Fast Forward: Los Rios Colleges Convocation – Fall 2016

Fast Forward: Los Rios Colleges Convocation – Fall 2016

September 9, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[ Music ]>>All right, folks! We’re going to get
started this afternoon. So, let me start
with, good afternoon!>>[Crowd] Good afternoon!>>Let me tell you,
it is just terrific to see you all here
this afternoon. The energy across the
whole campus is just raised about ten notches. So, we’re going to begin today’s
Fall 2016 Folsom Lake College Convocation with greetings
from our board of trustees. And so, it is going to
be my honor to bring to the podium John Knight, a member of the Los Rios
Community College Board of Trustees. Many of you know John. But if you don’t, he’s a
long time public servant and community advocate
and he served on the Eldorado County
Board of Supervisors, on the Eldorado County Fire
Board, and he is also a member of our very own Folsom
Lake College Foundation. Both of his children went to Oak Creek High
School, and – Oak Ridge. Sorry! [Laughter] It’s
a different high school. Oak Ridge High School,
sorry about that. And attended Los Rios College. So, please give a
warm Falcon welcome, notice he’s got the teal
tie, to John Knight. [ Applause ]>>It’s, Rachel got ahold of my
wife and told her what I needed to wear, and how
I needed to dress. But, thank you, President
Rosenthal, and it’s always good to be here to welcome you all to the 2016 Fall
Semester Convocation. And it’s always my
pleasure to, you know, welcome you on behalf
of the entire board. And, initially, we were going
to have Kay Albiani join me, but she wasn’t feeling
all that well. But, for those of the,
that you don’t know Kay, she will be retiring at
the end of this year. And she has spent 20 years
as a Los Rios trustee, and prior to that,
she spent 18 years on the Elk Grove
School District Board. So, she had about 38
years, you know, experience. So, we’ll miss her tremendously. But, with that 20
years, I think, just about every building
here, when you see that plaque that you go in, her name
is going to be on that. So, she had a lot to
do with, you know, as this campus developed. But, we will certainly miss her. And she was all, she was
a governor’s appointee on the trustee group. She was also part of the
school board association, so she was actively involved
for many, many years. As a trustee, it’s a point
of pride to be invited in this celebration, because
this is a beautiful campus, beautiful college. And, actually, I
took a class here when there was still
portables here. So, you know, it
goes back that far. But the convocation is
always a day of hope and great expectations
for the coming year. For those of you who are
new to Folsom Lake College, congratulations and welcome. I hope you become one of
those true Falcon life that you want to live. But, school years come
and go, but our commitment to our students never fades. It never wavers. So, thank you for all
of your hard work, action and perseverance. And, when I, you know, see all
the work that you do, you know, reminds me of a comment
from William Ward, that mediocre teachers tell,
the good teachers explain, the superior teacher
demonstrates, the great teacher inspires. And, Rachel’s always talked about the inspiration
that you have. And I think all of
you, you know, have that great teacher
mentality. And so, you will continue
to inspire everybody. And now, please join me in
welcoming our Chancellor, Brian King, to present
his portion of the Fall 2016 Convocation.>>Thank you, John! [ Applause ]>>Good afternoon!>>[Crowd] Good Afternoon!>>It is wonderful
to be with you today, and I want to acknowledge
the members of our District Office
Leadership Team, who get to hear this
for the fourth time. As some of you know, we
start the day at CRC, then we go to Sac
City, American River, and then we saved
the best for last. [Applause] So, here we are. And let me acknowledge
Jamie Nye, Associate Vice Chancellor
[Applause], our General Counsel, J. P. Sherry [Applause],
Associate Vice Chancellor, Mitchell Benson [Applause],
and I saved Sue for last, because I know she gets
such a good welcome. Too long… [ Applause and cheers ] And I want to invite
my wife, Christina, to come here for a second. Come here, Christina.>>Yay! [ Applause ]>>Hey.>>It is amazing to think that this is my fourth fall
convocation in Los Rios. It’s hard to believe that
we’ve been here that long. And, just to get a sense
of how quickly time passes, our daughter, Celia, was a
freshman when we moved here.>>That’s right.>>She was sure we
were ruining her life, and now she’s a senior. Just about a mile away. So, she’s finishing
her senior year. So, thank you for helping our
family make this transition so smoothly. Thanks for all you do!>>Me too!>>And, Celia is at school,
at least her phone is. I looked on Find My iPhone, so. [Laughter] This technology. I have been looking forward
to today for more than a year, because last year at this time,
