International Student Panel

International Student Panel

August 22, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


– Good morning, good afternoon, good evening, depending on where you’re tuning in from. I’m Bruce DelMonico, assistant dean for admissions here at the Yale School of Management. Thank you for taking part in this international student panel. We have about an hour. It’s 9:00 AM US eastern time right now. We’ll go to maybe a little before 10:00 o’clock eastern time as the students here have class soon after 10:00 so we make sure they can get there easily without rushing. But in the meantime, the idea for today is to give you all access to our students, students who come from outside the US, and they’re studying here at Yale, to get their insights and their thoughts on their experience, and be able to have you ask questions directly to them to get the greatest insights about what life is like at Yale and studying here in the States. Before we get going I’d love it if the students could each just introduce themselves briefly. Your name, your year, maybe what you were doing before. And so, what your internship, and if you know what you’re doing afterwards. Deolu, do you want to start?
– I’ll start. Hi guys, my name is Adeoluwa Omotola. I’m from Nigeria. I’m in the second year of the MBA program. Back in Nigeria I was in the asset management industry. I spent the better of a decade working in equity research and portfolio management for one of the largest asset management companies in Nigeria. I was fortunate enough to get an internship in the same field. I was in Santa Fe, New Mexico, working with Thornburg investment management. It’s a $50 billion hard mutual funds shop and it’s about 50/50 between equities and fixed income. It was a good experience, and I’m glad to be able to be here to share some of my time. Basically the internship was generally at SOM with you guys. – Hi everyone. I’m Ashish Rathi, also second year. Prior to SOM I was working in big data analytics consulting. During my internship I was in a fintech firm in SF. And post-Yale I’ll be joining Amazon in the AWS Cloud team. – Hi, I’m Luis Mas. I’m from Lima, Peru. Before coming to SOM I was working at the UN international led organization for about four years. Came here to do a career pivot and for the summer went to Twitter doing data analytics and strategy. And I’m probably going back to the Bay Area after graduation. – Hi, everyone. My name is Shurui Chen. I grew up in Xiamen, China, and I came to the states for college. After that, I stayed in Houston, Texas, working as a human capital consultant for two years before coming to SOM. And I want to stay in consulting, so for my summer I worked for Bain & Company, the consulting firm in Houston. After graduation I will be returning to Bain in their New York office. – Hi, everyone. My name is Daniel Klein, born and raised in Israel. Prior to SOM I spent three years in the military, after which I started a small marketing company that I grew. Over the summer I interned at a big real estate firm and hoping to transition into real estate. That’s what I’m going to continue in. – Great. Thank you all, thank you for participating. So you can see we tried to cover as much of the globe as possible. I think we did pretty well with that. Obviously it’s, for those of you who are thinking about getting your MBA, especially studying in the States, it’s an important consideration, it’s a big life change. So, whatever questions you have, we’re happy to take them and try to have as candid a conversation as possible. In the meantime, I do have a few questions just to get things going and start very broadly. And you don’t all have to answer every question, but for the first one, if a few of you can chime in about just why did you want to get an MBA generally, and what were you hoping to get out of the degree. – I’ll start us off again. I think for me the MBA was an opportunity to get a different, I guess, perspective about management of people other than what I already had. So I, as I mentioned, worked in the finance industry, and I think for most of us in that space, the CFA is the holy grail, really. So I will obtain my CFA a few years back. I wasn’t particularly keen on the MBA. But I have a couple of friends from the same office back in Nigeria who had gone to different business schools around the globe and who told me a lot about sort of the diverse experience they had, the changing perspective that occurred as part of the experience that they had in the MBA. I thought, you know, if we live in a world in which you never know everything, it’s actually a good idea to maybe have this to sort all the things out I wanted to do. So that’s how I got interested in the MBA. – I can go next. So for me, it’s kind of two-fold. Career-wise, for consultants, a lot of them get an MBA kind of between associate level and consulting level just to get that education and broaden their network to kind of move up the career ladder. And personally, since I was working in human capital consulting before, I think focusing on human capital, of course, is an important part of the organization but it’s only one single lens. So I think MBA will give me the holistic view of what it takes to operate a business, what it takes to run a company. And that will really help me to help my clients excel. So, that was kind of, career-wise and personal-wise, I wanted to get an MBA to help me move up the career ladder there. – Maybe one other thought from one of the other panelists? Daniel, sure. – So, I came from a relatively non-traditional background with military and marketing entrepreneur. And the MBA is a way to make a horizontal transition into a completely new field that is dominated by investment bankers. And the tools, and the network, and the school, gives you the ability to transition into something completely new from scratch. – That’s great, thank you. As a followup question, obviously, there are different options for getting an MBA. Studying in the States is probably one of the most common but that’s not the only option. I want to get a sense of why you all thought that studying here in the US would be the best course for you. And I think, Shurui, I think you were in the States beforehand so that made more sense. I don’t know if any of the others… I think you’re all coming from outside the US, right? That’s a big transition, a big life change, so why move to the States to study for you MBA? – Sure, so I