Duke University Department of Economics Graduation 2018

Duke University Department of Economics Graduation 2018

October 20, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


[Connel Fullenkamp] Good morning, ladies and
gentlemen. Thank you so much for coming this morning. My name is Connel Fullenkamp. I’m the Director of Undergraduate Studies
in the Economics Department. I just want to make a quick announcement that
our ceremony is going to begin very shortly so I’d kindly ask the graduates to take their
places on the main floor. There are also a few open seats on the main
floor, please, so feel free to pack in around in the back here and on the sides. It’s a little bit cozy because of the construction
in Cameron so we appreciate everybody’s efforts to get cozy and get to know your neighbor
a little bit and we should begin in about five minutes or so. Thank you very much. [Craig Burnside] Good morning everyone. Is it hot enough for you this morning? Welcome to the Duke Economics Graduation Ceremony
for 2018. I’m Craig Burnside, the Chair of the Department. On behalf of our faculty and staff, it’s my
pleasure to welcome all our graduating students, parents, family members and friends to this
celebration. We’re grateful that many of you have traveled
a great distance to be here from around the country and around the world. We also welcome those of you who are joining
us online. As is often the case, our graduation ceremony
this year coincides with Mother’s Day so I’d like to give special greetings to all the
mothers that are here with us today. Last year, I stood here and expressed a lot
of optimism despite the seeming lack of positivity in our public discourse. Oh my, what a year it has been since then. Nonetheless, seeing all our graduates today,
my optimism is intact and I just like to say a few things about what you can do to try
and keep it that way. After the celebrations are over, go forth
and be positive. Be kind. Be respectful of a diversity of opinion but
also, be smart in the pursuit of truth because while all ideas deserve a chance, objectively
not all of them stand up to rigorous consideration. As you’ve all learned at some point, of course,
not all hypotheses can pass the test of statistical significance at the 5% level. Just like last year, my last piece of advice
to you all is to be good economists, our reputation after all depends on that. Before we begin the degree ceremony I would
like to introduce our honorary faculty speaker, Frank Sloan. A native of Greensboro, North Carolina, Frank’s
distinguished career in economics spans nearly 60 years with an AB from Oberlin, a PhD from
Harvard and affiliations with the RAND Corporation, UCLA, the University of Florida, Vanderbilt
and Duke where since 1993, he has been the J. Alexander McMahon Professor of Health Policy
and Management and Professor of Economics. Frank is an international leader in the field
of health economics. His honors and accomplishments are too many
to list but I’ll try to give you a sense of scale. Our department recently went through a process
of external review and as part of that process. I had to ask each faculty member to give me
a short version of their CV, something that was limited to their publications, who they
had supervised and their major honors. Just to give you a sense of scale, mine just
managed to eke over four pages long. Frank sent me a tome and broke my inbox. His is 47 pages long. Now Frank fully intends to be active in research
indefinitely but this year marks Frank’s retirement from Duke so there is no one more appropriate
to offer words of wisdom to our graduates this year. With that, I’ll hand it over to Frank. [Frank Sloan] Thank you, Craig, for inviting
me to speak. Today marks an important transition from studenthood
to alumnus or alumni status. As alumni, you are Duke’s most permanent fixture. Faculty and university presidents come and
go, trustees’ terms end. As a young alumni you may not have the financial
resources to make major donations but nevertheless, you can help shape Duke’s future direction. The thrust of these remarks is that I argue
that you can affect collective decisions at Duke and in the larger world. One may say that individuals alone cannot
affect public policy but we as individuals can make others’ lives better. Economists study how people respond to incentives
and that could be called extrinsic motivation but I’m going to talk about intrinsic motivation
in this talk. Intrinsic motivation guides us to do what
is right without receiving an external reward. The intrinsic motivation is why we care about
the feelings and experiences of others and can be motivated to act on them. For example, why last fall some students reacted
to the revelation of the lease statute and at other times it made demands on Duke which
I applaud in principle even though I don’t necessarily agree with each individual demand. On the Lee matter following events in Charlottesville
controversy game to Duke, a statue of Robert E. Lee at Duke’s Chapel entrance was defaced
and quickly removed. As a Native North Carolinian, I was not at
all surprised that Lee statute adorned the entrance for 85 years. The confederate general was venerated from
the time the chapel was built through the mid-20th century and for some people quite
