and water, they do not have to pay
for those utilities. They might include
these in your rental fee or they might make you pay for
them separately on your own. I just want to make note that the landlord is required to give you 24 hours notice before they enter your house or apartment. They cannot just use their own key and enter whenever they want. You have the right to
privacy under the law, so don’t let the landlord
take advantage of you. As for you as the tenant,
you do have some expectations of yourself as well and responsibilities. As mentioned, you are required by law to pay your rent on time and in full. If for some reason you
do not have the money available at the beginning of the month, speak with your landlord right away. They might be willing to wait
a few days, but it’s best to be honest and explain
why you will be delayed. If you are late paying your
rent, he can evict you. Keeping the home clean
is important to not just your landlord, but to
your housemates as well. You’ll be sharing common
spaces like the kitchen and bathroom, so it’s important
to clean up after yourself. Make sure not to leave food
and crumbs lying around, as this can attract
cockroaches, ants and mice, which is very unhealthy
for everyone involved. When putting your garbage
outside for pickup, it should be stored in
closed containers so that rats and raccoons do not get into it, making messes that you
will have to clean up. If you need something
repaired, it is best to put your request in writing, either
through email or an actual letter, and give that to your
landlord as soon as possible, asking them to make the repairs. If the landlord does not respond or refuses to make the
repair, you can contact the Ontario Landlord and
Tenant Board for assistance, but it’s important to
note that you should never withhold your rent as a way to try to get the landlord to make the repairs. If you do not pay your rent, again, the landlord can have you evicted. As mentioned, you need to
allow your landlord to enter if they have given you written
notice 24 hours in advance, and they’ve explained to
you why they need to enter, for instance to make their repairs or check smoke alarms, et cetera. I told you a little bit before about the Ontario Residential
Tenancies Act, and they oversee the relationship between
landlord and the tenant. In most situations, you are
going to be asked to sign a lease, and the Landlord
and Tenant Board is there so that if any of those
agreements within the lease get broken, you can turn
to them for some help. It’s important for you to know
that this is a legal document and should be taken seriously. Once you sign the lease, you
cannot easily get out of it, which is why it is so
important to see the place that you plan to rent and make sure that you’re comfortable with
it before you sign the lease. You should be sure that you
understand the requirements within the lease and agree to the terms that you’re expected to live by. Once you sign the lease, you’re
legally committed to paying the rent each month for
the duration of that lease. If you don’t pay your
rent on time or leave without getting your
landlord’s permission, a landlord can take you to court. If you do make arrangements
with the landlord to, um, sorry, if you do arrange for a place before you arrive in Hamilton
and you’re not happy with it when you get here, you should
speak with the landlord immediately and they might let you start looking for someone to replace you. However, you do have to keep
paying your rent in full until a replacement moves
in to take over for you. When you sign a lease, the landlord is going to ask you to pay a deposit. Legally, they’re only allowed to ask you to pay an amount equal
to one month’s rent. So, if you’re going to pay
$600 per month for rent, that is all that they
can ask you for to start. The rest of the rent will be paid to them at the beginning of each month. They are not allowed to ask you for a damage deposit, a cleaning deposit. They also cannot require you to pay for all of your rent in one lump sum. I strongly recommend
you do not pay with cash unless you get a receipt
immediately for that transaction. Otherwise, they might take
your cash and then lie and say that they didn’t
receive the money from you. Always try to pay by check
or e-transfer, if possible. Also, always ask to get
a receipt for the money you pay to the landlord,
because you will need that proof that you paid that rent when you file your income tax next year. If you change your mind
about renting the place after you have paid the deposit, the landlord is not necessarily obligated to return the deposit money to you. The landlord is allowed
to ask for a small amount for a key deposit, about
$50, in case you lose a key and they have to replace it. This key deposit must
be listed as refundable in your lease, so that
when you vacate your unit, they will have to return
any unused amounts to you. Make sure that you have
the landlord’s full name, their mailing address and a