can go. So for me, as I mentioned, I was working in a big data analytics firm previously. And I really wanted to make a transition to the tech sector working in like a big tech firm, getting that experience. And, like, US in itself, and the Silicon Valley in itself, is kind of the main place to be in if you want to work in the tech sector. So I think one in itself as opposed to MBA career that I wanted to be made it as strong, made US like a strong choice for me in itself. And secondly, just the kind of B schools that US has, and the kind of diverse experiences that you can get at any B school in the US made it like a very strong choice for me. – I’ll go next. I think similar to Ashish, I was trying to look how to get into Silicon Valley, to the Bay Area, get into tech. And it was kind of like the right way to go first to the US. It’s easier to network, it’s easier to go to the office, it’s easier to know more about the industry and get the certain skills to go into that new area. And the second thing is diversity, and especially the mission from SOM was something that really rang a bell for me. It was like the right call I think. – And I guess sort of picking up on that, since you mentioned the mission, and sort of, the reason for Yale in particular. Are there things that attracted you all to Yale specifically as the place to get your MBA? – I can follow up. – Sure, if you want to keep going. – I think the idea of taking classes outside of the School of Management and getting exposure to the whole university was great. Studying political science as an undergrad. You know, and Ian Shapiro that teaches one of the classes here, one of the core classes for the political science background, and knowing Susan Stokes which is also here. It was amazing to get the opportunity to share the university space with them and get a chance to grab coffee to them. Most of them are really approachable so that was something that was like, okay, I got the opportunity to get the business skills but at the same time I can leverage the whole university for building the kind of path in the MBA I want. – I could add to that. I think, for me, it was mostly about people. I talked about friends that I had spoken to before deciding to pursue the MBA. A couple of them were from Yale and it definitely just testified to very good experiences. I think the other part of it for me was I had the impression distinctly that Yale was interested in really knowing me as a person. What I did for my application was I had, I think, one or two of my bosses in the office, two references for different schools I applied to. And they really came back and were like, the application process and the reference process for Yale was completely different. It seemed like there were elements of that that they had to provide that showed that there was a genuine interest in trying to figure out who is this individual and how best can we help them. That was a very big factor in my ultimate decision. – I think those are great points. And I will add onto that is kind of the global network and the global branding for me is really important. Coming from China, and potentially thinking about going to China in the long term, I think having that on my resume, and also the network, especially in Asia, will be really helpful for my career if I do make the move moving back to Asia. And kind of studying here also made me feel how impactful the network is. The GNAM network, the global network of the best management really helped me kind of know people from all around the world, in other business schools too. And we had a case competition just with 14 schools coming to the US together. And that itself was a great way for me to expand my network, just outside of the US as well. – So I have a few more questions that I was planning to ask in advance, but we’re already getting lots of questions from the attendees, and not surprisingly, some of them are about admissions, but some of them are about careers, which makes sense because that’s why you get an MBA, is to advance to career. At least that’s one reason. And a number of you, Ashish and Luis, you talked about wanting to come to the States to get access to Silicon Valley, get access to jobs inside the US. Shurui, it sounds like you’re talking about maybe going to China, at some point, to work in the future? I’d love to get a sense… And so the questions I’ve received are both about the availability and opportunity to work in the US, especially visas, and then also the availability of jobs outside the US. So kind of both. So I’d love to get a sense, maybe, of you all, what your plans are, and how that’s shaping up right now, in terms of your post-MBA professional careers. – I can start. So, I had a very good time at Thornburg, but I won’t be going back there, so I’m currently just in the process for a full time search. I think the job search process in the US is very different from, I don’t know, wherever you’re probably coming from. It’s intense in a different kind of way. What I’m trying to do right now is basically just be systematic. I have basically the names that I know that I’m interested in. Some in asset management. There’s guys who are naturally going to be able to top our values, to the tier of prices, the Fidelities, and what I’m really just doing is focusing on those guys as the first tier of the search and then just taking it from there. I think it’s been very useful to find, as Shurui talked about, find people who wouldn’t know you from anywhere but just because you’re part of the Yale family give you referrals to other people who are then in a position to help you. So, it’s been a pretty, I guess, intense experience, just in terms of the search. But certainly looking good right now. – Yeah, that’s great. – Similar experiences. I would say, the recruitment process in the US in itself kind of makes you explore a whole lot about yourself. Back in India, in my undergraduate, it was mostly like just firms coming up and picking you. Whereas in the US, I think, broadly, you have to reach out to employers. You have to kind of show an interest. And that kind of gets you also to explore into work you really want to do. For me, as I mentioned, I’m joining Amazon. That was something that I always wanted to do, join a big tech firm post-MBA because of my technical background. And I would say, overall, the process in itself is intense. Like, there are three things, whenever you think of a job, there are three things. One