a bit longer. Why bring this up now? It is part of Duke’s history and by extension,
yours as a Duke alum. We need to be informed and not surprised. Also, what happens when you change from student
to alumni status? Often we, and probably me too, become more
conservative and maybe less concerned about these issues but I’m arguing that we should
keep involved. While respected regionally, Duke was not always
a national and international leader, and it wasn’t always as diverse as now. Increased diversity is a reason for Duke’s
growth and admission process that select students based on skin color or ethnicity inevitably
excludes contributors to the institution’s excellence. Moreover, such discrimination promotes a perception
that our way is the best way. We become oblivious to other perspectives
and ways of doing things. An interchange between a perspective student
and Duke President Hollis Edens, and you’ll know him from the dorm, I guess among other
things, illustrates how far we have come while admitting that we have far to go. I will read two short letters that I got from
our library. On May 26th 1950 Virgil Stroud of my hometown,
the Greensboro, wrote to President Edens. “Dear Sir, this is to inquire of the possibility
of attending Duke University as a graduate student in the field of public law and government. I a Negro, a veteran, and would desire to
attend as a day student. Further, I’m employed at A&T College and with
a family I find it increasingly difficult to get too far away from home. Hence, it would be a decided advantage to
get training in this state. I understand the conditions involved and the
case may not be appropriate. I would expect a frank and direct reply from
you. Yours very truly, Virgil Stroud.” Four days later President Edens replied. “Replying to your …” Dear Mr. Stroud, which
was even unusual at the time to even refer to an African American as Mister, but he did. “Replying to your letter of May 26, you perhaps
are familiar with the past history of Duke University and the policy concerning requests
similar to yours. There has been no change in policy. I would suggest you confer with the North
Carolina College at Durham concerning opportunities for the study of public law and government
at that institution. As you know, that college has a law school
which has been recently accredited. Hoping that you are able to work on your,”
and I underline your problem, “through the means suggested above or through some others
means. Sincerely yours, Hollis Edens.” President Edens was probably concerned about
reactions from trustees, alumni, and donors and the indifference of students and faculty
if he had taken the lead and encouraged Mr. Stroud to apply to Duke. While we might be upset at Edens’s response,
university presidents do serve limited terms and they serve multiple constituencies. It is difficult for a university leader to
get far ahead of the constituencies. You belong to a constituent as a student and
certainly more so now as alumni. We faculty come and go, you again as alumni
stay. While the above exchange of letters gives
reasons for pause, I note opposition to Duke’s segregation policy in a letter from the male
student government association to Duke’s board petitioning for desegregation dated November
29th 1959. The letter is part of a file containing the
letters I just read, the Stroud and correspondence was in the same file. The students who objected, they are probably
now like 80 years old, were ahead of many of the old timers. It was actually the trustees kept holding
to this segregation policy. At the same time, in fall 1959, as a high
school senior I applied to Duke and three other colleges. Duke was my insurance school. I applied early admission, was admitted, but
later decided to attend Oberlin College. Duke was my insurance school not because I
was so smart, but because admission standards for male students were not high. During the late 1970s or early ’80s, my father
said that great things were happening at Duke. He was correct. A major transformation had occurred, a transition
from a regional to a national university. Why did this transformation occur? I offer two reasons. One, outstanding leadership of President Terry
Sanford and the second is Duke’s elimination of racial discrimination in admissions. In 1959, Duke did not admit African Americans. Oberlin College, which I attended, had done
so since the 1830s. While there was no admissions policy at Duke
regarding geographic diversity, when I was growing up being a Yankee was a negative attribute. The South discouraged in this way by holding
this regional pride of outstanding students from the South were discouraged from applying. Now, I want to look to the future and I’m
going to get back to a similar point. The rising sticker price of higher education
represents a threat to student diversity based on income. The sticker price of a private college or
university education has been rising by about 5% a year in nominal terms 2% to 3% annually
in real terms. Now, what does this mean? This means when your children enter college,
say 25 years from now, if history is a predictor, the annual sticker price per year will be
about 130,000 per year in today’s dollars. This is amount that families even in the top