phone number to contact them at. And if you’re a first year
undergraduate student, you might be very interested
in attending Welcome Week, which begins this year
on Saturday August 24th. Most leases, however, will
begin on Saturday September 1st. Don’t be afraid to ask
your landlord if you can move in early so that you
can attend Welcome Week. If the room is going to be
vacant, then you probably can move in early for a
little bit of an extra cost, just pay for that extra
week you stay there. All landlords should be asking you to sign the Ontario Standard Lease,
which is actually 14 pages long. This makes it a really
easy, clear, standard lease for both the landlord
and tenant to understand their rights and responsibilities. This is what the first page
of the lease looks like, so watch for this when
you’re signing leases. If the landlord does not
give you a lease that looks like this, you have the
right to ask them to do so, and if they still refuse,
you can withhold your first month’s rent until they
provide you with this version. So, paying your rent. This is often, or coming
up with that deposit is often a concern for many
international students. Landlords are allowed to
ask you for certain things. They can ask you for references
or to provide a credit check as proof that you’re a good tenant and can afford to pay your rent. However, obviously this can be
a challenge if you’re coming from another country,
so it’s very difficult. There’s no simple, easy answer
of how to get around this. These are some things that
I suggest that you try. First of all, open up a Canadian
bank account and deposit funds from your home bank
so that you can show them that you have funds
available to support you. You can ask the new bank to write a letter stating when you opened
the account, that funds are available in the account and
particularly if there are any dates that you expect to have
regular deposits coming in. If you’ve received a job offer
or you’re offered to attend McMaster, you might show
them a copy of that letter explaining that, validating
the fact that you are coming and you are going to be part
of the McMaster community. If you are going to be
receiving any financial awards or special funding from
McMaster, you might also print off a copy of the letter, again, showing that you’re going to
have this money coming in. They just want to be sure that
you’re able to pay your rent, and sometimes they can
be a bit more skeptical when you’re an international student. Not that that’s right,
but that is just a fact. Things that you need to watch out for. I have to warn you about these things. When you’re looking for
housing, as mentioned before, try not to pay cash. You cannot trace cash like
you can a check, so a landlord can easily lie and say
that you didn’t pay them. You should not have to pay all
of your rent in one lump sum. You should only have to
pay one month at a time. And if a landlord says
they are unable to show you the inside of the house or
the apartment for some reason, but they still expect you
to pay them a deposit, do not rent from them. You should always be able to
see the inside before renting. If you’re not comfortable
with that person or you don’t trust what they’re telling you,
just keep looking at places and you’ll find a much
better option, I’m sure. Some tips, things to think
about when you’re living here in Canada, ways to keep yourself safe. Always lock your doors and windows. We do live in a safe part of Hamilton. Generally, the Westdale
neighborhood that’s close to campus is generally very safe, but
it is a student neighborhood, and so sometimes thieves
will target the area, just knowing that students
typically don’t lock their doors and windows, so make sure that you are doing that and
keeping yourself safe. Do not plug too many things
into the electrical socket. Be careful if you’re
using an extension cord. You should not plug too much into it or this could cause a fire
if you overload things. And only use good quality extension cords. Do not use ones from the Dollar Store, they do tend to be more of a fire hazard. If you’re cooking with grease,
please stay with the pot. Grease fires are one of the top causes of house fires in Canada. You should stay with
it, keep an eye on it, make sure it’s not up too high and make sure it’s turned off and removed from the hot stove as soon
as you’re done with it. And clean the top of the stove regularly to avoid any grease buildup. When you arrive in Hamilton,
a few things to keep in mind when you go to move in to your place. Let the landlord know the
date and the expected time of your arrival so that they
can be there to meet you and give you the keys. While they’re there, take
a few minutes with them to walk through the house and
make note of existing damage so that you are not responsible for damage that was there before you arrived. You don’t want to be charged
for those extra repairs. Ask your landlord how to dispose
of garbage and recycling, because it’s different