is the location, one is the industry, and the third is the role. Generally it’s easier to change one or the two. If you are an international student you are already changing the location. So thinking about what you really want to, what is the next thing that you want to look at, like industry or the role, is something that you want to keep in mind. Like, some people are able to change all the three things, but realistically, it’s like two things that you can change. – Well, to add to that, I’m probably changing location, industry, and role. I think it’s a matter of like introspection and see what you have, what’s your background, what are your transferal skills. We get that a lot from the very beginning. But it’s really important to understand what are your strengths and how you can take those strengths to a new industry or a new role and make sure that the company understands why you’re valuable for them. And after that, I think, things get easier. I agree that it’s really intense at first, reaching out to people, which I was not used to, but people here are really willing to help. Send a cold email and they reply back, and they offer you sometimes to chat, to go out for coffee, to let you know what opportunities they have. And also, researching the firms you want to work in, like the companies, and making sure that there are actually opportunities there. Just like, give up when you see it, this is not going anywhere. It doesn’t make sense to keep pushing sometimes. But it’s just a matter of how you build your strategy. – Yeah, I can talk a little bit more on kind of the logistics side of just getting the job and how employers, how they will kind of treat international students based on their status. Because to work in the US, if you don’t have a green card or citizenship here, the employer have to sponsor for your H-1B, which is a work visa. And currently, in recent years, it’s always more people wanting the work visa then there are available positions. So if you enter the H-1B so-called “lottery,” you get maybe like 60% or 50% of chance of getting the visa. But if you don’t get it, you don’t get to work in the States. So, after MBA you will have one year of OPT to kind of work in the States with your student visa, but after that, it depends on if you get the H-1B, the work visa, or not, to decide if you get to stay in the States. So, that kind of adds a level of complexity for the employer because they don’t want to have you for one year, train you up, and have to see you leave. Which makes it more possible for an employer who have international offices because they can transfer you back to your home office where you can just continue working for them. And therefore we see a lot of big tech firms, big consulting, banking firms, wanting to hire institutional students, whereas smaller firms or maybe startups will hesitate to hire international students. So, it’s always a conversation with the employer. And sometimes tell you often that is not possible. Sometimes it’s something you can negotiate with them. But it definitely adds a level of complexity. And it’s not impossible, because we all have got a job here. So, it’s just that keep that in mind. If you come to the States, you will have that kind of conversation with the employer, whereas if you maybe work in your home country, it’s always possible to get all kind of job you want. – I had a little bit of a different experience, and I can also talk to jobs back home. So I found that a lot of the firms that I applied to, while they didn’t even talk about the visa issue, were actually pretty receptive to it. It was a question of pitching yourself, showing what your value is. And at the end of the summer I did get an invitation to return from a company that isn’t one of the big tech firms. They’re based solely in Manhattan. And the other side of it is that I found that getting a degree here was highly, highly desirable back home. And I also received offers from companies back home in Israel solely based off of coffee chats and the fact that you got an MBA here. And it’s highly transferrable abroad and highly esteemed. – Yeah, great, thank you all. And just to pick up on what Shurui and Daniel were saying, a little bit about the visa process. Abigal Kies, who is assistant dean for our career development office unfortunately had a conflict and wasn’t able to attend this webinar, but we are in pretty constant communication about the job market and how things are looking. On the visa front for sponsorship in the US visas, some firms have pulled back a little bit in the last couple years. And so it’s not a sure thing, it’s not 100%. But it also is, I think Dan you were saying, even if they say no, you can still pitch, and they might say yes ultimately if you can make the case for why you should be someone to receive the visa. So what Abigail was saying is the career development office is actually working very hard to expand international opportunities. I know one of the questions that was asked was what are opportunities outside the US. We’ve always had a good number. They’ve worked hard to expand those so that that’s another option if working in the US doesn’t work out. And she also said that one strategy, especially for large firms, large consulting firms, for example, Bain and others, and maybe some banks, is that they can hire you and maybe want to hire you in your home country. So, if you’re from Germany, so start in Germany, and then after working there a little bit you can transfer back into the States. So that’s another strategy for if you want to be in the States working, if you start in your home country. I think she said that there’s a preference for starting in the country of your native language initially and then making the transition afterwards. So there are definitely different strategies. It’s not a cut and dry situation but something that is more nuanced and involves maybe more negotiation, more strategy than it might first seem. But thank you again for that. Maybe transitioning a little bit. Questions about the admissions process maybe hold off on that a little bit. But there are questions about, you know, in your time here at Yale, I guess both sides. What are some things that you experienced that international students shouldn’t miss, and maybe what are some of the challenges you’ve faced in the program? So the positives and maybe some of the negatives, more the challenges. I’ll let you all think. – I’ll start with the positives. – Okay, that