1% of income distribution will have trouble paying, especially if they have multiple family
members wanting to go to higher education. A 50% discount, because of what was here there’s
a big discount. 50% discount on 130,000 is 65,000. When I was a student in the early ’60s we
paid 2 or 3,000 a year per year. With that put in today’s dollars you could
be a Camry. With 130,000 I suggest you can buy several
Camries. What can we do about this as alumni, still
too young to be major donors? I’d list several possibilities but I’m only
going to talk about one. There’s a need for you as alumni to question
the rationale for annual increases in the sticker price. The increases are typically cast in language
that implies that raising the sticker price is a technical decision. The cost of education has increased and we’re
told that we just have to pay these increases. Yet, labor, buildings, equipment, supplies
are determined by the institution. Many factor prices including administrators,
coaches, and professors, are determined at market levels reflecting infusion of funds
in the form of tuition revenues, contributions, and other factors. The rising sticker price in the reasons for
it are complex however, I want to leave you with one of the points stressed above. Assuming you can afford it, the 130K, and
I hope you can and expect you can. Do you want your children to attend a college
or university at which they only meet students from the top 1% of the income distribution? Would they not miss a lot of experiences of
the other 99%? We’re at the risk of replacing an improvement
in racial and ethnic diversity while even further reducing the diversity of the student
body in terms of income and wealth. In conclusion, when I ask students whether
they like Duke the answer is a resounding yes. Overall, you’ve had a fabulous experience. You have been blessed with many talents, but
you face uncertainties about your futures. Individually and collectively you represent
a positive force. Do seize the opportunity to improve the welfare
of other individuals and to make Duke higher education and the world a better place. Thank you. [Connel Fullenkamp] Thank you very much for
those words, Frank. Now, it’s my pleasure to begin the part of
the ceremony where we actively recognize our graduates. We’re going to start with our Ph.D. recognition
ceremony. I would like to call to the podium our Director
of Graduate Studies Professor Curt Taylor. [Curt Taylor] Thanks, sir. Good morning. I know graduation for many of you marks a
new beginning, new challenges, new adventures. Professors are particularly happy about this
day because starting tomorrow we can wear shorts to work. I’ve been the director of graduate studies
for our Ph.D. program for the past seven years. They’ve been often wonderful years, sometimes
challenging situations. I’m glad to have done it, but I’m stepping
down as the director at the end of June and Federico will come after me. I just wanted to reflect a little bit on the
time I’ve spent as director of graduate studies and running our Ph.D. program. I’ve been called many names over the past
seven years, like Sugar Daddy, Gatekeeper, and things I can’t really say on stage on
Mother’s Day, but you can imagine. The things I’m proudest of being called are
friend and mentor. My staff and I, and I’ve had an amazing staff
working with me these past seven years, Kristen and Julianne in particular, we’ve had to deal
with some very unusual situations. We’ve had students who were robbed unfortunately. We had students who were arrested that we
had to deal with. One student quit the program to become a professional
poker player. Another quit because he missed surfing. We’ve had to deal with complicated issues
involving student’s mental health and physical health. Occasionally, students would even come to
my office and ask for dating advice. That’s way above my pay grade. It’s been my distinct honor these seven years
to help so many young men and women achieve their dream of becoming professional economists. This year’s class is one of the strongest
ever to graduate from our Ph.D. program, I’m very proud of them. Now, comes the part of the job I like the
best, I get to shake their hands and welcome them into the profession of being a professional
economist. Please join me in congratulating them. [Craig Burnside] Adam Bergeron. Vasco Botelho. Paul Eliason. Margaux Luflade. Elisa Maffioli. Jose Martinez Carrasco. Catherine Moon. Andrew Steck. Su Zhang. [Connel Fullenkamp] Thank you. Now, we’re going to move on to the master’s
programs. I like to call to the podium Professor Timur
Kuran who is head of the Master’s in Political Economy to introduce our graduates and make
some remarks. [Timur Kuran] The ceremonies that make up
graduation week at a university are called commencement exercises for a reason. They call on us not only to celebrate achievements,
but also to focus on what is beginning. In other words, they call on us to reflect
on the promise that lies ahead. In the case of our MA and MS graduates, what
has ended is a rigorous two-year program. We’ve come together with family and friends
to celebrate the hard work that won our students one of four master’s degrees, an M.A. in Economics,
an M.A. in Analytical Political Economy, an M.S. in Economics and Computation, or an M.S.
