DMC Board of Regents Regular Meetings October 8, 2019

DMC Board of Regents Regular Meetings October 8, 2019

October 15, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


(upbeat electronic music) (dramatic music) (gavel banging) – Call the meeting of the Board of Regents of Del Mar College to order at one PM. It is Tuesday, October eighth. Welcome everyone. Thank you for being here today. We do have a quorum and
can conduct business. Dr. Sherwood, would you please lead us. Oh, before we do that, let’s
have our moment of silence. I almost, reading out of order here. Moment of silence please. Thank you. Dr. Sherwood, would you lead
us in the Pledge of Allegiance? – [All] I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. And to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God,
indivisible with liberty and justice for all. – Would you please join
me as we read together the Del Mar College vision statement? – [All] Del Mar College
will be the premier choice for life-changing
educational opportunities, provided by responsive,
innovative faculty and staff who empower students to improve local and global communities. – Del Mar College is
streaming live audio and video from our official Board
of Regents meetings on the college’s website in real time with the exception of
portions of the meeting considered as closed statute, as closed session by statute. As we start off today, I
would like to thank the staff and for those folks who are wearing pink in Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Go pink. Thank you all very much for that. And we’re gonna begin
today with staff reports, hearing our Clery statistics. Dr. Escamilla. – Dr. Lewis and Ms. Lauren White
will lead this conversation but Regents and to the greater community, every year at this month
we present the college’s statistics for, as per the Clery Act which is a federal responsibility and this is the time of the year that we demonstrate to the
college where our challenges still are but overall, how
safe a campus that we keep and how fortunate we are for that and that’s not an accident. With that being said, Dr. Lewis. – Thank you. So I’ll give you a
little bit of background and reminder about the
Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and
Campus Crime Statistics Act, or what’s called the Clery Act. It’s a federal mandate
requiring all institutions of higher education that participate in the federal student
financial aid program to make known crimes
occurring on their campus and in the surrounding community. The Clery Act is enforced
by the U.S. Department of Education and institutions
that fail to comply are penalized with hefty fines and may be suspended from participating in federal financial aid programs. To be in full compliance, Del Mar College must do three things. First, publish and distribute
the annual security and safety report to current students, prospective students, and
employees by October first of each year. You have that document
in your board packet and we have separate documents. The report must include crime statistics for the past three years,
campus policies about safety and security measures, campus
crime prevention programs, and list procedures to be
followed in the investigation of alleged sex offenses. The second thing is to
provide students and employees with timely warnings of
crimes that represent a threat to their safety. And third, DMC security
must keep and make available a crime log of all crimes reported to them in the past 60 days. The full report is, as I
said, in your board packet but it’s also available to the public on the college’s website. Ms. White is gonna talk about
any of the crime statistics that you see in front of you. – So in the booklet, which I
want to do a few thank yous. I want to thank College
Relations for their assistance. I also want to thank
IT for their assistance in making sure that we
had it on our web page in compliance with the Clery Act. And I also wanna thank
those who contributed to it, the Dean of Students
Office, College Relations and also Environmental Health and Safety and of course Security. As you can see, our statistics
show that in comparison of course to other years
that we are doing very well. Nothing astronomical or
necessarily outstanding in the actual numbers, either
on the east or west campus. You will note that there are a few things on the Northwest Center
but see that at the top that happened on non-campus property and those were tied into the hospital that’s out on that property. The rest of it, of course,
is for you to look at. I did want to also give
you a little update on where we are in regards
to the police department. Our needs assessment has been drafted and is in the final process of approval. The funding source, of
course, was issued by you all through the board action. Our physical resources that
we have to have available to police officers have
been identified and budgeted for this upcoming year. The actual physical location,
everything is pretty well complete except for the completion
of our Operations Center where the video cameras and
the computers will be going and we’re working on that closely with IT. The general rules manual is under draft. The proposed administrative structure that is also required by
TCL has been proposed. Something that was new recently
as the TCL recommendations about our 911 and so we are in the process of establishing a working
relationship with Metrocom, which is the regional 911 and
also with New Oasis County for housing of prisoners if that need be and then the final thing that
we’re in the process of doing is I have also contacted CCPD because TCL requires a background check
on your chief of police and I, surprisingly enough, they
won’t let me do my own. (people laughing) So, CCPD has agreed to
assist us with that. With a, I’m sorry, I
was gonna let you know. We hope to have all the
paperwork turned into the state within the next couple of