sounds good. – Taking out the easier part. So, there are certainly a lot of positives to be in a campus like Yale as an international student. Of course, it’s one of the top education institutes here in the States and also in the world. So there are just tons of resources that you can leverage once you’re here, not only in SOM but also outside as well. If you’re interested in politics, if you’re interested in, I don’t know, bioscience, there’s always a talk that you can go to and learn more about the topics from just top notch speakers around the world. I think that is obviously a very great opportunity to just broaden kind of your views and your knowledge around topics you’re interested in. And, I think as international students definitely leverage resources on campus too. There’s the Office of International Students and Scholars, OISS. They have tons of events for international students just to get your more easy to transition into the life here. For example, Thanksgiving is coming up and they are organizing this thing for to match you with a local family and for you to join the local family for their Thanksgiving dinner. I think that is a great way to understand the culture here and also know people from here, to build your connection, your network, in this country. Yeah. – I think for me, I think the best part about Yale is kind of the resources that it has to offer. For example, I’m working on a consulting project with a big CPG firm as part of a course. And the team that I’m working with, like, I have a chef on my team, and then a social marketer that’s a marketing expert. And that kind of adds a lot to your experience altogether. You learn a lot from them, your peers. You learn a lot from the faculty in itself, which are very open to collaborating and talking to you, which I think was very different from my experience back in my home country in India. Apart from that, I think, as Shurui mentioned, the amount of resources that you have, sorry, the kind of support that you have is tremendous, especially as an international student. Like, coming to US in the first year, trying to kind of settle here and transition to student life in itself, like what the SOM faculty, the SOM staff, and the peers, like second years, kind of provided a great moral support as well as logistic support to kind of help you out, like figure out housing, figure all the important things that are to be done as you move your life, uproot your life altogether from your home country to a new country altogether. – Maybe I could just add some of the not so exciting parts. I mean, everything they’ve said is absolutely right. I think you have to realize that when you’re moving to the US, you’re moving to another country, which just like your country, has both good people, has bad people. It’s the same everywhere. Part of what, and maybe I had a role in this, but part of what I think has sort of made part of my time at Yale not so enjoyable has just been by landlady, my initial landlady. Luckily I moved. But the first year was a complete mess. It was rule flaking, windows broken, different things happening. And you would think in the US that’s not supposed to happen, but, you know, it does. And I actually had to go speak with Dean Scully about this and say, oh, why don’t we have protections for students, why don’t we have somewhere you can say, you know, my landlady is not performing her duties and all of that. And that can be a distraction. You can imagine if you have classes and then you have to be, you know, checking if some handyman has come to fix some stuff. That’s, I guess, external to the program. But I guess even within the program as well. You recall I’d say, for me, I’m here for people. And initially I think in the first few weeks I certainly felt like a lot of people were initially in their shells. It was easy to relate to people that came from your own country or that you had something in common with. I think a lot of that sort of thawed out over time and it was more generous relationships. So I would say, you know, just come with pretty realistic expectations and also a plan to sort of protect yourself. So for instance, on the housing issue, perhaps if I hadn’t waited until the very last minute to seek accomodations, maybe I wouldn’t have gotten into that particular situation. – So is that landlady now on everyone’s radar screen as a place not to rent from so that other people don’t have that same experience? We have Slack groups, there are different channels, there are different boards to be able to share information about housing and other resources. So I don’t know if that’s now kind of a thing where people know not to rent. – I was just glad to get out of there. (laughter) – First things first. – That should be an option. – No, that makes sense. I’m reluctant to followup, but any other thoughts about, so, unexpected things about the program, either positive or negatives, things that, when coming in, you had a sense of what you thought the experience would be like and now that you’ve been more than halfway through it you’re seeing things are different than you thought they would be, in either direction? – I would say that it exceeded my expectations. I’m having a lot more fun than I thought I would. It’s just been a great experience, and taking advantage of every minute. And unfortunately now I’m starting to count down the days until I graduate, so that’s weighing on me. But I would say that it exceeded my expectations. – Just to add more on the challenges front, I think the biggest challenge that you will face at Yale is that there are so many things happening. You have to really be able to figure out what you really want to do. Like in my first I was always running everywhere because I wanted to do everything. And second year has made me a bit wiser but not so wise enough. (laughter) So I’m still running around, but I think it’s a good thing that there are so many things, but you also have to kind of ensure that you do get into things that you can actually manage as well. So that has been a challenge. – There definitely is sort of the FOMO. The fear of missing out is definitely a thing. But Daniel, it’s good to hear that you’re having fun. I think Yale, some students have a reputation for being happy, which is not something you always associate with MBA students, but I think it’s a good thing that we have that reputation, that it’s actually something that you are experiencing in the program itself. Love