Georgetown Graduate School Commencement and Doctoral Diploma Awarding Ceremony 2016

Georgetown Graduate School Commencement and Doctoral Diploma Awarding Ceremony 2016

November 19, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


(bell chimes) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (peaceful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music) (man laughing) (Dean Grzywacz speaking off mic) – Only ’cause some are way in the back. Yeah. – Good morning, everyone. Welcome to this glorious day, literally. President DeGioia, Vice Provost Bass, members of the University Committee, graduates, honored guests, welcome to the Georgetown University Graduate School Commencement Ceremony for the 2015-2016 academic year. (audience cheers) (audience applauds) Please stand for the singing
of the National Anthem. (“The Star Spangled Banner”) ♫ O say can you see ♫ By the dawn’s early light ♫ What so proudly we hailed at
the twilight’s last gleaming ♫ Whose broad stripes and bright stars ♫ Through the perilous fight ♫ O’er the ramparts we watched ♫ Were so gallantly streaming ♫ And the rockets’ red glare ♫ The bombs bursting in air ♫ Gave proof through the night ♫ That our flag was still there ♫ O say does that
star-spangled banner yet wave ♫ O’er the land of the free ♫ And the home of the brave (audience applauds) Please remain standing for the invocation offered by Rabbi Rachel Gartner, Director of the Jewish Chaplaincy. – A teaching and a prayer. The Torah teaches Moshe saw
a bush, and it was on fire. (Rachel singing in Hebrew) Moshe said, “I will turn aside now “and look at this great site.” As we begin the commencement
proceedings this morning, let us first pause and turn aside and really look at this great site to see the fire and the
beauty that’s so alive in it, the simple radiance of the
sunshine, at long last, the warmth that flows between
teachers and students, mentors and mentees, parents and children, friends and their dear friends, the resplendence of the work
of our hearts and of our minds having come to fruition. So as we look well at this moment and feel its abundant blessings, we can do nothing but feel
profoundly grateful for it and the people with whom we share it with. As we embark on the 2016 commencement proceedings
of the Graduate School, may all of us gathered here be blessed with humble gratitude and audacious joy. With true humility and
with unbridled delight, we call our awareness to every
lesson, hard or easily won, every person, teacher, friend,
parent, child, staff person, every sacrifice, ours and those of others, and every ounce of good fortune that has brought each of us
to this moment in our lives. And so we pray. (speaking Hebrew) Or in the language of my
Muslim brothers and sisters, (speaking Arabic) Blessed are you in your comings and goings and your arrivals and
in your leave taking. God, Who we feel in
the comings and goings, the changes and transformations,
the very dynamism of life, we are grateful for all our graduates and for the unique
gifts each has been able to give and receive from one another since they arrived here years ago. May the abundance we feel
satiate us fully in this moment, and yet, as we prepare to set forth on the many paths that lead
them out from these gates, may all that they are about
to hear and reflect upon instill in them a restlessness of spirit. May the example of our honoree, a winner of awards for courage and for engaging her writing
in the pursuit of justice, may her example inspire our
graduates to likewise go forth and engage what they have
learned in these hallowed halls in ways that heal and enrich our world well beyond the hilltop. One day, may every single
woman and man, boy and girl, experience for themselves the
abundance we celebrate for us, for ourselves today. And until that glorious day, dear God, be with our graduates. Continue to shape them into
ever wise and just partners in fulfilling Your vision
in which every human being, like us, is educated and
empowered, resourced and respected, loved and loving, so they too
will be able to turn aside and look at their lives and rejoice. (singing in Hebrew) ♫ And join me in saying ♫ Amen Please be seated. – It’s now my pleasure to
introduce to you Dr. Randall Bass, Georgetown University
Vice Provost for Education and professor of English. – Thank you, Dean Grzywacz. I don’t know if you all have been tracking the weather for tomorrow
the way that we have, but if you have, then you
have yet one more reason to thank God it’s Friday. (audience laughs) It’s my pleasure to welcome our guests to this commencement ceremony
for the Graduate School. I do so on behalf of the
Provost, Dr. Robert Groves, whose own son is graduating
this weekend elsewhere, and on behalf of the entire academic community at Georgetown, faculty, administrators, staff, and these students who
are seated before me who will momentarily become
our newest graduates. As Vice Provost for Education, I’m privileged to help lead our efforts to continually strengthen what
it is that we try to do here. We’re trying to imagine
a future for Georgetown that will deliver on the challenge of not only the best possible education, but a distinctly Georgetown education, built on and equal to its past. For me, it’s a particular pleasure to be able to share