you’ll recall, we were talking about getting through the
accreditation process, reaccrediting our colleges, and then developing
a strategic plan. So, a lot of energy coming into
today to put together that plan, and pivot to the future. And, on May 11th, Trustee Knight and the other trustees
approved our new strategic plan. And that’s really remarkable. But, we went through the
accreditation process in the fall, didn’t miss a
beat in January and started on the strategic plan. And with hundreds of men and
women from all four colleges across the district,
we were able to successfully complete
our next strategic plan. So, give yourselves
a round of applause. [ Applause ] Last year at this time, we were
getting ready for the visits from our site teams
for our accreditation. How many of you were
involved in accreditation in one way or another? Raise your hand. That’s pretty much everybody. Let’s celebrate for a second! All four of our colleges
were fully accredited! [ Applause ] And, we’re not just involved
in our own accreditation, our district is very involved
in leadership efforts statewide to improve the accreditation
process. And if you have an
interest in that, if you go to the
Community College League of California website, there
is a lot of information about efforts to
improve accreditation. And I do regular
updates on behalf of the CEO board for the state. So, we will, after convocation,
do what we do each year. We’ll send you an
email that has links to the different
topics we discuss. So, you’ll have a
chance to dive in deeper if your schedule allows. So, we use the recommendations
and commendations from accreditation to inform
our strategic planning process. And, two things were
consistent in all the groups that were involved in
planning the strategic plan. One, no surprise,
accountability. An understanding that
there’s a greater pressure to be accountable
both to our students, and also to our community. And that, at Folsom Lake and
Los Rios, there’s an embracing of that accountability. There’s an understanding that accountability is
increasingly important. And not just to say we’re
accountable, but to measure it and have standards
so that we can see that we’re doing the things
that we need to be doing. Another consistent theme
with every group involved in strategic planning,
and the question was, are we in a business-as-usual
mode or do we really need to be pushing the edge? And you won’t be surprised
to know, every group said, this is not status quo. That we’ve gone through
many changes in the last several years,
and more changes are coming. So, we have to be
willing to push the edge and do things differently. Couple of statistics,
underline how important it is to be responsive and
be open to change. Our students are changing. You see that. You see in the classrooms
and everywhere we go across our colleges, that
our students are changing. And right now, 60 percent
of our students come from historically
underrepresented groups. So, we have a very diverse,
dynamic student body. And, as an example, Latino
enrollment district-wide in 2011, we were
under 20 percent. By fall of last year, we
were up to 25 percent. So, you see, in a
fairly short time, the makeup of our
students is changing and the needs are changing, too. And we’re responding to
those needs through our plan. It’s exciting to be a
part of higher education that looks most like
the community. Our sector, community
colleges, we look more like the community we serve than any other part
of higher education. Isn’t that exciting? [ Applause ] Our students look
like our community. So, we were fully
accredited in January and started the strategic
planning process. We made that pivot to
developing a new strategic plan. And we provided with
you the five goals. You have a single-page handout. If it’s okay, I thought I would
read all five of those slowly. Would that be? I’m just kidding [Laughter]. In the time we have together
today, we’re going to focus on, really the backbone
goal of the five. The first goal, Establish
Effective Pathways that Optimize Student’s
Success and Access. So, goal number one
is emphasizing that helping our students do
better and providing access to more students are
not competing goals, they really are the same goal
that we know that our challenges in recent years involving
enrollment have been significant. And we shared with you, we’ve
always been very transparent about enrollment, and on July
15th, we shared with you that, for the first time in
our district’s history, we have done into stability. And it’s been headline news. You may have seen an
article in early August in the Sacramento Bee. I want to share with
you what we view as the headlines
involving enrollment. We need to reach more
students who need us. That is at the heart of access
that we know there are men and women and boys and
girls in our region who need exactly
what we’re providing. So, we need to find