to jump around a little bit. And actually this is one I can take, so I’ll give you all a break for a second. The question is about SOM offering scholarships for international students. And we definitely do. We actually just announced a new scholarship for students coming from India. And that’s been something that has gotten a little bit of attention, which is great. We also have scholarships dedicated to students from China. And then even if we don’t have sort of dedicated resources, all applicants are automatically considered for scholarship as we’re reviewing your applications. And we actually make those decisions at the same time we make admission decisions. And I think there’s a question about where they’re need based. We make those decisions based on merit, so it’s not need based, per se. But we definitely look to, in addition to merits, kind of merit plus. We also look at our interest in creating as diverse a class as possible. So, looking to make sure we have that diversity across all dimensions. Sort of geography, professional background, so race, ethnicity, gender. And so those considerations can help shape the scholarship decisions as well to make sure that we are increasing diversity and have a very sort of broadly based demographic class. The idea is that you will learn better from people who think differently and have different experiences than if you’re just sitting next to people who already think the same things you do. So that can weigh into the scholarship consideration as well. But we do offer scholarships even if we don’t have the dedicated scholarships, like for China, India, and a few others. Across the globe we offer scholarships to international students, definitely. And so that, that’s mine. And now they’re actually talking about are Indian students from tech backgrounds preferred. Well, you’ve got a lot of Indian students with tech backgrounds and there are a good number here, but we have students who have different background as well. So in tech they’re sort of with an interesting background and working in a tech firm. But in finance, sometimes in the social sector, in marketing. So, much like students from other parts of the world, from India we see show a broad diversity of backgrounds. I think tech is certainly represented, I don’t know if preferred. I think we look at each candidate individually as we make a decision, and we’re more driven by the strength of their candidacy, how compelling the candidate is in terms of their academic and professional potential as opposed to the specific industry. We’re not trying to sort of engineer certain outcomes in terms of industry breakdowns. But certainly tech is represented I think because it’s represented in the applicant pool as well. Okay, so that’s enough for me, for now at least. One question actually, was an interesting one. How do incoming students act with MAMs and second year students? So obviously, incoming students, you will take classes with your classmates. You’ll be in a cohort of 65 or 70 students, so you’re interacting primarily with your classmates but how do students interact with MAMs and second year students as well? – I can take that. Well, you don’t have an opportunity to interact with them in a class environment until the spring semester. But before that, during the whole fall semester, you talk to a lot of second year students. They provide a lot of support. The community is so tight knit here that even you know, our first exam, first year students come and wish us luck, even give us candy sometimes. I think the community sense makes everybody interact with most of the people. You don’t get to know everybody the first year. The good thing is that you can enjoy time outside of SOM as well. So each cohort normally is gonna organize an event between first years and second years, and then some mixers between the cohorts also from first years and second years. That’s a good opportunity to know more about the second years, what they did, what they’re doing after graduation, what they’re doing for recruiting, take their tips, for classes, for prioritizing between events, and don’t get FOMO sometimes. I think it’s just a matter of like how much time you spend inside the building. And I spent a lot of time here and am given a chance to talk to a lot of people. And as a second year right now I’m involved in something like admissions ambassador, or like career advisor, so that makes me interact a lot with the first years as well. – I think when you come in, like the first month in itself, is a lot of mixers between first year, second year. There are a lot of professional clubs and out of office, other clubs as well, at Yale, to which you get to interact with second years a lot. As Luis mentioned, they also provide a lot of support in terms of your recruitment, sharing all their experiences. Like, in my first year, I used to keep going back to a couple of second years that I knew very well, take all the sage advice that they had to give me, and I survived my first year, which in itself is tough because there are so many different things happening. So yeah, I would say, first semester you mostly interact outside of classes. In the second semester you do get to interact inside classes as well. Yeah, that’s it. – Yeah, and just to quickly add on that. Student government do have a specific committee just dedicated for second year and first year integration. So they will organize all kinds of events such as sports events. They will have closing bells, closing bells on Thursday after all the class ends. You have a chance to mingle with food and drinks, and you can just talk to everyone you want to. So, there are plenty of chances just created within the SOM student government society specifically for second year and first year, and they aim to interact with each other. – Okay, that’s great. And you had mentioned in an earlier answer about if you’re in New Haven over Thanksgiving, which is next week, being sort of matched with a family to spend Thanksgiving here. I know we also, I think last night and tonight was Friendsgiving, right? Did any of you go to that last night? – I am going tonight.
– You’re going tonight? Most of you are going tonight? Did you do it last year as well? So, I’d love to get a sense of your, and maybe explain what that is. And also I mentioned that’s an opportunity to interact with first year students as well. It may be MAMs as well. I think they’re invited too. – Do you want to go for that?
