Honoring Marion Broome

Honoring Marion Broome

August 14, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[MUSIC PLAYING] I grew up in Charleston,
South Carolina. When I was around
seven or eight, my grandmother gave me
the book, Sue Barton, RN. And it’s a series of
seven or eight books. And I read it, and I fell
in love with nursing. I went into the
Army Nurse Corps. They actually paid
my last two years. And I thought it would be a
great adventure and it was. And that also shaped me
tremendously as a leader, as a leader clinician. The attraction for me
at Duke was not only the phenomenal reputation
it had and the ascendancy of the school that
a lot of deans watched during
the last 10 years, but also, that it was
coming home to the South. I first met Dr. Broome
probably over 20 years ago, when she was the president
for the Society for Pediatric Nurses. And I remember very distinctly
thinking how really fortunate we were to have somebody that
just presented themselves as so polished, so brave, so willing
to stand up for her beliefs. The first time I
met Dean Broome was on my first day of
orientation as a PhD student, where she came and
introduced herself. And that’s when I
learned that she was going to be co-teaching
my first course, Philosophy of Science and
Theory Development. She started as a
professor, as a dean, but then quickly
became a mentor, providing me with
opportunities to network or to meet influential
individuals. She is a dean, and a leader, and
an educator, and a scientist, and an advocate in support
of nursing research funding, and funding for education,
Population Health, social justice, and the
advancement of nursing education. She’s got that human touch. A great deal of this
touch is no doubt because she’s quite an
empathetic individual, so she understands people. And she can put
herself in their shoes, but she also understands
how to work with people. And she’s got that
perfect touch in terms of motivating not
just individuals, but a whole group toward
achieving a shared vision. Her leadership
abilities, her ability to transform the health
care environment, the academic environment– really speaks to somebody
that’s so well deserving of such a great honor. I join your major fan club and
congratulate you on this honor, and of your tireless work
on behalf of the nursing profession, and on behalf
of health and health care. Her accomplishments serve as
real pillars of distinction for others to emulate. But importantly, she’s not done. And so we can expect when
it comes to Dean Broome, that the best is
still yet to come. [MUSIC PLAYING]