months and then hopefully a licensing agreement with them in the first part of 2020. – So Lauren, just to be clear. If there’s any need for
detention of an individual, it sounds like that place to hold a person would be with the county
in the county jail? – So (clears throat) in
what we’re proposing to do to start off with, it would
be, as long as we have CCPD officers also assisting Del Mar College Police Department, we would be able to utilize the city’s detention facility. – [Mark] Okay, the city’s
detention facility. – But if there were no
CCPD officers on duty at the time an arrest were made then we have to have an
agreement with the county and that would be the normal
place to take them to. – [Mark] Okay, thank you. – So you anticipate both of
those agreements in place by the end of the year? – [Lauren] Hope to have. – Hope to have them in place. – [Lauren] Right. That’s what we’re aiming for. – [Carol] Any questions on
the Clery Act information? Ms. Estrada. – Ah yes, first of all I’d like to say that I’m very proud of
our Del Mar students. Let me turn this thing off, I’m sorry. We had hardly any violations but I do have a couple of questions. – Sure. – Why are we listing violations under non-campus, off-campus? Why are we counting this against Del Mar? If something happened off-campus,
why are they being listed, like if you look at the,
let’s say under 2018, non-campus property. There’s two. – [Lauren] Right. – What does that mean? That they didn’t happen on campus? – Right so for example, like the airport. The airport we have just a certain section that we’re there but because of the way the Clery Law is written,
we have to account certain things. So, for example, the Clery
section is I have to account everything that occurred on this campus, anything that happens in the street, and I have to include the
sidewalk across the street. – [Elva] Okay. – So the sidewalk across
the street isn’t ours. – [Elva] Correct. – But if a crime occurred over there that’s non-campus property
but it has to be in our stats so that they have a good understanding of, not just what happens on campus, but what’s happening in our area. – That was the concern that I had. Okay, and let me ask you another question. – [Lauren] And those, I’m
sorry to interrupt you, but those stats do come from the Corpus Christi Police Department. That’s where I get those from. – [Elva] Okay, I noticed
or maybe I just missed it that we don’t have any guns on campus by non-licensed holders. Do, you know, going back
to the campus, Gary, have we had any problems with that? Kids bringing guns to school without? – No ma’am. We’ve had, the only call that I can recall that was recent, we had
one person on campus that we did approach and
we found out that he was actually law enforcement attending
a class in plain clothes. – [Elva] Or licensed to carry. – [Lauren] And he was licensed, yes. Because he is law enforcement,
he’s licensed to carry. Yes ma’am. – [Elva] Okay, thank you. – [Lauren] Yes ma’am. – [Gabriel] Like that situation
happened across the street from the garage with those two kids. – [Carol] Your microphone? – [Gabriel] I tried to turn it
on but it doesn’t (mumbles). – [Carol] That middle button. There you go. (man mumbling) Okay. – The situation with the
kids that took the car and they ran (background
noise drowns out speaker). They were there in that
building for a while and the police cordoned off everything, thank you, and the police cordoned off the area, would that be included in this report? Have to be included? – [Lauren] So– – Nearby and Del Mar was
mentioned several times. – Right. Right, so the interesting
thing in reference to that is as you can see, we don’t
report all crimes that occur. We report certain crimes that occur and the actual crime that
those students were accused of was an aggravated robbery. – [Mark] Were they students? – Not students, I’m sorry. – Okay, I was just making sure. Hold on, hold on, hold, on. – Juveniles. I think they’re students
somewhere but not here. – They may be students somewhere but– – Not here, yes, yes. – Let’s not take all the credit. (people laughing) – Okay. Sorry. But the ones that those young individuals were involved in was a
robbery that occurred, not within our reporting district. The fact that they happened
to run into a building that would technically
be across the street but according to what Clery says is I only have to count the sidewalk. So they were in the building. So that would not be. Plus, them running to that location isn’t one of our reportable crimes. – And we don’t have to report either when the media announces
something happened and it was a former Del Mar
student or anything like that? – Right, if it didn’t happen on campus, and I believe, I mean, we’ve had several but it didn’t occur on our
campus and therefore it’s not. The only time I would say
that there’s an issue there and this also comes
into it is if they’re on a school sponsored trip
and something happens, then those numbers have to be in there even though they didn’t
happen on our property but it was a school sponsored trip. Like when they go to Austin, if something were to happen
that’s a reportable crime then I would have to put those in there but they would fall under
one of those other categories either public property
or non-campus property. – [Gabriel] Okay. Makes sense. – Any other questions? Thank you very much Ms. White. – Thank you. – Thank you for the update as well. – Yes ma’am. – Next we will hear a staff report on our enrollment update. – Regents, as we do on a regular basis for the past several
years, we’re gonna give you an enrollment update. This is a relatively
short enrollment update for a couple of reasons. One, we’re not in a funding cycle but we certainly do watch
our trends because there are revenues associated with
enrollment and so forth but this is a snapshot of
the activities occurring that affect the fall semester. That being said, Dr.