in Quantitative Financial Economics. With variations in emphasis, these programs
teach higher order skills and economic analysis. They teach the student how to evaluate economic
data critically at an advanced level. They equip the student with tools to solve
complex economic problems independently as a professional. They teach the student also to communicate
the results of economic analysis in the form of well-organized presentation, paper, or
report. A word on the specific emphasis of the four
programs. The M.A. program in economics is designed
to give students a quantitative approach to economics with maximum flexibility to fit
future goals. The M.A. program in analytical political economy
is a joint degree with the political science department. It is designed to focus student’s attention
on relationships between politics and markets. An M.S. in economics and computation serves
the needs of students interested specifically in solving economic problems using big data. The M.S. in quantitative financial economics
is designed to give students the theoretical and empirical tools needed for a career or
a doctoral program in finance. With the theme of commencement in mind, we’re
also celebrating the doors that our graduates’ new skills have opened. For some of our graduates the door is open
to a job in consulting, government, research or management. For others, the doors open to yet another
academic program, one toward a Ph.D. in economics or in some cases, a Ph.D. in business administration,
political science, public policy, or statistical science. Students over the past two years, I’ve had
the pleasure of getting to know quite a few of you personally as your advisor, your teacher,
or simply one of your adopted mentors. I’ve seen you take on challenges and succeed
through determination. I’ve seen you face up the weakness and overcome
them. It’s given me particular joy to watch you
discover talents you didn’t know you had, sometimes in areas that weren’t on your radar
screen when you set foot at Duke. May you remain open to discovery and new challenges
because we live in a world of dizzying technological change and unpredictable shifts in social
needs. The intellectual courage and flexibility that
I observed time and again will serve you well as the future unfolds just as it will serve
a global society that sorely needs your talents. One more personal note, I know I speak for
all my colleagues in saying that we like to keep up friendships formed with students and
advisees. Do keep in touch with your professors, especially
with those who have been close mentors during your time at Duke. They will enjoy hearing about how you are
doing, where you are headed, and what impact you are making. We would like to honor two master’s graduates
for their exceptional achievements. The first is Hao Pang. Hao, would you please come up to the podium? Hao is receiving the master’s program award
for academic excellence. Not only does Hao have an outstanding academic
record, but he achieved this while taking almost entirely Ph.D.-level classes from his
very first semester in the program. In evaluating our M.A. students for academic
excellence, we take into account both grades and class difficulty. Hao has excelled on both of these metrics. Please join me in congratulating Hao. The second award goes to Carla Rodriquez. Carla, please come forward. Carla is receiving the master’s program award
for leadership. Carla was an active member of EMAC, the econ
master’s students organization. She was also in charge of the math camp at
orientation in Fall 2017. Please join me in congratulating Carla. Connel. [Connel Fullenkamp] Now, continue to recognize
our master’s students. Emma Rasiel, who is also partly in charge
of the master’s program, will call the names and will recognize the graduates. [Emma Rasiel] Thanks, Connel. Scott Wheaton. Harsh Parikh. Ipek Kavasoglu. Frances Osei-Bonsu. Myu Kulathungam. Caterina Chiopris. Anh Goen Van Dang. Natchanan Kiatrungwilaikun. Lu Huang. Yushan Zhuang. Sha Wang. Zhenglin Sun. Junyang Luo. Shiran Wang. Yu Ma. Sida Li. Lin Zhao. Thank you. Yajie Tang. Haiqi Xiao. Yiqian Wang. Zhechang Yang. Excuse me. Yu Wu. Jiahe Yuan. Jinliang Liu. Chunyu Qu. Zijian Zeng. Haonan Wu. Xingxing Zhang. Kaili Chen. Yinshi Gao. Shijie Luo. Yu Chen. Mingzi Niu. Jin Liu. Boya Xu. Le Tang. Zuwei Guo. Haoran Zhang. Yige Zhou. Jun Xu. Haonan Dong. Yechu Hua. Jialei Guo. Xuchao Gao. Feixiao Chen. Jingyi Zhang. Zeya Wang. Jieyao Wang. Hanmeng Wang. Yanlin Yu. Shuqi Cen. Yiyi Ye. Tammy Lee. Sungwoo Cho. [Connel Fullenkamp] Thank you. Now, we move on to the part of the ceremony
where we recognize our undergraduates. It is a longstanding tradition in the Economics
Department that we have a student undergraduate speaker and so I’d like to call Maya Durvasula
to the podium. While she comes up I get to embarrass her
to talk about how wonderful she is. She is one of the academic superstars in the
department. Just to give you an indication, I think she
made at least a 70% average in Econ 101 when she took my course, 70%, ladies and gentlemen,
astounding. Maya is also recognized outside of Duke. Last year she was named one of the Harry S.