this day and this moment with my extraordinary faculty
colleagues seated behind me who take so seriously both the educational and the research missions
of the University, not only to inform our
students intellectually, but also to form them as people of character and ethical judgment to whom we can safely entrust
not just Georgetown’s future, but indeed the future of the world. And to you, our guests, to the families and support
networks of our students, we acknowledge with thanks
the role that you have played in getting these people
to the finish line. We watch along with you
today with considerable pride as these students move on to
the next phase of their lives, continuing the promise of a
life of purpose ready to unfold. We are happy to celebrate
with you this glorious day, filled with excitement for
what is about to commence. So welcome to our guests, and to our graduates, welcome home. – Thank you, Vice Provost Bass. Our founder, Most Reverent John Carroll, the first archbishop of Baltimore and first Catholic bishop
in the United States, took legal possession of
land on our hilltop in 1789, and we mark that as our founding date. Our first student, the future North Carolina
congressman William Gaston, arrived in 1791, and our
first bachelor’s degrees were not awarded until 1817. In 1815, with enrollments
passing the hundred mark, the president of the college, Father John Grassi of
the Society of Jesus, asked the then Congressman Gaston to present a petition
for a federal charter, a document that still today sanctions the academic business that we do here. Our custom is to initiate
academic ceremonies with a reading of that charter. To discharge that office, I’m pleased to introduce to you Mr. Edward M. Quinn,
Secretary of the University. – An act concerning the
College of Georgetown in the District of Columbia. Be it enacted by the Senate
and House of Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled that it shall and may be lawful for such persons as now are,
or from time to time may be, the President and Directors
of the College of Georgetown within the District of Columbia, to admit any of the students
belonging to said College, or other persons meriting
academical honors, to any degree in the faculties, arts, sciences, and liberal professions to which persons are usually admitted in other Colleges and
Universities of the United States, and to issue in an appropriate form the diplomas or certificates
which may be requisite to testify to the
admission of such degrees. Signed Langdon Cheves, Speaker of the House of Representatives, John Gaillard, President
Pro Tempore of the Senate. Approved March 1st, 1815, James Madison. – We are honored to have as
our special guest this morning Elena Poniatowska Amor. (audience applauds) She’ll be presented with the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters Honoris Causa. The citation for Miss Poniatowska Amor will be read by Dr. Gwen
Kirkpatrick, Professor and Chair of the Department of
Spanish and Portuguese. (audience applauds) – Reasonable, just, and necessary. Those are among the first words of our honoree’s remarkable study, Communique, Voices from the Jungle, Subcomandante Marcos and Culture. Those words also speak to key values for her life and her work, which is why it is not
only reasonable and just but also in a real way necessary that Georgetown pay homage today to a remarkable literary
and historical figure, someone rightly called the
grande dame of Mexican letters. The daughter of French
Polish immigrants to Mexico, she was once described by the great Mexican
painter Diego Rivera as, “The little Polish girl who
asked too many questions.” And to this she concurs, “I will always be that way,” she has said. “I was always asking too many questions, “and I’ll be that way until I die.” But there can never be too many questions. For the reasonable mind,
the reasoning spirit, no single answer, no range of answers, ever exhausts the need to question. It is no surprise, then, that she has linked her
own practice and writing to what we also do here
at Georgetown, education. For over 30 years, she has taught a weekly workshop in writing. And when she speaks of
reform in her own country, she speaks and writes not of
revolution, but of reform, specifically reform in
what she describes as, “The dire situation of
the rural teachers.” Democracy, real democracy, she insists, can come about only if her
country educates all Mexicans. All her work, particularly
in her unique crossing of literary fiction and
historical investigation, has been marked by the
struggle to bring justice to those deprived of it, often deprived by those
with the sworn obligation to administer justice to others. For more than 50 years, she has blurred conventional boundaries between fiction and reporting, pursuing her chosen mission
as writer and as advocate to do nothing less than change Mexico. Indeed, this remarkable career also blurs any significant distinction between writing and advocacy. Her protagonists’ causes are her own, women, farm workers, miners,
other exploited laborers, students, the indigenous people. In many cases, she has been the only voice to speak for those who have been abused, tortured, and killed. In what many consider her greatest work, La Noche de Tlatelolco,
Massacre in Mexico, she reveals the shocking facts of the terrible massacre