Silva is gonna describe it in more detail. But again, by no means is
this the exhaustive report that we typically give
you and that usually comes every other year. But again, this is our
annual October fall report. – Thank you Dr. Escamilla. Madame Chair and Board Regents, like Dr. Escamilla said we’re not gonna go take a deep dive on this
one because not based here but we will talk about trends. As you will see for 2019,
our preliminary numbers are 12,205. Just as a note, you will see
a notation in the bottom left. Our all-time record high is 12,236 and that occurred in the fall 2010. So you will see for the last two years we’ve been flirting with that number, just underneath that number. Also, like Dr. Escamilla said, trends, if you look at this trend
you will see from fall 2015 to fall 2019 a steady increase
in the last five years except for 2017. As we all know, that was the
year of Hurricane Harvey. And so, that is our count for right now. We’re gonna be enrolling
for the spring semester November fourth, so it’s
right around the corner as well and starting on the
flex for our spring semester, our 15 weeks and second eight weeks, that will be based here. So we’ll be looking into
those numbers already. So we’re already getting ready for that. There are two groups that we
like to report traditionally in our enrollment reports and that’s our VIP and dual credit. In our VIP this year, you’ll
see that we 182 students. For those of you who attended the State of the University
address last week with Dr. Quintanilla, she
actually had this graph up on her presentation as well. Both institutions are
very happy and supportive of this program. We expect this program to grow and we are in constant communications with the university as well. And so, it’s one of these
programs that really benefits both institutions. – Again, just real quick,
Dr. Silva, on that one, remember those 182 students, Regents, in the VIP program, the
vast majority of them are coming from different
parts of the state. They’re coming to live
here at the university. We have a dedicated best bus line. Thank you to RTA. We’ve been working with them. We’re covering some minimal costs there to make sure that this is
provided for the students. They’re using it and
it’s a wonderful program that is, again, bringing people in that would not otherwise be
coming to Corpus Christi. – [Rito] Yes, absolutely. We’re very proud of that program. – [Carol] Can I expect the future target? For the future target, is
that one year, five years? – [Rito] I would expect
that in a couple of years. I would say two years. We are, again, just as
early as two weeks ago, we have a new Vice President
of Enrollment Services and he has expressed his
interest in growing the program quicker than what we thought
it was gonna grow as well. So, again, all signs turn to, and of course Dr.
Quintanilla is wonderful. She’s very supportive
of the program as well. – We think this program has the capacity to grow much beyond the 300
and those are our targets. I think there’s been, again, there’s been some leadership changes and shifts over there and
adjustments at A&M-CC. We’re waiting, those are
settling in nicely now and we think the 300 was not too far away. – Sure. And just a side benefit
if I could tell you about this program, our
staff have to work so closely together for the last year and a half putting this program together. Just the relationships between
them where it’s non-VIP, just to call over there
for certain students who need help with scholarships
or anything like that, their relationship has grown really well that they can pick up a
phone, they know who to call and it’s very kind of seamless now. So that’s one of those added benefits that’s not directly related to VIP but just the fact that we’re
working so closely together with them has really helped
that interaction as well. And then the other student
group we like to talk about quite a bit is our dual credit headcount. Again, it is at a slight increase. The 2,543 for this semester, that is 29 independent school districts that we’re working with
and about 36 high schools that we work with. And so, again, that dual credit program is another great program. It’s a great benefit for
the students in our area. A great benefit for the
parents in the area too. And that’s what we’ve been
going to go talk about. The financial benefits for students taking a program in high school
and saving that money by just the tuition costs,
not just the tuition costs but also the books and
housing is tremendous. So we keep on out there and
talking about this program and again, we also meet with
our counterparts at CCISD to strengthen the programs. – Rito, if I may just add
just a quick story on this. One of our students
from, I think, 2012, 13, in that area was at
Sinton, Sinton High School. This young lady was
taking several classes. Never intended to graduate
from Del Mar College. In fact, never did. End of graduating from
the University of Texas and as of just a couple
weeks ago came back as the new news anchor at channel three. Okay? Stay tuned. That’s just a little
tickler for everybody. I’m gonna be bringing her back. She’s a dear friend of the family’s. I remember helping her on a tough, there’s a technical issue that Mr. Alfonso probably doesn’t remember
his team helping her through on Canvas or something. But anyway, just a little story about many of those students who do
not intend to graduate that benefited very much from
there and are coming home. Stay tuned. – Those are always great stories to hear. And again, Regents, it wasn’t a deep dive. I wanted to just give you a snapshot of what’s going on right now. We’re currently working and
getting students registered for the second eight weeks, which starts in two weeks already so
it’s an ongoing effort. So, any questions? – A couple of questions. Eline. What’s our full time eLine student count? – We actually have, are you talking about for dual credits students? – No, the full time students
that are taking the eLines. – [Rito] Okay. – The traditional student. – [Rito] Sure. I don’t have just for dual credits only. I’m not sure if, do we? – [Mark] You’re just
talking about all students? Are you or are you talking
about dual credit students? – I have the number for
dual credit students but. – Who’s taking the eLine? – Yeah, 10%. It’s close, I just talked