in every city in Canada. You are to understand how your
mail delivery is going to, how it’s going to be accepted. Sometimes it will come to your house. Sometimes there might be a post office box that you need to go and retrieve mail. And you might just want
to double check with them about how the appliances work,
because it might be different from where you’re coming from. And unless you bring them
with you, you are going to have to buy your own bedding,
towels, pillows, et cetera. There are some stores near the
main campus where you can buy some of these basic items
when you get here, or you can plan a trip later to
Wal-Mart or some other stores that are a little bit further
away to buy those supplies. That’s it for me. I’m sure you’ve probably
got some more questions that I didn’t respond to,
but I’m also leaving you here with the contact
information for our office. You can send us an email or
you can go on to our website. Again, we’re sorta using two
different websites right now, but there’s a lot of information
on both of those sites that might answer some of
your questions as well. But I think we’re going to actually respond to some questions. – Thanks Jen. So we have been answering
some questions via text or just by responding to them,
so I have saved some for, to do live, so this one’s for you, Jerry. So for the December break,
would you know how much that would cost for students to stay for the December break if they wish to? – Um, so the fee for the
December break is $385. – Perfect. Uh, another question for you. What is the date that
students will find out if they have secured on-campus housing? – So, following June 3rd, we’ll
be sending out information regarding whether or not,
that particular information. – Okay, perfect, so that
also is the same for if students want to know deadlines
for paying the total cost of meal plans and stuff
like that, they would get information after June 3rd, correct? – They will get that information in an email following that deadline. – Perfect. I also have a student asking if you can give some
information on the meal plans. – I mean, is there a
specific, anything specific? – I know one student asked
if there are places to eat on campus that don’t require a meal plan, but from my understanding,
if you’re on campus, there is at least the minimum,
a meal plan is required for all students who are on-campus. Is that correct? – Yes, for all Residence
students, a meal plan is required, but also, if you do not have a
meal plan as another student, I believe what the question
was, all the eateries do also accept cash, debit and credit. – Perfect. But just to clarify, students
who are staying in Residence, a meal plan is required. – Yes, a meal plan is
required by hospitality for students staying in Residence. – Perfect, and also with that meal plan, there are options for students to dine both on-campus and some
off-campus, correct? – Yes, there are several
off-campus options that do accept our meal plans. – Great. Can you give a little bit
of information on when is the check out date for
on-campus accommodations? So when will students have to move out? – So students are expected to move out the day following their last exam. – Okay, great. And is that for, would they
have to move out in December, or they’re able to leave
their things there in December and then they just actually
have to move out in April? – So in December, you can leave
everything of yours in Res, that’s not an issue, but
following your last exam in the spring, that’s
when you would move out. – Thank you. Another one for you. You seem like a popular guy today. So if a student decides that
they do not want to share a room, would they just
select, like on the application is there a selection where they can just check a private room
or how would that work? – So unfortunately, they are only preferences
on the application. We can’t guarantee that you will receive a single room or not. – Okay, great. Some of the room types
say that they are limited. What is the risk of not getting a room if I only choose limited
room types and not doubles? – So it will just depend on
demand and we’ll have to see once the June 3rd deadline hits. – Okay. Also, I know that if students
are applying for Residence and they have a friend who’s
also applying for Residence, there’s usually, they can identify that so that they can hopefully be paired. So I have a student who says
that they have guaranteed, I’m guessing the student had
a friend, are both guaranteed Residence, and in their
application they’re trying to identify themselves
as possible roommates, but it says no match is found. Do you know how they would
take care of that problem? Is there a glitch or? – I believe that may be a glitch. There is an option to message Residence Application
Admissions if there is an issue. But otherwise, they would go
to the roommate request form and use their student ID that
they received in their offer. – Great. And also, for costs of the meal plan, would you just direct
