How to Make Judo a High School and College Sport in the U S

How to Make Judo a High School and College Sport in the U S

October 22, 2019 2 By Stanley Isaacs


Hey guys, Preston here with another episode
of Grappler Going Abroad. Today I want to talk about how we can integrate Judo into
high school and college athletics. As I talked about in one of my prior videos, which I’ll
leave and annotation for, the U.S. can experience the same kind of success in Judo by following
the same plan as USA Wrestling by making Judo a scholastic sport. In my last video I discussed
the “Why” but never discussed the “How.” Well, for this video, I’m going to continue to use
wrestling as a blueprint for Judo’s success in the states. But first, we have to examine
wrestling’s history here in the United States. American Folkstyle or American Collegiate
Wrestling, as it’s called by some people, has it’s origins in Catch as Catch Can Wrestling
and Irish Collar and Elbow Wrestling. So what’s the difference between American Folkstyle
wrestling and contemporary Catch wrestling? Well, for one, american folkstyle wrestling
has no submissions or chokes. Catch wrestling still uses chokes and joint locks. The point
I’m trying to make, is the number one thing that you have to pitch to your state’s high
school athletic association or the NCAA is safety. But you might be thinking, “But Preston,
Judo has such a high injury rate, it’s impossible for us to pitch Judo as a safe sport.” Well,
this is only partially true, it’s true that Japan’s ministry of education’s Sport and
Youth Bureau has really put Judo’s safety to students into question. But Japan’s using
IJF rules for it’s domestic and scholastic competitions. Thats not really going to fly
here in the States. To make Judo a scholastic sport you’re essentially going to have to
de-fang the sport. That means no chokes, no armbars, and a greater focus on ukemi and
safety. So, my idea is we only allow Osae Komi in Ne Waza and we allow modified Kodokan
rules for stand up. Now if we do this, we might have grounds for pitching Judo as a
scholastic sport here in the states. Now the reason I say modified Kodokan rules is because
it will give the athletes more options for takesdowns and it will attract wrestlers,
but it will also allow coaches to still teach Judo as an art and sport that can be practiced
beyond high school. As for making Judo an NCAA sport, we can start implementing rules
that are a little bit closer to IJF rules. But here’s the kicker with the NCAA, marketing
Judo as a college sport is much easier because Judo is coed. Making it eligible for NCAA
title 9 money. But these are just some of my ideas. If you have any questions or want
to keep the discussion going, be sure to drop me an email or leave me a comment in the comment
section. Please like, share, also subscribe for more content. My name is Preston, and
this is Grappler Going Abroad.