of student protesters in October of 1968. Hers was the only book published on this subject for 20 years. It was only the power of her prose, the authenticity of her witness, and her unparalleled personal prestige that saved her from the silence others less famous and
less skilled endured. She refused her nomination for the coveted Villaurrutia
Award in the 1970s, saying to the president of Mexico, “Who is going to award a prize “to those who fell at Tlatelolco in 1968?” And it is that utterly fearless insistence on speaking and writing truth to power that makes not just her work
but her presence necessary in a world in which thousands of people go missing every year, in which crime is more likely to be propagated than persecuted. Her books, her investigations,
her voice, her life, all crusade for a rational
response to a criminal society, for justice scourging corruption, for necessary truth exposing
the otherwise inevitable lie. Saint Ignatius, the
founder of the Jesuits, insisted faith must always translate into working for justice. His spirituality finds a
kindred spirit and voice in the work of the woman we honor today. And so, for her perfection of style and originality of invention, but most importantly for
her courage and compassion, Georgetown University with profound homage today confers on Elena Poniatowska Amor the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters Honoris Causa. (audience applauds) – By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Congress of the United States and by the board of directors
of Georgetown University, I officially confer upon
Elena Poniatowska Amor the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters Honoris Causa. It is now my pleasure to present Georgetown’s newest alumnus, who will deliver the commencement address. (audience applauds) – I’m gonna stand up because
I’m so short. (laughs) I’m as short as a sitting dog. (audience laughs) Well, I hope this beautiful
day continues all your lives. And I wanna tell you a little bit what it means to write in Latin America. To write in Latin America
has a different meaning than it has in the United
States or in Europe. I suppose the same
thing happens in Africa. Public and political issues
interfere in personal life. Latin America is always out
there behind the window, watching, spying, ready to jump. The street enters through the door. People find their way in. They look at you while you’re sleeping, eating, or making love. The past is public. In great American cities,
everyone has something to do. People go somewhere. They walk quickly. They never turn their heads
to look at their neighbors. In Latin America, in Mexico,
no one has anywhere to go. Thousands and thousands of people with nothing for themselves, nothing, not a single opportunity. Their empty hands hang near their bodies, in front of their mouths,
on top of their knees, their waiting hands without any use. All these human energies, they’re wasted. They look. They wait. They fall asleep. They wait again. Nobody loves them. Nobody misses them. They’re not needed anywhere. They are nobody. They do not exist. So much to do in the world,
and there is no place for them. So much lost energy. There is no one to tell them, “Let’s go. “Let’s get up. “Let’s get going. “Let’s save. “Let’s build.” Outside my window, the
multitude is always present, ready to burst in. Life is very resistant. People, the same cannon fodder that nourishes great
universal misfortunes. Los condenados de la Tierra, the wretched of the Earth,
as Frantz Fanon called them. Suddenly, during an earthquake,
one of them saves your life. You have no idea who he is or she is. There is no way to thank them. They don’t expect to be thanked. You never see them again. They saved our lives. They are always frightfully present. As Carlos Fuentes puts it, the 2,000 mile borders between
Mexico and the United States is the only visible border between the developed
and the developing world. It is also the border between Anglo-America and Latin America, but it is an unfinished border, made up of walls, wire fences, barriers, which are hastily erected
by North Americans to keep out the Hispanic immigrants. Donald Trump is not the only
one who cried out for war. Previous candidates were supported by Americans who desire the same. Donald Trump is not alone. He represents the frustrations of racists who comb his hair every morning. The frontier is simple– (audience applauds) The frontier is simple to cross where the Rio Bravo is shallow
or the hills abandoned, but it is difficult to
reach the northern side, and many men and women who are lucky enough to cross the river die afterwards while crossing the desert or when they are run down
by a car in a highway. In between is a no man’s land where the immigrants
must brave the clutches of the US border patrols, the
helicopters, searchlights, and other modern technology devices besides their own thirst. Our immigrants are so desperate
that they are willing to die rather than stay on the Mexican side, arriving mostly from Mexico, but also from Central America
and as far south as Columbia, as well from the Caribbean. They enter the United
States for economic reasons. The main reason is hunger. Their own countries are not
capable of feeding them. A huge number of illegals use to drown themselves