them to your website? – Sure, so the meal plan website is just Hospitality.McMaster.ca/meal_plan. – Great, thank you. I also have a student asking
if a single user washroom with double room, how
many students share that? – Typically, they’ll be an alcove of maybe two to four rooms. – Okay. Is there a cafeteria/dining room in every Residence building? Is there a kitchen on every floor? – So there is not a
cafeteria in every building. Most buildings do have
either eating options within the building of
in adjacent buildings. And for all the traditional-style
dorm rooms, there will be a shared kitchen in their
common space for each floor. – Great. So there is a student who has a conditional offer to McMaster. If they do go ahead and actually
ask to stay in Residence and they pay the $600, if at
the end of that their offer is rescinded or they choose not to come or whatever happens to their offer, are they able to get that
money back, or what happens? – So in that particular case, they would have to contact Res Admissions. That’s rather specific. – Okay, great. Are there any additional
costs involved from moving on-campus accommodation early
for international students? Is that an option and is
there an extra fee for that? – Yeah, so we will be announcing
the date later this summer, but international students will be able to request an earlier move in date. – And also I’m just gonna
quickly add to that. For first year students who
are staying in Residence, undergrad students, we
do have an Ignite program that is happening
specifically for students who will be staying on-campus. There will be more
information sent out shortly, so if you are staying in
Residence and you want to participate in this program,
we are actually holding that move in date for those students
as August 19th and 20th. But as I mentioned, there
will be more information on the pre-departure webinar and also some more information
coming out via email. Okay, sorry, let me just take a look. I think we’re gonna move on to Jen. So Jen, there’s a student
who says, I’m looking for off-campus residence for a small family. I found some off-campus options
available at your website and my question is do you
recommend applying for rent before arriving to Hamilton or
should I look for a temporary rent, then look for a longer
one once I’m in Hamilton? What type of temporary rooms
or rents are available for me and how should I apply for them? – That one’s a little more
difficult because they indicated they’re coming with a family,
and I assume they mean small, young children, so
they probably are looking, I’m gonna guess, maybe for
a two bedroom apartment or something along those lines. You might be better to
sort of get on top of that as soon as possible to make
sure you’re getting something large enough for your family. If they have a spot
that they’re looking at, they could definitely send me an email at [email protected] and let me know the address of the property,
who their contact is, some of those details, and I
can let them know if I know of that property or just can give
them any details and I can sorta let them know if I
feel comfortable with them committing to it before they arrive. – Great, thank you. There are also many students
asking for students that are, of course, coming from abroad,
who might not be able to view the property, do you think just looking at photos would be okay? What would you suggest? Some are asking if they
come, would you suggest them coming in earlier and then
looking for somewhere to live once they arrive and
then signing the lease or what would you recommend? – Generally speaking, I
do recommend that you plan to arrive in Hamilton
a few days in advance and then use that time
to go out and see places. I really do believe it’s
important to see the place before you sign it whenever possible. I know it’s not always
possible, but just to guarantee that you’re getting
what you are happy with. I’ve had situations over
the years where students have signed their leases
and made the agreements before they got here and they arrived and the place was horrible
or, like I said before, it was in a basement or just
something that they weren’t happy with, and then they
tried to get out of the lease, but they’d already signed,
they’d already started making their payments, like,
the commitment was made, and it was really unfortunate for them and they were unhappy, so I’d
like to see that situation be avoided whenever
possible, and the best way to do that is to plan to stay in a hotel or some place like that here
for the first couple of days. But you need to reserve those
hotels before you arrive, ’cause it could be a very
busy time of the year so you wanna make sure you
have a solidified place to stay for the first couple of days. – Um, I have some MBA students asking. So MBA students will, most
of their classes are at, in Burlington, at the campus there. So just so MBA students know,
there is a bus that leaves from campus, from main