those students. And last year to this year, we’re down about 4 percent
compared to last fall. So, we need to continue asking
why that is and what we can do to help find more students
find their way to our colleges. Stability funding I mentioned,
is a new term at Los Rios. It’s not that new for many
colleges, but stability means when the state has agreed to
fund us at a certain level based on the students we
serve, if you do not meet that enrollment target, you’re
held harmless for one year. So, your funding is not reduced. That’s what stability
funding means. And that’s where
we are for 2015-16, the year just completed. I don’t know if it makes
you feel better or worse, but we’re certainly not alone in enrollment challenges
around the state. Half of the districts in the
state of California either are in stability, as we
are, for last year. Or in restoration, which is
the year after stability, where you have some time to regrow enrollment
and increase access. From a financial standpoint,
we’re losing millions of dollars that would help us serve more
students by not connecting with the students who need us. So, last year, we’re
held harmless, so our funding isn’t reduced. But if we had served
more students, we would have had more dollars
to benefit our students. So, all of these
efforts ultimately focus around serving our students
better and having more resources to serve our students better. And I think you all
know, this is not new. We’ve been aware that enrollment
was changing around the state for the last few years. So, we’ve been very active in
getting our leadership together. And we had a special
cabinet meeting on August 1st, earlier
this month. And cabinet at Los Rios
involves leaders from all four of our colleges and the
district office and all of our constituent groups. We had a very robust discussion
about what we’ve done so far and what we need to do differently
together moving forward. And the theme was
pretty straightforward. It’s not the time to panic. We want to be calm, but
we want to be thoughtful. And this is not just
a faculty issue or just a student
services issue. All of us need to be looking
at what we need to be looking at what we can do together to address the enrollment
challenges. So, we need everybody. So, we have the cabinet meeting
and our board, Trustee Knight and the other board
members in July, spent really the entire board
meeting exploring what we have done so far, the many
initiatives already in place, and what we’re going to do
differently moving forward, to provide more access. We’ll continue to market our
classes and our programs. And we’re going to
explore new tools that will provide resources to
do things differently and a lot of examples come to mind, but
the one I’m going to share with you today is the
institutional effectiveness partnership initiative, IEPI. And we’re the first
multi-college district in the state that filed a joint
application for these resources. We’ll get $750,000
dollars, $150,000 for each of the colleges in the
district, for a unified effort on enrollment management. And the money’s good. It’s always nice
to have that money. But, in addition, the IEPI
program provides teams of peers from other colleges
who serve, and come and get a fresh perspective
on what we’re doing in terms of enrollment management. And an example that
comes to mind for me, any of you coach your own kid? Any of you ever had
that experience? A couple of years ago when
my son was in 8th grade, I coached his undefeated
10 and 0. Doesn’t have anything
to do with the story, but I like saying
that [laughter]. This 10 and 0 basketball team,
and the best thing for me to give direction to my son,
is to have someone else say it, because my voice is familiar. And I think the IEPI
process is like that. It’s not that we don’t have
great insights and great voices within our colleges, but when
we can have a different voice than someone from the
outside, in some cases, say the same thing, it is
a good opportunity for us. And IEPI and the efforts that
we are going to implement in the coming months, are
all about our students and helping our students
be successful. So, at first glance, it
might seem like the news about enrollment and
the strategic plan, are that enrollment discussions
could be a distraction from the strategic plan. But it really is
the same discussion, back to that first
goal of our plan; Establishing Effective Pathways
both for Student Success and for Student Access. It’s not an either-or. It is a both-and. And in terms of pathways,
the focus on pathways, the concept is easy
to understand, that if a process
is complicated, and sometimes convoluted, having a straight path
makes a lot of sense, right? Are you with me on that? What does it mean in
community colleges? How many of you have read “Redesigning America’s
Community Colleges”? It’s a book that’s received a
lot of attention nationwide, because the concept summarized
very well by the president of Valencia College, my friend,