in the Bravo River, and many more died every
year at the border. Now, drug cartels have reached a climax, and Chapo’s men dredged the
American jail awaiting him. The Spanish Empire extended as
far north as Oregon in 1848. The Mexican Republic inherited
vast, underpopulated lands and lost them to the United States. Mexico lost half of its territory, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, California, and Utah, six states that are now
American states of the Union. Just the Spanish names are a proof of how Latin were the southern states that once belonged to our country. Los Angeles, Los Angeles,
Sacramento, San Francisco, Santa Barbara, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, San Bernardino, Monterey, Santa Cruz. The United States has continued to expand. More than any other power in the world, the United States has acquired land, land, land, land, land, and
the people on those lands. Alaska, Florida, Louisiana,
Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Philippines, the Virgin Islands, Hawaii, are now part of the most
powerful country in the world. The price Americans pay
for the Monroe doctrine is that the immigrants keep coming, not only to the Southwest, but up to the East, New York, Boston, and
Chicago, and to the Midwest. They all join to make more than 51 million Hispanics
in the United States, the vast (mumbles) majority of Mexican origin, but many from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Central and South America. Mexicans are still the fastest
growing minority in the USA. And if before they were
janitors, now many of them have better social position
than Native Americans. Spanish is now a national language. San Antonio has been a
bilingual city for 150 years. By the middle of the
coming of this century, almost half the population
of the United States will be Spanish speaking. A whole civilization with
a Hispanic background has been created in the USA. Noam Chomsky declared, “It is impossible “for a third world country
to defend itself by forces “because it will be crushed. “It has to fight politically “and use political opportunities.” Latin America is recovering
many of its territories through migrant tactics, as Mexican and Central and South American come to settle here. Are we still being conquered? In many ways, we are. Throughout our local dictatorships, we are still conquered by our ignorance, our lack of technology, our
very corrupt politicians, our political backwardness,
our political parties, our bad philosophies, our own misery, our lack of opportunities, the very heavy weight of Catholic religion that teaches us that we
will be happy in Heaven and should reference tradition. Christian Spain lives in our countries, but the Anglo-Saxon USA has
a very definite influence. ALl literature and philosophies
meet in our culture, philosophies meet in our culture that had built extraordinary cities like Teotihuacan, Uxmal,
Monte Alban, y Chichen Itza. Before the founding fathers
disembarked in New Amsterdam, and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the greatest poet of our continent, had written Primero Sueno and was considered by Octavia Paz the greatest poet of our continent. However, in 2016, only
very few Latin Americans, especially women, have
access to education, and less to culture. I always remember a young
Mexican peasant girl who once asked, “Why do I have to go to school “if I’m going to continue eating beans?” It was difficult to convince
her in her dirt floor house that if she went to school
her life would change. I would’ve loved to end
with a happier note, but the time has yet come for rejoicing. Jesusa Palancares, the heroine
of Hasta no Verte, Jesus Mio, Here’s to You, Kid Jesus,
thinks very little of herself. If I had money, I would
be considered Mexican, but I am worse than dirt. I am nothing. That’s right. That’s right, that’s what I am, garbage for the dogs to
pee on and keep on walking. The wind comes and blows it
away, and that’s the end of it. There’s nothing else for me to be. I’ve never been worth anything. My whole life, I’ve been this
same good for nothing germ you’re looking at right now. Yet, there is hope, because
Mexicans have not lost the antique voice of their ancestors. Under the influence of the
ceremony of sacred mushrooms which she had eaten in
the mountains of Oaxaca in which she acted as a priestess, the Indian medicine woman Maria Sabina spoke the voice of the Earth and chanted while giving away the
psilocybin or psilocybine, which in Switzerland was
transformed into LSD, “Porque soy la mujer estrella dios, “la mujer Estrella Cruz. “Porque puedo nadar en el Grandioso. “Porque soy la mujer sabia medicina. “Soy mujer piedra del Sol sagrada. “Soy mujer que mira es el dentro. “Soy la mujer Jesucristo,
soy la mujer Jesucristo, “soy la mujer Jesucristo. “Soy mujer ca-tre-na. “Soy mujer Estrella Grande. “Soy mujer Estrella Cruz. “Soy mujer de luz.” Because I am the star god woman. Because I can swim in infinity. Because I am the wise medicine woman. I am the sacred stone Sun woman. I am the woman who looks within. I am the Jesus Christ woman,
I am the Jesus Christ woman, I am the Jesus Christ woman,
I am the Jesus Christ woman. I am the Cross Star woman. I am the Big Star woman. I am a woman of light. Thank you very much for listening. (audience applauds) – Before we present the