to Cody the other day and it’s around 10, 12%. I’m guessing. I don’t have it here in front of me. We’ll get that– – And what’s the trend? Is that increasing as a percentage? – So, very few, very few
on the full time side. That’s been, you know, when
I met with Cody the other day and we were talking just about eLearning because we’re getting ready
for our full presentation on that coming up soon. Stay tuned. I’m sorry? – Next month. – Next month. We’ll have all those details for you but– – [Ed] I can wait. – You can? Okay, great. ‘Cause Cody’s the expert and
you can tell I’m not with the, I didn’t have that ready
but very timely questions coming next month. – And I’ve got a couple more questions. It looks like our increase
from last year is 46 students. Is that correct? – [Rito] Correct, yes sir. – And our increase in dual
credit students would be 145. So that would mean our decrease
in traditional students is 99 from last year to this year. Am I correct on that? – [Rito] That would be correct. – And I’m looking at the nine year trend from 2010 to this year and it looks like our dual credit’s up about 1,348 and our traditional student
count is down 1,379. So, it looks like the national trend is happening right here. – So here’s the other
part that’s not in here because we just, it has
yet to be calculated. What we’re doing as we speak is there’s another part
of the fall semester that’s not gonna count,
be counted towards fall or anything else but
these will be individuals who will be here this
fall, the second half and we are opening up, how many sections? – It’s 50 sections this
second eight weeks. In comparison we had 19 sections. – Yes we have 50 new sections. Again, it’s not quite apples and apples but they’re all the people that, this is a new trend of ours, this is something we’re working towards with the eight week strategy and opening up 50 more sections. I just found out right
before this board meeting that number but that means
50 unique opportunities for students to come in
and add to that number. Now, those are students,
a lot of those students are some that came in
in the beginning of fall and we’re recapturing and
we’re reaching back out to. So those are students that we didn’t get into the system initially and so, and not all of ’em are obviously gonna be filling all those classes but
we’re making a great effort of which there’s several
hundred of ’em out there that we’re seeking to recapture. So we have some new
strategies that are gonna, my point with all this is
we have some new strategies that are gonna change the way
these numbers look and shift and we have to take snapshots and give ’em to the coordinating board at certain times and then we’re gonna give you those data but we also, this is
kind of the Paul Harvey rest of the story that’s coming out that’ll affect it. But to your point, the trends for our campuses right now are exactly what you’re saying. But at the same time,
we’re fighting every one of those trends every which way we can. – And so in the last nine
years, the enrollment’s flat and the dual credit’s up and
the traditional students down. – That last point that I would make, in addition to what you’re saying, I’m not trying to contradict by any means, in addition to what
you’re saying is the fact that we’re up at all in that category during, where the unemployment
is at an all-time low. We should be down. We should be down overall. We have, and we have, I don’t
think the chart’s in here but I was doing a presentation last week to a couple of places, Mayor’s
interagency and others, where the trend is splitting. Where we’re slightly up when
the unemployment is going down. We should be down in the credit side. So we’re bucking that trend. I think you and I talked
about that one the other day. It’s a tough, it’s a tough, tough market with the capacity that we have right now, with the teaching capacity
and the number of, what the situation we have and again, if we adhere to the strategic plan as we say we’re going to and
live by that strategic plan, I think we’re gonna see
some trends continue to do better than we have in the past. – I guess the last question I have is is this where we expected to be? – So, with this unemployment market, with this unemployment
rate, I would have said that we would have been down. In fact– – Our budget was done for even, for zero. – Yeah, we budgeted for
fall for a flat increase and the fact that we’re up a percent, a little over a percent, not quite. I predict, I put my money on the table and said two percent, we’re
gonna be up two percent because of what I was
hearing in the community. Dr. Lewis said one percent. She was more accurate than I was. The fact that we’re up
at all in this economy is surprising. It doesn’t make traditional
sense, if you will. It doesn’t make logical sense. – But since 2010, we’re really not up. Is that where we expected to be? – Given the strategies
that we have, you know, of the traditional student, given where we are it is
a more gradual increase than what we had. We’ve been growing in dual credit. Well, Mr. Bennett, I’m thinking
we’re doing really good all things considered. – It looks like it’s
meeting the national trend, the dual credit’s up,
the traditional’s down. – Yeah, in some ways but
I still think there’s, that’s not the whole story yet. The story’s developing is what I’m saying. – And, as you’re looking
forward, Regent Bennett, it’s hard to look at to, ’cause everything changes, the economy. But Dr. Escamilla appointed
a strategic enrollment management team that has
met two, three weeks ago. We’re meeting again in about two weeks to look at what we can do
for our traditional students to increase student, and I really think that we can do that. We’re looking at the time the
students want to take classes. Traditionally, nine to one. We’re looking at having, what we call, need to have more products on
the shelves, offering classes. So we’re bringing together
the academic deans, the student service deans,
the college relations office all to be able to look down the road and increase what we’re
calling traditional enrollment. – [Ed] Very good. – Dr. Silva, are Collegiate High School and Branch Academy students counted in this dual credit number? So those are 750, 800 students who are, ’cause there’s 400 at Collegiate and another possible 400
at Branch Academy, correct? – [Rito] A little bit less
but that’s about right. – [Mark] A little bit less. – Okay, so those students
are actually on campus. – [Rito] Yes ma’am. – So of that 2500 number,
