International Students & Income Tax: How to file a Canadian tax return

International Students & Income Tax: How to file a Canadian tax return

August 30, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Welcome to the segment called How to file a Canadian income tax and benefit return, part of the International
Students and Income Tax video. This segment mentions links where you can get
more information. You can find all these links in the Related links
for this segment. With me is Nicole Bélanger. Welcome, Nicole. Thanks Sarah. When do I need to file or send my income tax and
benefit return? A tax year, like a calendar
year, ends on December 31st. You have until April 30th of
the following year to file your income tax and benefit return
and pay any taxes you owe. There is one exception. If you or your spouse or
common-law partner are self-employed, your return must
be filed on or before June 15th. Keep in mind that if
you owe any taxes, you still have to pay any
amount due by April 30th. If you don’t file on time, or
don’t pay your taxes owing on time, you could be charged
penalties and interest. Some international students may
have been in Canada for a few years but are just now learning
that it may be beneficial for them to file a return. Can they still file their
previous year’s returns? Generally, an individual has
three years from the end of the tax year to file a return
and to claim a refund. However, there are some
exceptional situations that may allow you to file after
the three-year deadline. For more information, see the
CRA’s income tax information circular IC07-1, Taxpayer
Relief Provisions. Let’s say I have to file
several years of tax returns, and have to pay tax. Is there a way to reduce
the penalties and interest? You might qualify for the CRA’s
Voluntary Disclosures Program. For more information
about the program, go to www.cra.gc.ca/
voluntarydisclosures. As an international student,
which income tax and benefit package should I use? That depends on your
residency status and the income that
you are reporting. We discuss the different
residency statuses in the segment of
this video called Residency and why
it’s important. As an international student,
you will either use the general income tax and benefit package
for the province or territory where you lived
on December 31st, or the income tax and benefit
package for non-residents and deemed residents of Canada. Let’s say I’m an international
student who was a resident of Canada for tax purposes
for the whole year. Which tax package should I use? If you were a resident of
Canada for a full year, use the general income tax and
benefit package for the province or territory where you
lived on December 31st. If you were a resident of
Quebec on December 31st, you have to file a federal
return with the CRA and a separate return
with Revenu Québec. For information about
filing in Quebec, visit www.revenuquebec.ca. What types of options do I
have for filing my return as a resident of Canada
for tax purposes? If you’d like to prepare
your return yourself, you can file your return online
using one of several tax preparation software packages
available for a fee or, in some cases, free of charge. You can find a list of
NETFILE certified software at www.netfile.gc.ca/software. You can also file a paper copy
of your return by mailing it to your local tax centre. You can download and print a
copy of the tax package from the CRA website or, if you are
using the general package, you can pick up a copy at any
Canada Post location from February until May. You can also have a tax
professional help you prepare and file your return online. Whether you prepare your return
yourself or have it prepared by a tax professional, remember
that filing online means that you get your refund faster. The CRA webpage called
Sending a tax return lists all of the filing options
available to you. Let’s say I am an international
student who recently arrived in Canada and became a resident
of Canada during the year. Which tax package would I use? As a newcomer to Canada, you
use the general income tax and benefit package for the
province or territory where you lived on
December 31st. Have a look at pamphlet T4055,
Newcomers to Canada for other filing options available to you. What if I am an
international student who is a deemed
resident of Canada? Use the income tax and benefit
package for non-residents and deemed residents of Canada. You’ll find a complete list
of filing options for deemed residents in CRA Guide 5013-G,
General Income Tax and Benefit Guide for Non-Residents and
Deemed Residents of Canada. See the heading called
How to file your return, which is in the
Refund or Balance owing section of the guide. Let’s say I’m an international
student who is a non-resident of Canada for tax purposes. Which tax package do I use? If you are a
non-resident of Canada, the type of income
you earn affects which return you need to file. Generally, you use the income
tax and benefit package for non-residents and deemed
residents of Canada. However, if you are only
reporting income from employment in Canada, use the general
income tax and benefit package for the province or territory
where you earned the income. You’ll also have to
include a schedule D. It’s also good to know that if
you’re considered a non-resident for income tax and benefit
purposes and don’t have any taxable Canadian income, you
can’t file a return for the sole purpose of carrying forward
the tuition, education, and textbook amounts. The CRA webpage called
Exceptions lists all the situations where a non-resident
might file a different return. What filing options are
available for non-residents? All the filing options can be
found in Guide 5013-G under the heading How to file your return. Returns filed by non-residents
are processed by the International Tax
Services Office. What is the contact information
for the International Tax Services Office? The address and
telephone numbers are on the CRA’s website. Thank you, Nicole. This concludes the segment
called How to file a Canadian income tax and benefit return,
part of the CRA’s International Students and Income Tax video. Thank you for watching.