candidates for the PhD, we are pleased to honor
three of our graduates with the Harold N. Glassman
Dissertation Award, recognizing the distinguished scholarship that earned each of them the PhD. While recognizing the quality
of these dissertations, the Glassman Awards are also prospective, anticipating the contributions that these young scholars will make to their communities of
learning in the future. I ask each awardee to stand
as the citation is being read. Dr. Erin Stewart Mauldin. (audience applauds) Dr. Erin Stewart Mauldin is the recipient of the
2016 Harold N. Glassman Distinguished Dissertation
Award in the Humanities for her dissertation,
Unredeemed Land, US Civil War, Changing Land Use Practices and the Environmental Limitations of Agriculture in the South, 1840 to 1880, which she defended with
distinction in June of 2014. She was mentored by University
Professor John R. McNeill. Using primary source materials such as farm and plantation
records, soldier’s letters, family papers, as well
as government documents, and attending to scientific matters such as soil nutrients
and animal diseases, Dr. Mauldin’s dissertation is an ambitious and comprehensive examination of the effects of the Civil War
and the abolition of slavery in 19th century Southern agriculture. Beginning with the
Antebellum South of the 1840s and continuing beyond
the end of Reconstruction to the early 1880s, the
dissertation, Dr. Mauldin posits, “Revisits the questions
historians have long asked “regarding the importance
of the Civil War, “the impoverishing nature of
post-war cotton production, “and the periodization of 19th
century Southern history.” The dissertation is an
important contribution to environmental history,
Civil War history, Southern history, and the
history of agriculture. In the words of her mentor,
it is a, “tour de force “and among the very best
dissertations I have ever read. “It certainly ranks with the
best I have ever directed.” Dr. Mauldin is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Samford University
in Birmingham, Alabama. The Graduate School is very
proud to award Dr. Mauldin the Glassman Dissertation
Award in the Humanities. (audience applauds) The next recipient is Dr. Anne Calderon. Anne, can you please rise? (audience applauds) Dr. Anne Calderon is the recipient
of the Harold N. Glassman Distinguished Dissertation
Award in the Social Sciences for her dissertation, Level of Intake, Depth of Processing, and Type of Linguistic
Item in L2 Development, which she defended in 2014. Dr. Calderon completed
her Ph.D. in Spanish, concentrated in Applied Linguistics, under the mentorship of
Professor Ronald P. Leow. Dr. Calderon is the first researcher in the second language acquisition field to probe empirically into potential levels of the grammatical and lexical information that learners take in
initially, termed intake, during exposure to the
second or foreign language. To address the roles
of depth of processing and both grammatical and lexical items in the input play in the
second language development, Dr. Calderon employed two concurrent data elicitation procedures to provide an innovative way
to gather evidence of both levels of intake and depth of processing before statistically
addressing their effects on subsequent second language development. To establish the levels of intake, Dr. Calderon used the
eye-tracking procedure that measures learners’
eye gazes and fixations, while to address how learners
processed such intake, she used concurrent verbal reports or the think aloud procedure where learners thought
aloud their thoughts as they interacted with
the experimental data. It is the first study of its
kind not only at Georgetown but in the field of second
language acquisition to utilize both eye-movement recordings and think aloud protocols to
operationalize and measure the early stages of L2 learning. Dr. Calderon is an Assistant
Clinical Professor of Spanish at The Catholic University
of America in Washington, DC. The Graduate School is very
proud to award Dr. Anne Calderon the Glassman Dissertation
Award in the Social Sciences. (audience applauds) Next up is Dr. Bridget Queenan. (audience applauds) Dr. Bridget Queenan is the recipient of the Harold N. Glassman Distinguished Dissertation
Award in the Sciences for her dissertation, Synapse
and Cell Specific Plasticity in the Mature Hippocampus,
which she defended in 2014. Dr. Queenan earned her
Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the Interdisciplinary
Program in Neuroscience. She was mentored by Professors Daniel T.S.
Pak and Stefano Vicini. Dr. Queenan’s dissertation examines how neurons involved in memory formation change their connections
with other neurons, and specifically how these neurons form new and strong connections
while maintaining networks that are continually
adaptable through life. Using in vitro and in vivo assays for mapping hippocampal activity, she could identify a process termed homeostatic synaptic plasticity occurring at a distinct subset of synapses in the hippocampus, the structure vital to
forming new memories. This process, she discovered,
was regulated by opioids and could delay seizures in
an animal model of epilepsy by acting as a volume
control in the hippocampus, effectively reducing