750 to 800 are on campus not at another high school. – [Rito] Correct, yes ma’am. – So assuming that all
2500 are someplace else that we’re not having to house
them I think is important. Maybe in future years you can show of that dual credit number
how many are Collegiate and Branch Academy because,
again, they’re on campus. So it’s not, it is different
than our traditional student because they’re still in high school but I think it’s important to note that they are physically on campus. – [Rito] Sure, absolutely. – Dr. Sherwood. – I just wanted to say
that the head count numbers are important but I think another thing that we would probably wanna look at are the semester credit
hours because that’s really a truer picture of, I think, even though we’re not in a funding
year, it’s a truer picture of what the patterns are
with student enrollment. – [Mark] Yes. – Absolutely. Sure and I think when
Vice President Garcia talks a little bit later, he’ll talk about the upward tick in the tuition revenue. I don’t wanna take your
presentation from you but that shows that probably
when the head count’s not always up, maybe
they’re taking more classes. With that and combined
with the increased tuition. – Dr. Sherwood, you nailed it. When we go over the
financials, you’re gonna see some very interesting numbers. Head count is good but
credit hour production is, to answer your question, we just adopted a five year strategy so what we did 10 years
ago, the strategic plan, is different than what’s gonna
look for the next five years. So it’s very hard to talk
about what transpired over 10 year based on that
five year strategic plan and what it’s gonna look
over the next five years. To your point, Chair, Madame Chair, is this next five years
is really student focused and we’re gonna really see, we’re predicting some pretty good numbers as a result of that vision
and some strategic initiatives that Rito kicked off about a week ago to talk about ideas and initiatives. – [Carol] Any other questions? Yes sir? – There’s no question that
the dual credit courses, that, you know, that
should go up every year. No question. Okay? And the more that we get it out there and that people know and stuff because it’s not gonna
cost us much, right? But my question is is that if any student registers here and let’s
say that his total bill is 3,000 or whatever, what does he do? I mean, I’ve heard that they
have to pay like half of it and some, they can’t pay half. I mean, so, you know
what I’m talking about? Is that something that’s– – Well, it could be if a student selects to do an installment plan
then that is half down. – [Hector] Right. – And so that is for students
who don’t get financial aid or don’t get anything. Yeah, that’s one of the options ’cause they can either pay in full or use the installment
plan so it sounds like you might be talking to a student who selected to do an installment plan. – [Hector] Right. So you’re saying half
down right off the bat? – Correct. – [Hector] I mean, I don’t see how kids can afford that, parents. Not here, not anymore. – And that is, in order
for us to report a student according to board, the
corny board wants 50% down to be able to do that. – Well, I think that
that’s one of the things that we really need to look at, you know? Because, I mean, that’s gonna be hard. I mean, it’s hard for
me if I were to do that. My daughter, my kids, whatever, you know? 1500, they don’t have it. So we have to, as
grandparents, help ’em out. And I suspect that’s something
that’s happening all over and so some kids I would
know that they can’t because they can’t come up with that. So you’re gonna do an installment plan but yet right off the bat. That’s like going and buying a car the way they have it at the ads. They’re gonna pay 169 a month but then down there it says
you gotta give 10% or 20% down. Come on, same thing is happening here. So the kids, I mean, right
now the kids, they won’t. Sure, so I think that
that’s one of the things that maybe we need to
look at and of course that’s me talking, you
know, but I know that kids or parents tell about that
and said we couldn’t register because of that so. And I understand, you
know, the installment plan. Yeah, but half of whatever
the bill is, it’s hard. – [Rito] Sure, sure. And for those students
we really wanna encourage the financial aid as well. – Yeah and of course, you know, and I try to encourage
people about financial aid no matter what because
anything’s gonna help, you know? – [Rito] Absolutely. – And so, you know, I like the idea that now anybody qualifies
for financial aid will automatically, SCOG or
TPAC’s gonna be brought up to ’em because some of ’em
didn’t know about that, you know, unless they put it in there that they wanted to apply for that but you were telling me the last time that it’s gonna be already– – [Rito] And those funds come at a first come first served basis. – Right and I understand
that, first come first served. – [Rito] Yes sir. – So then, so when it
comes in and it’s early, we don’t have to tell that
student because he was there early and stuff and the
money was there, right? But, again, that was
something that really, when I heard about that
I said, wow, you know? I mean, can you imagine
if the bill was 4,000 and they gotta come up with 2,000? – [Mark] It won’t, that,
it won’t be that high ever. – Yeah, but I mean, I’m just saying. You know, but let’s say 3,000. – Well, the most would be 2500. Even then that’s, even an
out of district student, an out of district student
would be around 2,000 for a full load. – [Rito] For a full load. – [Hector] For a full load, yeah. It’s gotta be a full time student, okay, but let’s say 2,000. Still, you know, $1,000 is still– – At the end of the day, every, the number’s relative and
whether it’s 4,000, 2,000, or 1,000, it’s all the
same if it’s not there and we understand that and
we, with Mr. Joseph and others in financial aid, the team,
we do everything we can to make sure we don’t turn away students that don’t have the funds. We sit down with ’em, we engage ’em. We help them go through those processes and make sure that they have, that they understand what
all their opportunities are. I know Joseph was right there. Joseph, come on up on this one. This one’s really important. This is all about the student experience. Joseph is our Director of Financial Aid. When those students are coming through, describe how they’ll come through, Joseph, and when they describe
