Graduate Programs

Graduate Programs

October 10, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[MUSIC PLAYING] Hi, my name is Matthew Gordon. I’m a professor and
department chair of the mechanical and materials
engineering department. Now, we do have some
class-only masters, and that one you’re not
coming because of the faculty. You’re not doing research. So that one, I think,
people pick because– I mean, Denver. Biomedical engineering. We’ve got a good program. Our faculty are very strong,
even though you’re not doing research. So that one, I
think, some people come just because of
the program, maybe they’re already here. We have a one-year masters. Some people come
because it’s convenient. For some people it’s like,
this just works out for me. Or we’ve got a program
at Lockheed Martin, and I think they will supplement
or pay for some of the credits. And so that for some people
is how they determine, but if it’s on the research,
I think it’s the faculty. So I’m Chadd Clary. I am assistant professor in
the mechanical engineering department. I focus really on
medical devices. So when you design a
new medical device, before you put that implant
or device into a patient, you need to understand
how it’s going to perform, what the
safety profile is for, what the risk profile is. And so that’s really where
my research focuses on is providing the
ability for companies to understand that risk
and to mitigate that risk, enhance the performance
of the medical device before it ever goes
into a patient. So we do a lot of pre-clinical
testing, so mechanical testing, understanding the interface
with the host tissue or the body as well as doing a lot of
computational modeling, so using mathematical models
to predict the behavior and better understand what’s
going on with that device– actually goes into a patient. I’m Amin Khodaei. I’m an associate professor and
chair of the EC department. We keep the lights
on, and we do it in a way that is affordable,
sustainable, and reliable. We are building the
future of our systems. That’s my primary
area of research. By adding renewable energy
resources to the system, by adding electric vehicles,
batteries to the system and making sure that the system
is not going to collapse, at the same time,
we can move away from fossil fuel generation and
use renewable energy resources. My name is Matt Rutherford. I’m associate professor in the
Department of Computer Science, with a joint appointment
in electrical and computer engineering. My research is targeted
at unmanned systems, unmanned vehicles, robots,
and basically anything that requires what– it’s called
the real-time software– basically software that’s
going to be controlling a physical device or other– something else with high– sort of timing requirements. So in the lab that
we’re in right now– this is the Unmanned
Systems Research Institute– we do aerial vehicles, so quad
rotors and fixed wing aircraft, and some helicopters,
although helicopters are very difficult to work
with, and so in research, people are trending away from
working with helicopters. And then we also work
with ground robots. So basically cars or
other small robots that have wheels or ways of rolling. And then in the lab we also
have one underwater vehicle that we just recently
acquired, and we’re just starting to get
rolling on that, but I think that would be an
interesting– you know, in Colorado there’s a lot
of lakes, a lot of rivers. And I think we’re
sort of thinking about targeting some
applications in those areas. I am Rinku Dewri. I’m an assistant professor
of computer science here at the Daniel Felix
Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science. So my research centers broadly
around computer security and data privacy,
so all centered around demonstrating that
security and privacy doesn’t come for free– as in there’s always
some operation and cost involved with it. And unless we have a
quantitative understanding of this cost/benefit
play, it would be difficult to
provide a solution that will be attractive
for adoption, so it’s very important to get an
idea about this cost benefit. My name is Libby Bachman,
and I’m currently finishing the first
year of my masters in mechanical engineering. I was lucky to have gone here
for undergrad because I knew what I was getting into
with graduate school, and I knew kind of
what was being offered. I had taken a few
graduate classes, so I kind of understood
what it was like. But I do think it’s really worth
coming and talking to people, talking to professors
you’re interested in working with because I think that gives
you the best sense of what the program will be
like when you join it. So my name is Steven Conyers. I’m a PhD student here in
the electrical and computer engineering department. So I actually didn’t plan
to go to grad school, believe it or not. I had been doing some
research as an undergraduate for Dr. Mohammad Mahoor,
who works with socially interactive robots. And I had built a
couple robots for him, and he had asked if I was
interested in grad school, but the stipulation
was that I had to transition to the Electrical
Engineering department. And at the time, I
wasn’t sure how well I would be able to do as
an electrical engineer, but really found
that I’m equally passionate about
electrical engineers. So once I had wrapped
my head around the idea that it’s not black
magic, I really, really enjoy it just as much. I really enjoyed
my masters program. I ended up transitioning
into a project with building landing
platforms for these small UAVs. And it was really an opportunity
to be creative in a design aspect and also learn a lot. And it seemed to
me like there was no downside to
continuing on for a PhD because I had enjoyed
my masters so much. So when my advisors
offered for me to stay on and
continue for a PhD, it seemed like a
pretty easy decision.