– Sure. It’s a really new tradition, it’s sort of last year, if I’m not… – I think that’s right, yeah. – Everybody, well not everybody, but a lot of people, come here to have dinner. It’s a traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Normally first years sit on one side of the table, second years on the other side. That’s on purpose, so we can like talk to each other. It’s a great opportunity to build a sense of community and feel at home even though you’re far away from home. Great food, by the way. I think it’s one of the things that show you how close to each other we are here between MAMs, second years, and first years. That’s one of the chances you have to interact with them. Something to add about that night last year? – This is actually my first year. But I’m super excited because it’s gonna happen in this building, in SOM, so you can already see all the tables setup with like very festive decorations. It just makes me really happy looking at it, and I’m super excited for dinner tonight. – It’s basically a traditional Thanksgiving dinner the week before Thanksgiving here in Evans Hall. It’s all setup now with very long tables where all of the students will sit together. It’s a new tradition, as Luis was saying, but I think it’s a great one and one that I’m sure will continue for years to come. Switching gears. So, we actually had a question from one of the attendees about resources for entrepreneurs, and I don’t know if any of you can maybe speak to that a little bit. I know that’s something we’ve built over the last few years, but love to get your sense of your experience. – I’m going out on my own. I hope to be an entrepreneur graduating to going into real estate. And I would say, first and foremost is the community and the people. One of the partners that I’m venturing out with is from SOM. So you’re surrounded by people that are driven and entrepreneurial. People here are an unbelievable resource. But beyond the people there is an entrepreneur suite and entrepreneur courses. We’re working with the Yale Law School now. They’re providing us legal services, and their professors who devote their time to fostering different entrepreneurial ventures. And I use the professors all the time, their entrepreneurial professors. They’re a ground sounding board, and potential investors, but we’ll see what happens. It’s just a great environment to take advantage of all these different resources. So, professors, the school resources, and the people. – The thing that I would add to it is given the current scenario around visas and immigration itself, I think the visa status that international students are on is a friend and if they’re looking to start something of their own during the school time, then you might just want to think about the visa implications of it. And I think there’s an OISS, which is the office for international students, which kind of looks after it. So they can provide you with all that support. But from what I know, like, a friend of mine had some issues around starting a venture of their own because of the visa status. If you have someone who has work authorization in the US, it’s definitely no issue if you are working with someone. But as yourself, if you’re looking to do something in the US, it might have some visa implications which you might want to be aware of. – That makes sense. A number of questions about the admissions process. And we have maybe 10, 15 minutes left, so I want to make sure we get to that and cover as much as we can. I would premise it by saying that we actually do have an application tips webinar coming up in the next few weeks that is dedicated specifically to the Yale SOM application. Members of the admissions committee go through each element of the application and talk about what we’re looking for, give some advice about how we approach it, how we think you might want to approach it. And so that’s a really great session that again, will be in the next few weeks. If you go on our website you can register for it there and that’s in advance of our round two application deadline on January 7th, so it’s great resource for more comprehensive application advice. In advance of that, maybe a couple questions, a couple thoughts about your experiences and any thoughts you have. One question, and I can start with this, there was an early question, actually, is work experience required for the program. Most of our students do have some amount of work experience. I would say the majority are somewhere between two to seven years. We do have some students with less than that and actually some students who come straight from undergraduate. We have a special program called the Silver Scholars Program where you can apply directly from your undergraduate experience in your final year and come to SOM without any work experience. So, most students do have work experience but it’s not required and there are some students who are coming as silver scholars straight from their undergraduate. So that’s just one question to answer. In terms of more broadly, I know you all are a little removed from the experience, but any advice you have from how you approached the application process, whether the application itself, or even just as you were doing your research and thinking about applying to Yale? Any insights I think would be welcomed. You have to sort of thing back to when you were in that mode. – I think it takes time. You need to take the time to, like you were saying, go back to it, let it rest for a while, go back to it and read it again. Don’t rush it. It takes a lot of authenticity from yourself, learning from what you are trying to do with the MBA, why you want to come here, what’s the next step in your career. And I think for me it was an exercise in being vulnerable during the whole process. It was completely different from planning for a master in (mumbling) management. And I learned a lot. I think one of the most important things in the whole process is to understand what school you want to go and understand what you value the most. I was really interested in the people, the community I was gonna be part of. You’re gonna be here for two years, so you want to make sure that you are with the right people to support your learning experience, but also to support your personal life as well because you are apart from home, but you build a new family here. So, that was really important for me. – I think one advice that I would give is just talk to as many people as you can, as many students as you can, from the particular school. For Yale I know that we have an admissions page where we have some campus ambassadors whom you can reach out to and they are generally very responsive. So you can pick and choose who you can relate to most, maybe the country or in the field that you want to be in. But just talk to more people. It will help you not only in the application process, and like writing the SAN, all of those things, but it will also help you just discover the school more and discover yourself more. – Totally agree with all of that. I think one thing I had to do