their needs and what we do to retain as many as we
possibly can on the front end. – So the idea now is, you know, a student when they fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and
we receive their ISIR record, a clean ISIR record. We try to, we automatically
package them a Pell Grant if they’re eligible. We automatically accept
that Pell Grant as well. So that way those resources
are already available and like Dr. Silva mentioned, on a first come first served
basis, if they qualify for additional aid like a
Texas Public Education Grant or Texas Education Opportunity
Grant or SCOG grant, we try to give them at
least one other grant so they’re covering
tuition and fees, books, and then a little bit
of money for hopefully educational related expenses. But, as Dr. Escamilla mentioned, we’re trying to engage the student more by our communication patterns up front. When we’re reaching out to the student and sending them award
letters, not necessarily having to come in and
request the additional funds. If we have it, we’re gonna give it ’cause, you know, we don’t get
bonuses or anything like that if we hold onto those funds. So definitely our job is
to administer that aid to those students up front
and try to spread the wealth as much as possible. We wanna try to help as many
students as we can, sir. – No and I understand financial aid. If a kid, you know, qualifies
for financial aid, heck yes. School’s almost gonna be free. I’m just saying about the
ones that don’t qualify for financial aid. You know, and there’s,
they gotta come upfront half of what their bill is, it’s gonna be hard. – That’s always our hope
that they will engage the financial aid office. Come over, let’s talk about it. What can we do as an office. Maybe they don’t qualify for Pell Grants but maybe a state grant
that we can assist them with or some institutional
funds that we can try, we wanna try to be or
engage the student more and that’s the environment we’re creating. – With the foundation as well. – Yeah and that’s what
I was kinda looking for. You know, what else is
there that we can do? When I go out there and
talk to parents or kids or whatever ’cause I’m always
trying to let ’em know, you know, about what we’ve
got here and, you know, and where the kids can just come on here and get all their basics outta here and then they can go
someplace else, right? And since Del Mar is really recognized as far as it’s less costly
here than it would be in a four year school, okay? And the fact that Del Mar Junior College has always been recognized as a very highly academic institution. Ever since I’ve known
Del Mar, it’s been rated real high academically. Okay but the fact is that
I think that we are now in a situation where things
have changed so much. You know? It’s changed so much for a lot of people and one of ’em is, sure, if a kid comes in and what you just said,
really, that I like. The fact that you said
that hey, if the kid, okay, only if they know. If they don’t know that
and they tell ’em there, well, you gotta come up with so much and they don’t tell ’em that to go and see what anybody else can do. They’re not gonna do it. They’re gonna walk away. But anyway, that’s just– – [Rito] Sure. – You know, folks that talk with us. – We’d always encourage
all students to come see our financial aid office. Even if they’re not
eligible for Pell Grants, like we said (mumbles) there
might be something else they’re eligible for and
then we can also refer them to a foundation and there’s
also loans available. Now, we try to do loans as last options. We all know that we don’t
want our students to be leaving us with debt. – [Hector] Right. – So that’s the last
option but if it’s whether not to go to school or go to school, I think an investment
in their schooling is, might be worth doing. – ‘Cause you know, even
the books nowadays, you know, if the kid
qualifies for tuition and fees and then the books, I mean,
they cost an arm and a leg now. You know? – [Rito] Absolutely. – Very expensive books, right? And so, anyway the fact is that, yeah, you’d like to be able to do
as, we like to do as much as we can and I appreciate
anything you guys can do to try and make it easier for these people so they can enroll and they can be here and eventually, who knows? You know? I mean, I came to Del Mar
and I was not the brightest student in the world. You know what? But I made it and I got my masters and if anybody said this crazy guy was gonna have his
masters I would have said, you’re crazy, because I didn’t. I got kicked out of
Texas A&M Corpus Christi. I got kicked out (mumbles)
because I didn’t have the grades. Right? And so now I’ve got my
masters and I did it and it was just a matter
of giving that opportunity that I didn’t know I had. They gave me the opportunity
and I was able to do it and I just want the same
opportunity to be given to all the people here
in Corpus in south Texas, you know, in our region because– – [Mark] Absolutely. – They deserve it, you know? And that’s what we are now. Economically, yes, they’re
not all that well stable a lot of ’em and a lot of
the kids that we have here, same thing. And so, all I’m saying is I appreciate what you just said, sir, but,
you know that you guys try to do everything you can
to keep our kids here because you never know that kid eventually he’s gonna do okay. He’ll wake up like I did and
he’s gonna say, you know what, I can do it. – [Rito] Yes sir. – So thanks a lot so much. – [Rito] Thank you, yes sir. – [Carol] Thank you sir. – There are, just while you’re up there, there are a lot of kids that do qualify for financial aid but for
some reason or another the parents don’t wanna
fill out the paperwork. Are we doing anything
to try to encourage that or try to change that way of thinking? – Yes sir. So one of the messages that
we’re trying to put out in the high schools and is, you know, letting families
know that everybody qualifies for something. It doesn’t matter if
you make $10,000 a year or a million dollars a year. Everybody is eligible to receive some form of financial aid. How much and what type is determined on, so that message that
we’re sending and like, we’re in the process of
hiring a financial aid outreach advisor which
we’re really thankful for because that person will
be a one on one contact in the high schools. Right now I’m kind of picking