Sandy Shugart, Sandy said, “We must move from a culture
of chaos to one of clear design and support with
more limited choices and more secure outcomes
for students”. Doesn’t say no choices,
but more limited choices, to secure their outcome. So, who would like
a copy of this book? Who would be interested
in having a copy? Now, a lot of times, I give it
to somebody on the front row, so let’s go to the top. And while I’m working my way up, we’re going to go all
the way to the top. Will you raise your right hand? [Laughter] Say, “I
promise to read the book.”>>I promise to read the book.>>And I agree to participate
in an online discussion about the book this semester.>>It’s too many words.>>Just say, “I do.”>>Yes, I do. [Laughter]>>Okay.>>Thank you.>>Thank you. [ Applause ] That’s cool, she got
a free book, right?>>Yeah.>>But it’s not cool
you didn’t get one. So here’s the deal. If you want a copy,
we have 150 copies. And this is the fourth
group we’ve spoke to. So, about 100 have been
claimed, if not more. So, don’t do it right now, listen for a couple
more minutes [laughter]. But as soon as we wrap up, and
after Rachel is completed too, don’t be emailing me
while Rachel is speaking. But send me an email that
you’d like a copy of the book and you agree to participate
in the conversation. So, my email’s pretty
easy to remember. I’m not the queen bee. It’s [email protected] So, send me an email. We’ll get you a copy
of the book. Three specific thoughts about
pathways, preparing students, guiding students, then
redesigning programs. So, preparing, guiding,
redesigning. For preparing, we
can’t do this alone. That, if we’re not
communicating very closely with our K-12 districts, and
also with our four-year college and university partners,
we’re not going to have students be successful. So, one of the best ways to have
greater success in college is to have students that come
to us ready to succeed. And it’s no one’s fault that
so many times the ecosystem of education is not
aligned well, where we’re a large,
metropolitan region. One school district
may be doing one thing, and another may be
doing another. And even within our district, sometimes a great program will
be happening at one college, and it’s hard to get that infrastructure
to share good ideas. So, when you think about what’s
going on in the Olympics, being in the boat together
and rowing and being in alignment makes
all the difference. If you want to head in the right
direction, and for the crew, if you want to get
there more quickly, you have to be coordinated
and aligned. And money doesn’t hurt. I’m very excited to share with
you that we learned this summer that our region has one of
only five grants statewide for the basic skills
pilot partnership. And we’re partnering
with Sierra College. So this goes across
college district boundaries, we’re partnering
with school districts in both Sacramento County
and Placer Counties, that we’re cutting
across county boundaries. And also partnering with
Sac State University. So, it’s a great example
of this regional approach. And having everyone together
to make sure we’re rowing in the right direction together. Out of that $2 million, for Los
Rios, about $400,000 will go to professional development,
which will give us a chance to get faculty from
our colleges together with high school faculty and
faculty from Sacramento State to make sure we’re in alignment
for basic skills and math, and I think that framework
will serve us very well for other topics, as well. Aligned Capital Region is a
brand new regional organization. How many of you have heard
of Aligned Capital Region? Maybe, maybe a few have. Our district is involved
in the leadership of this new backbone
organization. And that $2 million
dollar grant is an example of how we will use this
new regional organization that will bring together people
from all the organizations. And the cool thing is,
we’ll have people involved in Aligned Capital Region
who are not direct recipients of the grant, but
will be interested in the learning that does on. So, we want to change
the whole culture. So, we’re not competing
against each other for grants. Anytime anybody gets a
grant in their region, it’s a learning opportunity
for everyone. And another focus for preparing
students is Promise Programs, and I don’t need to tell you
about Promise Programs, do I? The Folsom Lake has
been successful in developing a Promise Program. And on August 30th, Los Rios is
going to have the largest number of people from any
district in the state of California attending a
Promise Conference in Oakland. So, we are moving
really aggressively to expand our capital
region Promise Programs and Rancho Cordova was
the first city to step up with $100,000 dollars. That’s worth a round of
applause for the city of Rancho Cordova [applause]. The Folsom Lake College
Promise Program, West Sacramento Mayor
Christopher Cabaldon, has proposed $500,000 dollars