Truman scholars because of her engagement with academics but also her desire to use
her academic abilities to do research to attack social problems including looking at the roots
of poverty and that became part of her senior honor thesis which won best thesis and in
the future she’s going to go on and do research for a couple of years before she decides where
to get a PhD but you can expect to hear many great things from her. Now, we have the pleasure of hearing her final
words for you graduates, Maya. [Maya Durvasula] Thank you, Professor Fullenkamp
for what was an overly flattering introduction. I’m honored and excited to speak here today
for many reasons. Chief among which is that I now have the opportunity
to say thank you to everyone. Since I’ve learned better than to draw generalizations
from a single data point I’ll avoid speaking for my peers today, but hope that every member
of the class of 2018 will join me in thanking those who had given us a home in this department
over the past four years and the privilege of a Duke Economics education. In particular, thank you to the EcoTeach staff
who made sure so many times over the past four years that each of us actually made it
to Cameron today. To the TAs and graduate students who answered
questions that were a little more than I don’t understand the question, who helped to problem
solve data error messages that included invalid something and my personal favor at the time
it just said no, and whose excitement to talk about estimators has been shockingly infectious. To the friends and family members who have
been vicariously dragged along through semesters with way too many problem sets and who, in
my case, endured and encouraged a year in which I managed to relate almost everything
back to [gold ownership in Indonesia. Also, Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms,
I’m sorry we made you sit outside for so long this morning. Of course, thank you to the professors who
have become mentors over the past four years. I have had many conversations with professors
in this department who have drifted off on tangents about how much they love their jobs,
and it shows. That I am truly excited to pursue a career
in economics is due almost entirely to their mentorship.Four years ago, I was pretty thrilled
to realize that there exist a formal discipline at the intersection of math and politics. That people, our professors, ask questions
like activists about prosperity, growth and well-being then financers like scientists. To be fair, I came to Econ 101 after spending
a year working in state politics. I was extremely susceptible to the promise
of rational thinking. During this time I had watched bills to fund
education and healthcare in some of the poorest places in America die after debates alternated
between well-intentioned ideology and political grandstanding. No facts, no numbers. I ended up with many, many questions for people
who run for state senate in New Mexico for the glory but more crucially realized just
how important it is to understand why and how well programs and systems work. Economics provided a vocabulary for this frustration
and more importantly, a set of skills that has made it possible to constructively reject
the idea that doing good follows for meaning well. Of course, there are many, many different
frameworks for analyzing institutions and interactions, dozens of which are being celebrated
in ceremonies just like this right now. But I imagine that one characteristic I share
with most of my peers and my professors on stage here is that the systematic approach
to choice, to the tradeoffs and incentives that motivate decision making seems like an
especially powerful way of thinking about what we encounter every single day. In Econ 101, we began by considering the ways
in which one might ration resources between smokes and jerky, an example that to be honest
my uptight vegetarian self-found wildly unappealing, but we made a simple implicit assumption with
this first example, which carried through to discussions in later classes ranging from
causality and regression analysis to competing theories of macroeconomic growth. We’ve been taught to assume in each course