was really do some soul searching and think about what I want to do short term, long term, who I want to be when I grow up. So those kind of soul searching helped me to narrow down my selection of schools. For example, if I know short term I still want to do consulting, I want to focus on schools with plenty of resources for consulting recruiting. And in the long term, if I think about switching my career to another country globally, I want to think about a school that has global impact and that global branding. So that helped me kind of narrow down my search and really be focused on each school I applied to. And also, in the application process itself, I think Luis mentioned being authentic. I think that was really important. Yale’s essay I think is a pretty special one. It talks about your personal commitment. I think for me that was the most interesting essay I’ve written throughout my application process and really put into it a lot of thought, a lot of effort into it, just thinking about why was I so committed to this thing I wanted to do. And I think that itself also helped me kind of just search through my mind and think about who I want to be in the long term. – And actually, one aspect of the question was any advice about the essay, which is, it’s rather distinctive, as you say. It’s describe your biggest commitment. And it’s something that we’ll talk about in the application tips webinar in more detail, but we’re looking for a single commitment that you would describe as the biggest one that you’ve undertaken. And we want to get a sense of what you did to demonstrate that commitment. So, we’ll go into more detail, but it definitely, I think, requires thought. It’s deceptively simple, and it requires you to really be kind of introspective, which I think is a good part of the process. I don’t know if anyone else has thoughts about the essay specifically, or why you chose Yale as you went through the application process. – I think just on the essay piece what I would say is, the admissions dean will have your resume. They will have all the other things which kind of highlight your achievements. This essay is more meant to know you better and like how the different things are connected across, like what drives you, what are the different, what is the connecting pattern between all the different things you have done in your resume. So just be aware of that. Don’t write your resume essay again. That doesn’t help. – Correct me if I’m wrong, but one of the things I hear a lot is that the commitment can also be commitment to an idea. It doesn’t need to be a commitment to a person. – No, I think that’s right. It could be that, but it should be a single commitment, and then you should talk about, if you commit to an idea, what have you done that shows that commitment. And it could be either personal or professional. It doesn’t have to be a professional commitment necessarily. So we’ll go more into that in the application tips webinar coming up. Shifting gears, we have time for maybe one or two more questions, so getting close to the end. We haven’t talked about the curriculum yet but there is a question. I’m just gonna read it to make sure I get it right. Do you feel that the integrated curriculum brings in more perspectives from across globe? Any class moments that were special? And just as you’re thinking about that, we have a different first year core curriculum than other business schools. We call it the integrated curriculum. It really tries to sort of break down the functional silos that other schools teach and cut across the silos and teach according to more an interdisciplinary perspective based approach. Which you can learn more on the website. This isn’t the time to go into detail. But as background to that question I just wanted to share that aspect of the experience. – I have one class I remember pretty well, which is Employee with Professor Balan. I used to work in the UN, an international organization, with trade unions. And in one of the classes we’re discussing if Uber drivers were not actually Uber employees. Clearly I was cold called and said, what do you think about this? What does the aisle think about this? Like from my perspective. And then I remember even, like, Daniel and some other classmates were like, whoa, I don’t think that’s like that. I think this is just another perspective we should take into consideration. And the debate was really, really cool. I think those are the kinds of things that happen when you get outside of the silos and you start to look at things in a more broader way. And I really like that. It was one of the classes where I started to talk more about this because I had more experience in that field. But at the same time there were a lot of classmates that had a different experience in the field, so it was really interesting. – I think I completely agree. I think the curriculum is… I think it’s just that if you really put your apply your mind to it as a non-ending stream of perspectives they will start to come out. A number of times I would prepare for a class and think that based on the homework I had everything nailed. And I would start talking in class and then it would be a different tangent entirely, you know, which makes you sort of think differently. So, I totally agree with Luis. I think it’s something that can really sort of change the way you think about stuff, the way you prepare for even real life events. And I think that’s invaluable. – I think, for me, integrated curriculum in general just really mirrored the real life situation especially happening in business and society. Whenever I think about, you know, a case or project I did for my consulting work, I really helped my client only solve one problem in finance. It’s always finance plus some kind of other functions. So, I think it really mirrors what’s happening in real life and give you the sense of reality, adding in all the complexity from other point of views. For classes specifically, I really like executive class in the spring. It’s kind of a class that I think really is the showcase of integrated curriculum for me because it brings in two different perspectives or professors every class, talking about one single case. And for each of them you are seeing a problem from different angles. Specifically I remember, in this class, talking about Cummins, the Chinese joint venture with the US company. And they brought in one of the executives in the China sector, talking about how is it like doing business with Chinese joint venture companies ever since the ’80s, which is just when China was opening up. And I think that gave me a fresh perspective. Even coming from China I didn’t know those kind of perspectives. And really enjoyed those kind of learning experiences through real life examples and listening to different opinions. – Yeah, that’s great. We’re almost at the end of time. We talked about careers earlier, and so, maybe as a form of closure, we have a very specific question about asking Luis and Ashish about your experience in recruiting in tech. I don’t know if you have anything