on an initiative in November that would help a
Promise Program that would involve
Sacramento City College. The newly-elected mayor of
Sacramento, Darrell Steinberg, is very interested in
the Promise concepts. So, I have no doubt that ARC,
CRC and Sac City will be engaged in a Promise with the
city of Sacramento. The county is interested. And businesses. We’re being very aggressive in
talking to our business partners about the need to support
the promise efforts. So, the money is great. Having scholarship money for
a Promise Program is great. But the alignment is
at least as important. And in some ways, scholarships
make people interested in the Promise Program. That’s good, but when you have
everyone together, it’s a chance to talk about how to
improve alignment. So, preparing students,
first part of pathways. Guiding students once
students are coming our way. And one of the things
we can do is streamline and simplify processes
from the first contact to the first day of class. How many of you have
applied for a class in our district or our college? How many of you found it easy? It’s not easy. It, there are things we
can do to make it better. And underlining why. Looking at our students again, almost half of our
students are the first in their family to
go to college. So, even if we can navigate
the process, we need to think about it from the
eyes of someone who may not have the
experience of applying before. So, making those
processes more streamlined. And, last year, more than
6,000 students, 6,500 students, attended more than
one of our colleges. So, making the process to go
from college to college easier, will become increasingly
important. So, I think about how
these things happen. How many of you have a
garage that’s not as clean as you’d like for it to be? [Laughter] So, a lot of
garages look like that. And if you look in that picture, there’s some cool
stuff in there. You know, you get something,
you put it in the garage. And, how many of you have
gone to Costco and — Christina will chuckle at this. I went for a gallon
of milk once. And I came back with an
ocean kayak [laughter]. Anybody else have
that experience? You go for one thing, and
you put it in the garage. And there’s nothing
wrong with what’s there, but it becomes cluttered
at some point. Anyone’s garage look like this?>>Oh, wow [laughter
and chattering].>>That’s a face.>>I don’t, that’s
not my garage. I want to let you know. But the thought is, making
things easier to find, and in the intake process
to the first day of class, cleaning up things
that are good. They’ve grown over time. But making it work
better for our students. The second area in guiding
students involves high school students, and convincing
more high school students. And it’s not just
the students, right? It’s also parents and
counselors, that attending one of our colleges is
a smart choice. Here is a blog from
a high school student about smart choices. And Madison Sikes is the
student, and she is going to enroll at Folsom Lake. And I am really happy to
say she’s with us today. Will you stand and say hello? [ Applause ] And her mother, Terri. So, Madison, thank you for
letting me share your story, which she posted on her blog. The theme is one that
you probably recognize from other high school students. She had opportunities to go to
many colleges and universities. She did very well
in high school. But it was a smart choice for
Madison and her family to go to Folsom Lake College. So, she’s proud to
announce that she’s going to attend Folsom Lake
College in the fall. What do you think was the
response from her peer group and from parents,
teachers and counselors? Really? You’re too
smart for that. Don’t waste your time on that. Let’s say “boo!”>>[Crowd] Boo!>>It’s wrong, but we know it’s
a perception that’s out there. And I love what Madison said
about, “I’m not too smart for my choice, I’m smart
because of my choice.” [Applause] Stand
up again, Madison. It is a smart choice, right? And we’re going to show
Madison and her mom and her friends how
smart a choice it is. And I look forward to all
of you reaching out to her when you see her, and help
her continue her path. So, the third part of Pathways
is redesigning programs. And faculty, I’m taking to you. When we talk about
redesigning programs, you are at the heart
of the programs. And we have great programs. But we need to look at our
programs differently sometimes. Many times, we’re looking
more at individual courses. And the need is to look
at complete programs. So, the gold standard would
be guiding student choices without restricting options. So, we want students
to have options. It’s not one path for
everyone, but they need guidance in getting on a path and
staying on that path. And the good news
is, we have examples of wonderful successes
in Pathways already. So, Pathways is not some
new gimmick or new program. Pathways is a way of structuring
the work we already do. One example is our associate