campus, every morning. It’s a big white bus that
will take you to the campus in Burlington and it goes
back and forth all day. There obviously are times
that it goes and there’s the last bus as well, so
students are asking about where to live, so because
there is that bus, I mean, they’re not just
limited to Burlington. They are also able to get
somewhere close to campus. Jen, do you have anything to add to that? – Yeah, from my experience and
I’ve worked here a long time, it is actually probably best for students to live in Hamilton. We do take some advertisements
from Burlington, but the location of the Ron
Joyce Centre in Burlington is rather isolated, so it’s
kind of difficult to get to, even if you live in Burlington. If you don’t have a
car, it’s kind of tough to get to that centre. And the rents tend to be quite a bit more expensive in Burlington. It’s only about a 20 minute
drive from the main campus, so it doesn’t take long to get there, and so I have learned that most students end up staying here in Hamilton,
close to the main campus, and then they take the
shuttle bus back and forth that you mentioned, Ana,
and I think they found that that is really the best option. – So many students have been asking, and I have been answering just by typing. When is the best time to
start looking for housing? I always say sooner rather
than later, but Jen, if you want to add to that? – Well again, as I’ve said many times, I do believe it’s best to wait
to wait ’til you get here. However, if you are gonna
get started, I recommend waiting probably until the end
of June, beginning of July. We do have some ads on
our website right now, but those landlords are
typically looking to fill those properties right now. They don’t necessarily
want to talk to you about an occupancy in September. They are still trying to
get their places filled as soon as possible, so once we hit July, if the place is still
vacant, then typically the landlord is more
willing to start negotiating and talking about a September occupancy. – Lots of students. Sorry, sorry. (laughs)
– That’s okay. – Students are also asking,
if they do come in earlier, as you’re suggesting,
how fast is the process of, let’s say they find a
place, they contact the landlord and they’re ready to sign the lease, how long in that process? Is it gonna take a week? Is it gonna take a few days? Basically, how long until they actually get into the house, basically? – Usually, in most
situations it’s just a matter of a couple of days. It shouldn’t take very long at all. If the place is vacant,
they’ll let you move in the same day sometimes. – Okay. So I think I’m gonna
bounce back to on-campus. So Jerry, is there a
place, or, do students, when they’re doing the
application, are they able to choose which Residence
they want to live in or is it kind of like a
lottery, or how does that work? – So at the moment, it’s preferences, and based on the demand and
based on how many applicants there are, it is based on a lottery. – Okay, and if students
want more information on the different types of Residences, would they get that on
the Residence website? – Sure, on Housing.McMaster.ca,
there are several pages. If you’re looking for information
about specific buildings or room types, we do have
pages for that as well. – So just to keep with that
topic, someone’s asking how, how can they ensure that they get their preferred housing style? Is it guaranteed or? – No, so the room types
and all preferences are all just preferences. We can’t guarantee that you will receive the room type that you do prefer. – Okay, and again,
students living on-campus, they are able to cook their
own food in the kitchens that are provided, correct? – Yes, there are common spaces with kitchens that are shared. – Okay. Is there a studying room for
each floor in the Residences? – Um, so typically, students
can use the common areas for studying, but there
are, some Residences do have study rooms within the
Res and there are also study rooms in adjacent buildings. – Okay, back to you Jen. (laughs) Are there any areas in
Hamilton that you would suggest avoiding for safety reasons or whatnot when looking for off-campus housing? – So that’s a good question,
and it’s a common question. Personally, the area that
surrounds the campus, that’s within walking distance, again, we refer to it as zone one. It’s the Westdale Ainslie Wood area. That’s the best place to
be as far as convenience, as well as safety, goes. Very nice neighborhood. Downtown Hamilton isn’t that bad, but just depends on what
you’re comfortable with. If you’re coming from a very large city, then you might be very
comfortable with it. If you’re coming from a small town, you might not be that comfortable. There are some homeless people, there are some empty storefronts
and things like that. It depends, again, on the area,
so zone two and zone three are downtown Hamilton and
you can find some good, sometimes more affordable