that we have the tools at our disposal to describe behaviors and institutions to understand
why things work in the ways that they do up to, of course, a stochastic error term. This is the geekiest form of idealism that
I can think off that we can begin to make sense of a fundamentally random world and
it’s an approach to problem solving that seems universally applicable. When we become lawyers and policy wonks and
bankers and consultants but I think we’re all going to become consultants, I’m reminded
often that there are many pathways through the economics major and many more postgrad
options usually when a friend of mine makes fun of my literacy about all things finance
or finance or whatever it is. Some of the most valuable lessons that I’ve
learned over the past four years at Duke and in economics have nothing to do with when
you cluster standard errors and whatever LIBOR and DCF stand for. Courses in math, statistics and economics
gave us the skills to both deconstruct and reconstruct arguments, policies and systems. We were reminded that the assumption that
those we encounter are rational is not necessarily a bad one. It taught us to give our friends and enemies
some latitude to realize that they may be optimizing according to constraints and within
paradigms that we just don’t understand. We learn to think critically about choices,
how and why they’re made and how they change in response to shocks in our environment. To suggest that studying economics, the dismal
science, made us better people might be a stretch but it definitely didn’t hurt. All of this is to say thank you for four incredible
years and of course, congratulations to the Class of 2018. [Connel Fullenkamp] Thank you very much, Maya. Now, we’d like to call to the podium the director
of our honors program, Dr. Michelle Connolly to introduce and announce the awards for our
Graduates with Distinction. [Michelle Connolly] Thank you, Connel. Maya is the perfect example of our idea of
a very successful, incredibly successful experience with our students. Her emphasis on us wanting to give you the
skills to actually understand arguments, understand their strengths and weaknesses, understand
whether they can be supported or not is fundamentally one of the most, in my opinion, one of the
most important things that we need in a population no matter what field you go into later so
that we have an educated population or a population who’s willing to discuss things beyond level
of opinion. I’ve been at Duke for 21 years now. I think TJ was born that year. It makes me feel old but it also explains
why I kind of adopt a lot of the students. I think of them as my kids and I’m always
a little sad after graduation because they leave me. Every year they leave me, but they come back
and I’m usually tremendously proud of what they’re doing and love having that experience
with all of them. Now I’m going to call the names of those who
have won distinction in the major. Alican Arcasoy. Shane Cashin. Thomas James Cole III. Michael Dessau. Christopher Foote. Gwen Geng. Ryan Hoecker. Michael Jacob Kiffel. Anna Kropf. Shihab Osman Malik. Michael Thomas Marshall Jr. Neelesh Moorthy. Chinmay Pandit. Justin Rosenblum. Winner of Outstanding honors poster, student
choice. Rahul Sharma. Nick Vega. Winner of the Outstanding honors poster, faculty
choice. Moses Snow Wayne. Weiran Zeng. Little Brother, John Hamilton Zipf. Thankfully, EcoTeach knows I don’t how to
read so they gave me phonetic cards. Now we go on to those who have graduated with
high distinction in the major and the following person is one of our best honor thesis finalists,
Dane Burkholder. Angela Chen. Nicholas Gardner. Aakash Jain. Winner of our second place outstanding honors
poster, faculty choice. Michael Karamardian. CJ sent me a video to learn how to pronounce
his name today, Chin Jie Lim, and best honors thesis finalist. Following person has won second place outstanding
symposium presentation, second place outstanding honors poster, student choice, Elizabeth Lim. Christopher Glen Macgibbon. Met Clyde and Catherine, your grandparents,
yesterday. It was very nice. Frances Mitchell, second place outstanding