degree for transfers. Students come to us
and then are able to go directly to
CSU with the ADT. And our career technical
education programs are great examples of pathways, and a
very clearly defined program that students can complete
within a certain amount of time, if they stay on track. So, thinking about how we
can implement pathways going from that big concept of
the road through the maze to very specific
things we can do, one example would be encouraging
every student who is able, to take one more class. If every student enrolled, who
is able, took one more class that would be transformative for Folsom Lake, and
for our district. How many of you saw
the women’s 400 meters?>>Yeah [applause].>>She really wanted to
get to the finish line, didn’t she [laughter]? So, when you’re committed to
getting to the finish line, you’re able to do more than you
possibly thought you could do. And also educate us all about
what it means to finish a race. For our students, this
is the finish line. Graduation, for students who want a degree,
is the finish line. So, helping them get to the
finish line is more important in their lives, in many ways,
than winning a gold medal. And this slide has a
lot of information, so I’ll try to summarize. The point is that, when every
year you spend in college, after the prescribed
time, means that you will. Just, you’ve got
your hand in the air. I feel like I need to
see what you want to say.>>It’s a nice thing. It’s a nice thing. You know Allison Felix?>>Um hum.>>She is the niece of
one of our faculty, well, now retired faculty, from CRC!>>Okay. [Applause] So,
there’s a connection! [Applause].>>Melvena Jones.>>Okay, awesome.>>Whoo!>>Now, I don’t know
if that really, can you say that one more
time so everybody can hear?>>Yes, Melvena Jones.>>Melvena Jones.>>And dean actually, she
was dean and then ascended to faculty [laughter
and applause].>>She was a dean and
ascended to faculty.>>And, and, that is her niece.>>Allison Felix, on the right.>>Allison Felix,
called Shuggy for us. Who played with my daughter.>>Aw.>>Well, there you go. I did not know that. [Applause] So, thank you
for sharing [Applause]. So, a connection. Now, I thought you were going to say you couldn’t
read this slide, and there was nothing
I could do about that. There is a lot of
information, and the point is, that every year that you’re
in college beyond the time that you hope to be
is very expensive in terms of time and money. The direct cost, we know. And for community colleges,
our fees are not high. But still, there are
costs for books, classes. You’re living expenses. The opportunity cost is
what really racks up. So, every year that you
don’t have that degree over your lifetime, adds
up to a really big number. And for our students, we have to
pay a lot of attention to that. Because we know about 43 percent of our students either
are low income or poverty. So, when we talk about the
lifetime cost of an extra year in college, that’s
a really big number. $147,000 dollars for every
year, every extra year, that you’re in college
with the direct costs and the opportunity costs. We want to be about opportunity,
not opportunity costs. And you have my email,
so, before you fire me that email saying it’s
not all about the money, I want to tell you, I
absolutely, emphatically, agree that it’s not
about degrees. It’s not all about the money. It’s also about having
a fulfilling career, it’s about having
a meaningful life and being a participating
citizen in our democracy. But you’re not going to be
any of that without what?>>Education.>>A job. So, it’s
not either-or again. And we want students to be
well-rounded, but we want them to have a good economic future. So, in a pathway, having
students full-time. What is a full-time student? How many units a semester
for federal financial aid? Twelve for federal
financial aid. That’s not on time to graduate. I’m not great at math. But if I’m taking 12 units
for the two semesters a year, how many am I going to
complete in two years?>>Forty-eight.>>Forty-eight. Not sixty. So, 12 really is not full-time
in terms of completion. You look at national
community college numbers, about 30 percent of community
college students complete 24 units in 2015-16. So, about 3 out of 10. That’s nationwide. What do you think the Los
Rios percentage of students is who completed 24
units in 2015-16? Are we better than the
national average, or lower?>>Lower.>>Twelve percent. So, we’re substantially lower. We have room to improve
the percentage of students completing 12 units
a semester, and 24 units a year. So, one more class. We have a significant number
of students who could be at 24 if they took one more
class a semester. And the ultimate goal for
students who want to complete in two years would
be 30 units a year. So, 30 units a year. And again, looking at
the national numbers, only about 27 percent of all college students
are taking 30 units a year. You look at community colleges