neuronal excitability. The impact of her research results, as stated by one of the
mentors, “Are groundbreaking “because they force a paradigm shift “in the basic underlying principles “that govern homeostatic
regulation of brain cells,” and further, “that homeostatic
regulation can be harnessed “to slow the development
of seizures in mice, “potentially leading to
improved therapy for epilepsy.” Dr. Queenan currently serves as the Associate Director
of the Brain Initiative at the University of
California Santa Barbara. The Graduate School is very proud to award Dr. Bridget Queenan the Glassman Dissertation
Award in the Sciences. (audience applauds) Congratulations to all our Glassman Dissertation
Award recipients. We’ll now have the
presentation of candidates for degrees in course. Will the candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy please rise? President DeGioia, as Dean of the Graduate
School of Arts and Sciences, I have the honor to present to you the candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy. Professor Wayne Davis will name the individual
candidates as they are hooded. Will the candidates for
the Doctor of Philosophy please approach the stage? – Fathiya Al Rashdi, PhD in linguistics. (audience applauds) Luke Amo … (bell chiming) Luke Amoroso, linguistics. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) Marta Baffy, linguistics. (audience applauds) Michael Barker, economics. (audience applauds) Sweta Batni, global and
infectious diseases. (audience applauds) Keith Bentley, chemistry. (audience applauds) Hal-ey Books, government. (audience applauds) Luisa Boyarski, government. (audience applauds) Enrique Bravo-Escobar, government. (audience applauds) Ashley Ki-ya, Spanish. (audience applauds) Antoinette Cordova, tumor biology. (audience applauds) Anne de Lot Mies, tumor biology. (audience applauds) Jennifer Raymond Dresden, government. (audience applauds) Lisette Marie Fred, chemistry. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) Zackary Gardner, history. (audience applauds) Rebecca Davis Gibbons, government. (audience applauds) Daniel Ginsberg, linguistics. (audience applauds) Kelly Hammond, history. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) (audience applauds) Grace Jang, chemistry. (audience applauds) Jang Jin, biology. (audience applauds) Christopher Kane, chemistry. (audience applauds) Denise Kripper, Spanish. (audience applauds) Go for it. Pietro Lorenzo Maggioni,
theological and religious studies. (audience applauds) Sylvia Mar-o-wan, Spanish. (audience applauds) Anna Markowitz, psychology. (audience applauds) Barry McCarron, history. (audience applauds) Torsten Menge, philosophy. (audience applauds) Tsion Minas, tumor biology. (audience applauds) William Moore, computer science. (audience applauds) Briana Morgan, government. (audience applauds) Jacob Mortenson, economics. (audience applauds) Fuad Naeem, theological
and religious studies. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) Maria Jose Eleonora
Navia Tor-el-li, Spanish. (audience applauds) Yayun Pan, economics. (audience applauds) (audience laughs) (audience laughs) Hae In Park, linguistics. (audience applauds) Jon Parker, computer science. (audience applauds) Rachel Blum, government. (audience applauds) Success. (audience applauds) Agnieszka Postepska, economics. (audience applauds) Robert Ricks, Arabic. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) Alan Roe, history. (audience applauds) (audience laughs) Zaya Rustamova, Spanish. (audience applauds) Ah-shom Sol-om, government. (audience applauds) Chien-cheng Shih, pharmacology. (audience applauds) Yoonsang Song, linguistics. (audience applauds) Jason Soo, computer science. (audience applauds) Elizabeth Steidle, biology. (audience applauds) Wesley Stepp, microbiology. (audience applauds) Megan Stewart, government. (audience applauds) Hardest part. Chelsea Stillman, psychology. (audience applauds) Henry Tan, computer science. (audience applauds) Kevin Tosh, microbiology. (audience applauds) Amelia Tseng, linguistics. (audience applauds) (audience laughs) She did get her PhD. (audience applauds) Larisa Veloz, history. (audience applauds) Zachary Warren, psychology. (audience applauds) Shuang Wen, history. (audience applauds) Andrew Whitten, economics. (audience applauds) Elizabeth Williams, history. (audience applauds) Normally the dissertation
is the hard part. (audience laughs) Charisse Winston, neuroscience. (audience applauds) Bryce Yoshimura, physics. (audience applauds) Sarah Young, linguistics. (audience applauds) Shiyu Zhang, chemistry. (audience applauds) Laura Zimmermann, psychology. (audience applauds) Jovana Zujevic, Spanish. (audience applauds) (Wayne laughs) (audience applauds) – Right. Will all the candidates for the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy please rise? President DeGioia, these
candidates have been duly examined and recommended by the faculty and approved by the board of directors. I therefore ask you, bestow
upon them the degree in course. – By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Congress of the United States and by the board of directors
of Georgetown University, I officially confer upon these candidates the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Congratulations.
