How Do I Balance School & Social Life at College?

How Do I Balance School & Social Life at College?

October 1, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Entering college means
your schedule is about
to fill up fast. And I’m not just talking
about your courses. Getting involved in clubs
and organizations, hanging with your friends,
and your new-found independence are some of the best parts
of college. But it’s easy
to get overwhelmed. When I was in college,
I was balancing 20 credits, an internship,
being in a sorority,
and working a part-time job. But, I survived.
How? Say it with me,
time management. Stick around for some
of the best tips for balancing academics
and social life and not getting
burnt out. I’m CC Allen from Now This,
and you’re watching “A Student’s Guide
To Your First Year of College.” If you have an opportunity
throughout college to do more than just
go to class, do that.
All right, try some things on. Look for club opportunities. Find some mentorships. Volunteer in your community. And I only say that
if you can because a lot of us will have
a ton of stuff on our plates. So maybe that’s not your–
your thing that you’re able
to do ’cause you’re in a sport
or you’re, you know. but think about
all the experiences outside of the classroom that are gonna be
so much more important.( music playing )Today’s episode is all about
managing your time between school, social life,
and more. To make sure you get started
on the right foot, here’s Hashim Pipkin,
the Director of Communications at the Opportunity Network. There are a number of challenges
that can cause anxiety in stu– graduating 12th grade
and heading into college. It is a completely new
educational experience with a really robust
social element. But I think if you start
to unpack what actually are all the
elements that make up
your college experience, you’re better suited
to kinda negotiate and navigate
that landscape. How do you manage partying,
I guess, and studying? I do enjoy, you know
having fun with friends. You know, going out,
playing basketball. But I want to balance, like,
going to class and stuff because I do have to maintain
a 3.3 GPA. In terms of striking a balance
between academics and, kinda,
social life is really focusing too much
naturally on one or the other and not really taking time
to step back and reflect and take inventory of when
they are feeling drained. At the end of every week,
before the start
of the next week, take stock of what
the parties are for that unique
and particular week. And I think it’s really
imperative that students
in college, especially freshmen, start building the muscle memory
and habits around proactive planning
in alignment with what you want to actually achieve
that week. Find a network of close friends
that you feel can kinda guide you
and you them through these social
opportunities. Because always those social
opportunities should fall secondary to what is urgent
and top of mind for the reason
you’re at college, which is to get good grades,
achieve, but also have a good time,
right? So everything in balance. Did you practice good time
management your freshman year? The start of it, no.
( laughing ) The start of it,
I did not. I was just taking it
day by day. But I got better–
I had to get better with it
spring semester or I was not gonna
make it through. Time management,
becoming an adult, you need it. I schedule my weeks, like,
two weeks in advance. – That’s a good idea.
– It takes time and it takes practice,
but as long as you have
the layout of what you’re doing, – it really does help you.
– You do just have to know
your deadlines and when things
are getting done. You know, if your deadline
is on Sunday 11:59, I don’t think it’s smart
to go out on that Saturday and stay out till 4AM
in the morning. So I do think that it’s
important to, you know, balance between, you know,
going out and having fun ’cause, you know, you do need
your, you know, break days. But just make sure that,
you know, I’m here in college for,
you know, academics, so I need to, you know, keep a balance
between those two. If I have a regret,
it would be my only regret
about college, is how much time I spent
not doing anything, but also not enjoying that time
that I spent not doing anything. I was very active
on college campus. Football was the main thing
for me. My academics were right
after that. And so I would put in–
allot this much time for my prep for football, this was gonna be
my study time, and then whatever else
I had left I divvy that– either I was
going
to do something in community or social things on campus, but making sure that
my priorities were always taking
the majority of my time. Go out and have a good time. But also never forget
why you’re there. You wanna be involved,
you wanna be engaged, you wanna be involved
in your extracurriculars. You don’t what to spread
yourself too thin. But you do want to find
those things that you think, for whatever reason,
can add value to your collegiate experience. Be very careful and cautious about both the time
that you spend and who you’re spending
that time with. You know, people can think
sometimes because of college
life, it’s like, “Oh, I have all the time
in the world.” And the truth is is that
when you’re talking about
productive time, you don’t. So that time that you do have,
you want to be careful with it. So let’s recap.
One, focus on time management. Make a list of what’s at stake
in the week ahead.Two, forge good relationships.Bounce things off people
who are not afraid to tell you when you’re doing too much
or not enough. Thanks so much for watching “A Student’s Guide
To Your First Year of College.”