nationally, about 11 percent of community college students
are completing 30 units in 2015-16. How do you think we did? Are we better or worse? Unfortunately, only
about 4 percent of our students completed
30 units. So, I would stipulate that 100
percent of our students are not in a position to
take 30 units a year, but I think you’d be
hard pressed to come up with an argument we couldn’t
increase pretty substantially. And it would benefit
our students, too. One of the concerns with students taking
any more classes is that they may not succeed. But there’s a growing,
overwhelming body of research that the vast majority
of students do better when they’re taking
more classes. So, we have to find
that right mix. So, one more class. More students on time. Dual enrollment and advanced
ed are other opportunities with high school students. And then next year,
we’re going to build that dual enrollment
program here at Folsom Lake, and throughout the district. So, more high school students
can be taking classes while they’re in college. And we need to do education
about AP versus dual enrollment. That Advanced Placement,
there are, is the perception may
times, that AP is wonderful. But, as you know, dual enrollment courses
automatically advance where AP may or may not. So, all three of those areas are
things that we can do together. So, in guiding students choices,
redesigning our programs. We’ve talked about the
associate degrees for transfers. We’ve talked about career
technical education. And really good news this year,
we have $5 million dollars in addition as a
district to expand some of our continuing career
technical education programs. And I want to close with a
number that is more positive. It’s very positive. Some of these numbers
give us cause for concern. Hopefully our catalyst reaction. But, associate degree for
transfers are a huge success. What percentage of our transfer
students do you think finish in two years without an
associate degree for transfer? So, a student has
completed a degree, and they transfer,
but it’s not an ADT. The success rate
is about 50 percent over two years, which
is not bad. But with an ADT, 85 percent of our ADT transfers
are not just completing. They’re completing
within two years. So, it is just powerful
evidence we know how to do this. We know how to build pathways
that work for students. And when the pathway is there, it leads to on-time
completion for our student. So, pathways are not something
we don’t know how to do. We just need to do more
of it, and do it better. Eighty-five percent. How about a round of
applause for 85 percent? [ Applause ] Now, I know that,
in my presentation, sometimes it sounds like
a lot of statistics, that can be overwhelming. And all these big
ideas take time to do. And you’re ready to be
through with convocation and start preparing
for classes Monday. I get that. I spent a lot of time
in the classroom. And you do make a difference in the work you do
in the classroom. But I want to close
with the story about how one person really
can make a difference, and things that may seem small
can have a tremendous impact. Recognize this? Have you seen those? What is it?>>Parking slip.>>Parking slip. So, it costs $2 dollars
to get one of these. On August 5th, a woman, a student at Sac City,
posted this story. And I want to close with this. And hope I can get through it
without getting too emotional, because it moves
me to share this. I’ll read what she posted
on the site Love Matters. We’ll share this link
with you, as well. And you can go and post
comments on this site. Here’s what she wrote. “I tried to go to college
once when my daughter was two. I was told by my ex
I couldn’t do it, and I would be neglecting
my daughter. So, I gave up. Now, my daughter is five,
and I went to college to do my assessment testing
(that was just this month, on August 5th, as the
parking slip says). The whole way there, I
kept hearing his voice. I kept hearing his voice in my head telling me
those things again. I got to the parking lot, and I found out they only
take cash for the permit. His voice got to me, and
this older lady just knew it. She walked over and started
talking to me, (think about that as you pull into the
parking lot on Monday with our students here). She went out of her way to
get me to the testing room. (So, she went that extra mile. She bought the parking pass, then helped her to
the assessment). Here’s what the student says. It was the best thing in the
world she could have done. A complete stranger saved
me from giving up again.” And she writes, “I will always
hold on to this parking permit to remind me that a complete
stranger had faith in me and that I can do this. That a past voice will not
control my life anymore.” [ Applause ] That’s why we’re here. So, I appreciate you letting me
spend some time with you today. Think about that on Monday, how the little things can
make all the difference. Thank you. [ Applause and music ]