(audience applauds) – President DeGioia, as Dean of the Graduate
School of Arts and Sciences, I have the honor to present
to you the candidates for the degrees of Master
of Global Human Development, Master of Science, and Master of Arts. Candidates for the Master degrees will be asked to stand
by disciplinary group and the degree awarded. After all the candidates
have been presented and the degrees conferred, the master’s candidates will
be led to separate locations, where the ceremony will continue with individual recognition
of the candidates by their faculty and
distribution of the diplomas. Their family and friends will
be invited to follow them. The three disciplinary
groups include programs associated with the
School of Foreign Service, the Biomedical Sciences,
and the Arts and Sciences. Each group will be asked to rise in turn and to don their hoods. I would ask our guests
to withhold the applause until all the candidates
have been presented and President DeGioia has
conferred their degrees. Will the candidates for the
degree of Master of Arts in programs associated with
the School of Foreign Service please rise? Will the candidates for the degree of Master of
Global Human Development in the School of Foreign
Service please rise? Will the candidates for the
degree of Master of Science in the School of Foreign
Service please rise? I invite the standing
candidates to don their hoods. (audience laughs) Please be seated. Will the candidates for the degree of Master of Science in the
Biomedical Sciences please rise? (audience applauds) I now invite you to don your hoods. Please be seated. Will the candidates for the
degree of Master of Arts in the Arts and Sciences
programs please rise? And will the candidates for
the degree of Master of Science in the Arts and Sciences
programs please rise? I invite you to don your hoods. Please be seated. Will all the candidates
for master’s degrees now please rise? (audience applauds) President DeGioia, these
candidates have been duly examined and recommended by the faculty and approved by the board of directors. I therefore ask you, bestow
upon them the degrees in course. – By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Congress of the United States and by the board of directors
of Georgetown University, I officially confer upon these candidates the degrees of Master of
Global Human Development, Master of Science, and Master of Arts. Congratulations. (audience applauds) – Now will all the candidates,
the graduates, please rise? You already have your degrees. Today, you have formally joined a community of scholars,
teachers, and professionals whose bond of practice and principles transcend national boundaries. For scholars, ours is a
community characterized by a fundamental belief
in careful investigation, in rational conversation and disputation as the best path to knowledge. As teachers, we care for the whole person. Thus, we pay individualized attention to the needs of our students, distinct respect for their unique circumstances and concerns, and appreciation for their
singular gifts and insights. Finally, as professionals,
we strive to work at the highest levels
afforded by knowledge. But as we confirm this work, we will always remember our privilege and thus keep our hearts
turned to the common good. Therefore, in welcoming
you to our community, I hope and trust that you will help to continue our great
conversation of learning, and I look forward to your contributions. I now invite the faculty and the families and
friends of the graduates to join me in congratulating
the graduates. (audience applauds) And I now invite you, the
graduates, to join me in thanking your families, friends, and the teachers for the support and encouragement that they have provided you. (audience applauds) Please be seated. I’m now happy to introduce to you the President of Georgetown University, Dr. John J. DeGioia. (audience applauds) – Well, thank you very
much, Dean Grzywacz, for that introduction
and for your leadership of our Graduate School
of Arts and Sciences. On behalf of our community, I also wish to express our gratitude to Elena Poniatowska Amor for making this very special
day that much more special by sharing with us perspective and insight that she’s gained through her life’s work. Thank you again. (audience applauds) It is a great privilege to be
here with all of you today, to share this moment with you, our graduates of the class of 2016, with your families, with our community here in Washington, DC. A word of gratitude to
the many individuals who have been here for you, those fellow students,
colleagues, mentors, loved ones, who have provided you with the support to help you work toward your aspirations, to realize your dream. To Dean Grzywacz and to the faculty of the Graduate School
of Arts and Sciences for their contributions over
the course of this past year, for their commitment to excellence in teaching, research, and scholarship, we’re deeply grateful. It is a great privilege to be able to share this
moment with all of you. This is a moment for celebration. This is a moment grounded in all of your hard work leading up to today and the experiences that brought you here in your decision to
seek an advanced degree and the journey of
exploration that you’ve taken throughout your time here at Georgetown, expanding your minds and your hearts to be able to meet the needs of our world. You joined our community at an extraordinary time in history, a moment of extraordinary
global connection, of potential and possibility, a moment in which we are
faced with urgent challenges, ranging from poverty and healthcare to health and social
mobility to education, all of which demand our
most serious attention. 75 years ago, President Franklin Roosevelt offered a landmark State
of the Union address, an address now known as
the Four Freedoms Address, in which he described a world founded upon four essential human freedoms, freedom of religion, freedom
of speech and expression, freedom from want, freedom from fear, his principles that shaped the founding of the United Nations and our understanding of human