symposium presentation and second place honors poster, student choice. Meredith Parenti. Brian Perry-Carrera. Aasha Reddy. Rafal Rokosz. Akshaya Trivedi. Second place outstanding symposium and outstanding
honors poster. The winner of the symposium presentation,
very good theory on tennis, participation generally, Will Walker. He’s a student who not only won the best thesis
price but he won it as a junior. He is 2017’s awardee for the best thesis Jackie
Xiao. Stephanie Zhong. And this year’s best thesis recipient, Maya
Durvasula. Please join me in congratulating the economics
students who are graduating with distinction. They’ve worked really hard. Now, I’d like to welcome Professor Emma Rasiel
to the podium to continue with the recognition of the undergraduates. Thank you. [Emma Rasiel] Thank you, Michelle. It’s now my pleasure to read the names of
the undergraduates who have graduated from Duke University today. Mitchell Goldhaber. Jared Katzen. Coby Theodore Wayne. Juno Park. Kavi Prakash Sakraney. Julio Santiago. Mohammed Solimon Amed. Divya Dhulipala. Gaurish Gwalani. Bengisu Pay. Daniela Saucedo. Collin Dennis Wareham. Colin Duffy. Jonathan Chapman. Sydney Segal. Samantha Keeton Miller. Ryan Davidson. Matthew Baker. Nicholas Justice. Alexander Martin Loughnane. Michael Savitt. Ian D’silva. Jonathan Charbonneau. Jerry Li. Matthew Rock. Dennis Ling. Alexandra Huff. Marisa Witayananun. Rachelle Reiben. Rachelle Eastwood. Nikhil Perincherry. John O’Connell. Grant Benjamin Newman. Kevin Bao. Kevin Wang. Michael Shia Liu. Christian Santiago. Qinglan Fan. Shuqui Fan. Michelle Lou. Anehita Sehgal. Oisin Harrington. Samuel Lemen Brougher. Madeline Keyes. Nina Cervantes. Reed Michael Kreger. Bao Doan. Virginia Farley. Helen Lu. Avery Jackson Brust. Shuer Luo. Jing Yan Shang. [inaudible] Shuer Luo. Jiaqi Huang. Yue Miao. Michael Chiang. Zachary Ao. Eileen Yao. Gina Rhee. Jordan Samuel Taylor. Courtney Ariel Digia. Samuel Ashton Oliver. Baptiste Francois Adnet. Abhiveer Arjun. Thomas Tafoya. Diana Ye. Joyce Wen. Rishabh Kumar. Yu Kyung Han. Charlie Chen. Jason Wang. Keiley Jane Gaston. Allison Hubert. Alexander David Wakil Thompson. David Knox Croft. Ashlynn Miller. Lillian Xie. Boxong Yin. Yifan Song. Eric Liang Jiang. Samantha Siegel. Nikita Gawande. Jun Jun Feng. Andew Zhang. Christina Cheng. Erin Seong. [inaudible] Sean Michael Gilbert. Samuel Konolige. Christopher Cendrowski. Rohan Mehrotra. Christine Song. Sanjukta Santra. Sakshi Khanna. Manuel Angulo. Daniella Francesca Prager. Wilson Foster Rowe. Charles Lu. Jake Turchetta. Matthew Livingston. Cooper Harrison Roman. Nathaniel Reed Edenfield. Tyler Halpern. Harsh Sharma. Megan Kathleen Horey. Marielle Rodgers. Deborah Liu. Douglas Miller McLaurin. Rishi Sachdev. Derek Wong. Oliver Kilpatrick. Matthew Robert Sullivan. Noah Gray. Ian Michael Silvers. Rahul Sharma. Omar Mangal. Victor Vandekerckhove. Jaser Rollins. James Martelli-Raben. Peter Koch. Noi Omaboe. Chetan Reddy. Ade Okunyade. Eric Hirsberg. Gregory Vuong. Richard Law. Ibrahim Cem Polat. Engin Polat. Chris Taylor. Matthew Johnson. Colt Michael Sessions. Travis John Closs. Ogechi Onyeka. Aliza Makhani. Brooke Huang. Vivian Tan. Sean Klasson. Michael Kusnierek. Surya Prabhakar. Christopher Lewis. Michael James Gattas. William Kline. Madison Shaw. Matthew Mejia-Johnson. Michael Camarda. Trevor Holland Hanson. Antonio Calderon. John David Strickland. Alexander Carbonelli. Taylor Charbonneau. Dante Joseph Cordaro. Daniel Calabretta. Peter Yang. Jorge Enrique Mesa. Maxine Ow. Maxine! Min Yeol Yoon. Daniel Kim. [Craig Burnside] Once again, please join me
and please do so with your maximal whoops. I’d like to congratulate the Class of 2018. Whoo! Before you all leave, there are a few important
reminders. One is to please put your recyclables or trash
in the appropriate receptacles on your way out because we have another ceremony in Cameron
coming soon after this one. If you are an honor student, please collect
your poster. I’d also like to thank my faculty colleagues
who attended today. And most of all, I’d like to thank our staff
for the incredible organizational work that they do for this ceremony and for coming out
on Mother’s Day. Finally, to all the graduates’ families and
friends, thank you for coming and safe travels.