up some of that slack, going to the high schools myself, talking to parents, presenting. I’ll be at H.M. King tomorrow evening and then Thursday I’m in Sinton. Anybody that’ll listen to me, I’ll tell them that you
qualify for something. It doesn’t matter what
your income level is but what type of financial
aid is what we gotta determine based on expected family
contribution and things like that. But parents are, in some cases, reluctant to provide that so the
only option that a student would have would be unsubsidized loan and they actually indicate
that on the FAFSA application. I’m unable to provide
prevalent information. Then they’ll ask if they
have a special circumstance. If they do not, they’ll just
give ’em an unsubsidized loan only which we really don’t
want that for our students but we try to talk to the
parents but ultimately the bottom line is it’s their decision. – [Mark] And there’s also
the new law, Regents– – Exactly. – That requires all high school seniors to fill out the FAFSA
before they graduate. – That’s my next question. – The big push is coming. Things are changing. – Is that already in effect? – Yes, it’s already started
and the state of Louisiana found it to be a very
positive experience there. They had some really good outcomes and that’s gonna be having a big impact on all of our students as well. – [Rito] It’s already
in effect here in Texas. – Yes. – They will actually
be required in 2022, 23 is when it will be officially– – So it’s not–
– It’s the freshman. – Sophomores this year. – [Mark] Sophomores, my kid’s class. – Okay.
– By the time they’re seniors they’ll be required. So schools are kinda
getting used to the idea so that’s why, I mean, it’s like we’re in almost every high school like
every night somewhere else. Yes sir. – Thank you all very much. We kind of got a little far
field on enrollment update into financial aid but
those are the things that impact enrollment so thank
you all very much for that. – Thank you.
– Thank you. – Our next report is going
to be on the write-offs from our accounts receivable. Mr. Garcia. – Afternoon Madame Chair, Mr. President, members of the Board of Regents. Regarding student receivable write-offs in accordance with board policy 4.20, I am recommending the
write-off of receivables for financial reporting purpose valued at $232,000 and 231. 232,231. These receivables relate
to operating activities from fall 2015 to summer 2016 and they represent less than one percent of the annual gross
tuition and fee revenues. During the three year period ending today, the college has attempted
various collection efforts on these receivables that
include student billing, sending collection letters and
placing student account holds preventing the college from
issuing student related records. It is important to note that
the student account hold will remain in place until
the financial obligation is paid in full. So, Madame Chair, Mr. President,
members of the Regent, that concludes my report for today. – [Mark] Questions. – [Carol] Are there any questions? Ms. Averyt? Dr. Sherwood? – I just wanted to ask about
the largest number there, the financial aid adjustments. Can you help us understand
that one a little bit more? – Sure, absolutely. So the majority of the receivable
relates to the Title IV return of financial aid funds. This is a requirement. To return financial aid back to the U.S. Department
of Education no later than 45 days after the student
has withdrawn from classes. And so, because, you know,
we have a large amount of part time students,
they’re very transient and sometimes it’s very
difficult to get a hold of and talk to ’em about settling
this outstanding obligation. – [Libby] Do we contract
with an outside firm at all to help with collections? – Very good question. So I would have to say
up until two years ago we had a business relationship
with a collection agency and fortunately, the benefits
did not justify the cost and so we are currently
working on, John and myself and some other, my colleagues, to issue an RFQ to see
if we can partner up with another collection agency. So, more to come on that. – And does this number stay
relatively flat year to year? Is it something that we budget for? – So that is a good question. So, my conversation with
our Controller, John, who is currently out at
a very important meeting with one of our important committees, it’s my understanding that
it’s always been below one percent of total revenue. So it’s pretty much consistent. So there hasn’t been any
anomalies, I wanna say, in the last five years. – And how does it work as
far as the financial aid? Like, if I qualified for financial aid and so then that money’s
not gonna be given to me right there, is it? When I register they’re gonna
take tuition fees from there? I mean, how does that
work because, I mean, are you talking about the
people that don’t pay it back? Are we talking about the loans or are we talking about financial aid? – So this particular,
the big dollar amount that you see right here, let
me point this out for you. – [Rito] The 169. – The 169, that’s the
federal financial aid return of funds piece that we
were just talking about and Rito, can you talk about
a little bit more on that? – [Rito] Sure, Regent
Salinas, what happens is when a student has an account, let’s say $1200 and that is deducted from their tuition fees so
nothing comes out of pocket. After the 12th class day,
they receive whatever is owed to them back. – [Hector] Yeah. – What this money talks
to and Dr. Sherwood, to your question, is students who withdraw after we give them the money. So after the 12th class
day, we’ve given Raul Garcia the money and then he
withdraws from school before the 60th class day,
those are the students who then owe money. That’s what we call
the return to Title IV. – [Hector] Yeah, because it’s
not just the tuition fees but anything. The books can be also
taken out of there, right? – [Rito] Yes, exactly. It’s tuition fees– – [Hector] Whatever’s left at the end because that’s the one that they withdraw. If they withdraw after the 12th class day, that’s the one that, you know,
you’re gonna try and get? – [Raul] Yes, yes. That is correct. – [Carol] Any other questions or comments? This is an administrative report so there’s no action on this. Thank you, Mr. Garcia. – [Raul] Okay, thank you. – [Carol] You’re gonna
stay here and talk to us about the book store update. – Yes, okay. So, Madame Chair, Mr.