rights in a global context, words that now mark his
memorial here in Washington. In his reflections, so prescient and so relevant
to us today, he says, “The basic things expected by our people “of their political and
economic systems are simple. “They are equality of opportunity
for youth and for others, “jobs for those who can work, “security for those who need it, “the ending of special
privilege for the few, “the preservation of
civil liberties for all, “the enjoyment of the fruits
of scientific progress, “and a wider and constantly
rising standard of living. “These are the simple, basic things “that must never be lost sight of “in the turmoil and
unbelievable complexity “of our modern world.” Close quote. These words, written 75 years ago, speak to the promise of the
humanities and the sciences and the social sciences, the work that each of you will pursue to respond to the challenges of our time to build a more just and fair society. His words are both a call and a guide and an expression of our values and an aspiration for all of us. And they’re a reminder that
you undertake this work even as our world becomes more complex, more global, more interconnected. There is a role for each of you, a role that you are now prepared to play, a role that you are meant to play, a role that our world needs you to play. Today, we celebrate a
significant moment in your lives. We celebrate the journey
you’ve made to get to this day and the journey on which
you’re about to embark. This is an extraordinary time. This is your time. And we are grateful for the scholarship that you have pursued, the service that you have contributed, the ways in which you have
enlivened our community with your passion and with your talents. We could not be more honored
to share this moment with you. Congratulations on this very special day. (audience applauds) – Graduates, today you
have joined a community of women and men of Georgetown University whose blue and gray colors
adorn your hoods and gowns. The colors of Georgetown University adopted in the aftermath of the Civil War symbolize the commitment of
our community then and now to healing, reconciliation,
inclusion, and hope. These colors figure
prominently in our alma mater, which I now ask you to join us in singing. Please rise. The alma mater is located in the back of the
commencement program book. (“Georgetown University Alma Mater”) ♫ Hail, oh Georgetown, Alma Mater ♫ Swift Potomac’s lovely daughter ♫ Ever watching by the water ♫ Smiles on us today ♫ Now her children gather ’round her ♫ Lo, with garlands they have crowned her ♫ Reverent hands and fond enwound her ♫ With the Blue and Gray ♫ Wave her colors ever ♫ Furl her standards never ♫ But raise it high ♫ And proudly cry ♫ May Georgetown live forever ♫ Where Potomac’s tide is streaming ♫ From her spires and steeples beaming ♫ See the grand old banner gleaming ♫ Georgetown’s Blue and Gray (audience applauds) Please remain standing. Reverend Ronald Murphy
of the Society of Jesus will now offer the benediction. – Benediction, as you know, is a blessing. But you are already blessed, and I know from the happiness on the faces
of the doctors newly minted that it’s a deep happiness. But a far greater person than me once came to a hilltop and said who were the people who
were really blessed. So let me have the blessing come from Him. “When He saw the crowds, “He went up onto the
hilltop, and He sat down. “His students came to Him, “and He began to teach them, saying, “‘What a blessing you are
when you are not arrogant “‘but learning to be humble,
to be poor in spirit, “‘for yours is the Kingdom of Heaven. “‘How blessed are you when
you love people so much “‘that you mourn when they die? “‘You will be comforted. “‘Blessed are you when your study “‘brings you to meekness
and to gentleness, “‘for you will inherit the land. “‘Blessed are you when
you hunger and thirst “‘to be righteous, for
you will be satisfied. “‘What a blessing you are
when you are merciful, “‘for you will be shown mercy. “‘You are a blessing
when you avoid duplicity “‘and instead learn to be clean of heart, “‘for you will see God. “‘Realize how blessed are you “‘who are studying to be peacemakers, “‘for you will be called
the children of God. “‘And blessed are you even
when you are persecuted “‘for striving to be good
and to act with fairness, “‘for yours is the Kingdom of Heaven.'” And now, let us pray for these blessings. Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love, where there is injury, pardon, and where there is doubt, faith, where is there despair, hope, where there is darkness, light, and where there is sadness, joy. Oh, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to
be consoled as to console, to be understood as to understand, to be loved as to love, for it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned, and it is in dying that we
are born to eternal life. And may the blessing
of the Lord be upon you with His grace and His loving kindness now and always and forever and ever. And let us say, “Amen.” – We ask that our guests please remain standing at their places until the faculty and the
graduates have recessed. Doctoral graduates, you will follow the faculty
in exiting Healy Lawn. Graduates of programs associated with the
School of Foreign Service, you remain in your seats, as your diploma distribution ceremony will take place in this location. Graduates of the programs
in the biomedical sciences, you will be led by marshals to your diploma distribution ceremony in the Leavey Center to your right. Graduates of the programs
in the arts and sciences, you will be led by marshals to your diploma distribution ceremony in the Leo J. O’Donovan Hall
via Library Walk to your left. After all the master
graduates have recessed, family and friends are
invited to follow them to attend the diploma
distribution ceremonies. Marshals will be available to direct you to the proper location. Maps are also available
in the information tent near the front gates. The 2016 Georgetown University Graduate School Commencement Ceremony is now officially ended. (audience applauds) (cheerful orchestral music) (cheerful orchestral music)