you can share about that that would be relevant to the audience. – So, just in terms of the recruiting process for tech, I think for big firms they do come on campus, and they do recruit at Yale itself, so that’s always there. But apart from that, if you are looking to go into… So, there are so many tech firms that are coming up now that don’t necessarily recruit on campus, but there’s a good network of Yale that you can reach out to in the tech community and get a referral which will help you get into the roles that you want to be. Especially for tech, there are technical roles and non-technical roles. Getting into a non-technical role I would say is easier than getting into a technical role. A technical role would be something like a product manager. It’s just that the kind of background that they require is in itself unique. Getting into that would be more difficult compared to a non-technical role. But the kind of support that you have with the growing communities is good. Like, being in the west coast especially is easier, like down the east coast. But then you can always reach out to firms, to people, and get that reference that is very important for getting your resume seen in a tech firm. – I agree with Ashish. Technical roles are harder to get. Like, straight out of the MBA we don’t have a technical background. However, then getting to a non-technical background first and then transferring to a technical background, technical role, once you are in the company, for me was about reaching to people. Twitter did not come to campus last year. They’re probably coming this year. We had the strongest group for MBA interest last year, last summer. The thing is trying to understand what you want to show them that you can do for them. Coming to the career development office I was like, okay, I know a lot of statistics. And they’re like, okay, you know statistics, then you know data analysis. You don’t know statistics. Oh, okay. So you start to build the lingo that you need to show them. And then they’re gonna try, and they’re gonna be like, okay, we’re gonna test you. So you say you know this. What do you do with that? And you can show that you actually know that, you did it in a different industry, but you have the skills they need and that you can use that for the company. And then you just start building your own path through the companies. Some companies are easier, some companies are harder to get. It’s just a matter of like try, and then get one, and then you’re set in stone for the next role. I think that’s how it works. And just to add something, sorry, about that. The network, I think it’s really important. We didn’t have any SOM alumni in Twitter, but we had three alumni from Yale college reach out to them. They all replied back. They helped me to setup all my stuff in Twitter the first week I got there. They’re really, really helpful. So it’s a matter of like leveraging the whole network from the university. – That’s great, that’s great. As we’re winding down one question came in. So, describe the Yale SOM community in one word. If anyone wants to take that on. – Sorry, could you repeat the question? – The question is to describe the Yale SOM community in one word, that defines the community. – Eclectic, I think. – Supportive. – Inspiring. – I’d say powerful. – I’d say grounded. – Great, all good answers. I know you all have to get to class, so we’ll wind things down. This will be the last one. If you just generally, if you have any advice for students coming from outside the United States, any one thing that you would say that would be helpful that maybe you wish you knew when you were making the transition. Other than avoid that particular landlady. We know that one now. – I would just say, you know, come in with an open mind. I think everything you’re aspiring for I think you can get here. But I think you just have to be, you know, open minded, be a pleasant person. And don’t have undue expectations of other people, or even of the classes. I think just a lot of the learning and the value they are going to derive from this two year journey is just based on being conscious of the small value that surrounds you, talking to classmates, building relationships with people in your learning teams. Make sure you just stay an overall good part of the community. I think that would be my focus. – I think the kind of… You have to adapt a whole lot being an international student. So just be aware that you will need to kind of explore yourself, need to kind of change yourself a whole lot to be part of the American culture. It’s welcoming, but you also have to put in the effort to adapt and change yourself. – I would say bring all your energy, I mean persistence. It’s a long run. The first year is super intense. The second year, it’s now a little bit, but still, you’ve got to get that energy going for recruiting, for taking the most out of the experience. It’s two years of your life. And just make sure that you’re taking the most out of it. – I would say don’t be shy to ask for help. For me personally I have been here for seven years. I still run into questions. I still don’t know how things work sometimes. But the culture here at SOM is extremely supportive. And if you ask for help, someone will reach out and give you the resource to help you. I feel like culturally I was more hesitant to like bother people. But don’t be shy to ask for help if you ever need it. I think the community is here, the resource is here, you just have to ask for it. – In terms of planning, I think one of the things that I felt when I was going through the applications is that you can be a little bit detached from the schools because you’re looking at websites, and you’re talking to people. If you have the chance to visit schools and visit campuses so that you can understand what it is that you’re getting into, and perhaps give you the ability to fall in love with a school, which I think really helps the actual application. Come out to the campus. And even if you can’t make it, really immerse yourself with the people so you can get the feeling for the school despite the fact that you’re applying from wherever you are in the world. – That’s great. All great advice, thank you so much. I think we’ll end it there. We’re about five minutes before 10:00 eastern time. I’ll give you a chance to get to class and not feel rushed. Thank you all for taking the time to participate in this webinar. Hopefully it was helpful. Hopefully it gave you good insights and information about the Yale School of Management experience, especially for students coming from outside the United States. As I mentioned before, we have upcoming webinars. There’s one, another student experience webinar coming up, as well as our application tips panel in the new few weeks. So if you’re interested in participating in either of those, please go to our website and sign up. We’re happy to have you at those events as well. In the meantime, thank you again for being part of the panel. Thank you as well for participating. We look forward to continuing to be in touch. Bye.