options being downtown, but it depends on what
you are comfortable with. And then there are other
parts of Hamilton as well. There’s something on our website
we refer to as zone four, which is on the western
side of the campus. A little bit beyond the campus, but it’s only like a 10, 15
minute bus ride from the campus. That is also the little
community or town of Dundas, and Dundas is a very nice
family-oriented kind of place, and they might be very comfortable
living in Dundas as well. – Great. – Sorry, I should just say there are other parts of Hamilton. You can, there’s lots,
again, it’s a big city, so there are lots of different areas, and it really just depends
on your comfort level. – Okay, so we have a few more questions and then we’re gonna wrap it up. So some people are asking, and we did speak about families before. So, for instance, if there
is someone who is bringing in a fiance or a spouse or
whatever to go look at a house, I would suggest disclosing
that to the landlord, because then there might be
consequences if the landlord thinks that they’re renting to one person and then there’s gonna be more coming in. Jen, did you wanna address that? – Yeah, generally speaking the
landlord can not discriminate against people if they
have a spouse or a partner, and if they want to have two
people living in one bedroom apartment, there should
be technically nothing to stop them from doing that. However, in practice, sometimes a landlord might have a different
attitude about that. And if you want to challenge
them on that you can, but if you just want to make things go as smooth as possible,
I agree with Ana. Identify that up front that
there will be two of you sharing the same bedroom
and yeah, that would just probably save you some
headache down the road. – Great. So, going back to your safety points. I’ve been asked if it is safer
to live on or off-campus. So, in my opinion, I don’t know
if there’s a safety feature. I think it’s more of a
convenience of living on and off-campus, but
if both of you want to kind of add to that, that would be great. – Yeah, um, yeah again, I
don’t know if there’d be. It is, I think you’re right. It’s a matter of convenience, mostly, especially if you’re in the
zone one area closest to campus, which again is a safe area. But if you are uncomfortable. Let’s say you’re here late
at night, for whatever reason you’re on-campus and it’s dark
and you’re feeling a little bit uneasy about walking
home or taking the bus back to your house, there is a
program available to students. It’s called SWAT, it’s the
Student Walk Home Attendant Team. It’s a free service, and
you can give them a call. Two people will come and
meet you wherever you are on campus, and they will
walk you back to your house. Again, so it’s a nice
safety feature and again, it might just be really nice
for the first couple of weeks until you get used to Hamilton. Or if you want to use it all
year long, that’s fine too, but that’s just something
else to keep in mind if you’re feeling uncomfortable. – Um, okay, so Jerry, I think
I have one more for you. How does the lottery system work? Normally, how many percentage
of us would get in eventually or maybe get our choices? – Um, so at the moment I don’t
have any concrete information pertaining to that, but they
will be receiving information following the June 3rd deadline. – Okay. Uh, okay, we’re gonna end with this one. So this one’s for Jen again. I guess some student has
been doing some searching on off-campus accommodations
and they mentioned AirBnb rather than a long-term stay. So for instance, many ads
are offering a furnished room in zone two and three from anywhere from 600 to $1,000 a month. Are these ads to be
considered as suspicious or is this kind of a normal thing? – If I understand the question correctly, this is strictly on AirBnb? And I think you’re asking me
is that a reasonable rent? – I think so, I think for the price, yes. – So I would say, without
seeing the place, yes. 600 to $1,000 a month is
probably, yeah, probably expected, probably reasonable. As far as the legitmacy
goes, I don’t know. I’d have to. You always do your homework. Double check that landlord or whomever it is, the
contact, is legitimate. Google the name. See if the name comes up
on many different websites, then that might be something
to be cautious about. – Great, well I wanna thank
everyone for joining us today, and just watch out for
our upcoming webinars, where you can get more information. I know you must be having
questions on immigration and study permits and
when to come to campus and what does Hamilton have to offer and McMaster, et cetera, et cetera. So we have some upcoming webinars that will answer all of
those questions for you. There’s some great
information coming in as well. So we hope to see you all in September. Thank you for joining us. Thank you Jen, thank you Jerry. Thank you to the team who’s working behind answering all those
questions for you guys. And we hope to see you soon.
Thank you!