President, members of the Board, a request for proposals for the management of the Del Mar College
bookstore operations was issued on August 19, 2019, two weeks ago. The college has recently completed the vendor selection process
with a recommendation by unanimous vote by the committee to award the contract
to Texas Book Company. The term of the contract is for two years with five one year extensions
for a maximum of seven years. The estimated commission
for the seven year period is estimated at 2.4 million
dollars for the college, which includes 150,000 signing bonus. The next step is to finalize
the terms and conditions of the contract agreement. From a student affordability
solution perspective, Texas Book Company offers
the sale of used books, book rentals, and book buy back program. In addition, they have an
all inclusive access program which delivers a digital
material eBook solution at a, that can be used with
multiple technology devices. The program is offered through
their strategic partnership with RedShelf and VitalSource. The college also received
proposals from Follett and Barnes & Noble College. Each vendor was assessed
based on their qualifications, the company’s financial health,
textbook cost and price, and operating concepts and
financial considerations. The 11 committee membership
is representative of the college’s governing
body consisting of three executive team leaders
including myself as a chair, four deans, the Office of Financial Aid, the Office of Purchasing, the Office of Information Technology, and a member of our student government. That concludes my report. Any questions? – [Gabriel] Is that the
company that has it right now? – I’m sorry, what was that? – Is that the same company
that has it right now? – That is correct. It’s the same company. Yes sir. – One more question. Can you, you gave us a total of what we’ll get over
five years but what is the percentage more or
less, or, in the contract? – So they guarantee a
minimum of 300,000 a year and so this last past
year I think we earned about close to 290,000. So, we already ahead of the game today. I don’t know if I should have answered that question in public. Now they know our numbers. (laughing) But that’s okay. (laughing) – Any other questions or comments? Yes sir? – I was wondering like for someone, I know we were talking about the books. You know, the bookstore, books. – Yes sir. – But they have other things
there in the bookstore besides the books, right? – Yes, they do have other
merchandising items. Yes sir. – Okay now that merchandise, is that something that
we also have a contract for so many years or what? How does it work? – So the contract is a bundle of services that includes the
merchandising piece of it and so there is a commission
component to that as well. So, those numbers are
included in the figures I quoted you earlier. – So now, if there’s a
company here in Corpus that can beat whatever they have there, any kind of shirts, caps, bags, whatever, that says Del Mar. I mean, how do we know that? When is the deadline for that? Is there gonna be another
time that’s gonna come up that they can make a
presentation to us or whatever? – Yeah so if I understand your question, what you’re asking us is can
we break out the two components which is the book versus the
retail merchandising piece and I guess at the end of
the day, you know, in order, because it is a very
competitive industry, right? And you really need to
bundle all of this together to really get good pricing out there. So if you start separating it, you know, it becomes very difficult
and we may not end up with the commission that we
are currently being quoted on. – And that’s just out of the bookstore. That’s the merchandise
that’s just, I mean, I say just out of the bookstore. It’s not the only merchandiser
that we work with. I don’t know the names offhand but I know that there are other
merchandising companies that have contracts with
us and that are at least on our vending list that we
go out for many other items. Okay, so that’s not the
only source for that. So what I’m saying is if
there’s any other companies out there in the community,
getting on our vendor list and then going after some of the contracts and those types of things. Jay, I know Jay does a
lot of work with that out of public relations office
that is not the bookstore. – Yeah, okay, because
I know that, you know, of course they gotta be on
the vendor list like you say. – Yes sir. – But the fact is that if the merchandise that’s there, here in Corpus, somebody
can beat that big time. I mean, how do we go about it? You know, I mean. – [Mark] So if you’re
talking about the merchandise in the bookstore itself,
okay, so that’s a part of this particular contract. – That goes hand in hand
with the books and all that? – Yeah, it’s all part
of the bigger contract and we leverage that big contract to get the best prices
that we can and then the, the other payments that
they make towards us that we have for, what
do you call ’em, Raul? I’m sorry. – [Raul] So it’s part of the– – Commissions, sorry. – Yeah, it’s part of making it affordable for our students at the end of the day. So definitely want to have a nice, broad selection of merchandise
but at the end of the day the bookstores, or these companies, they’re really leveraging
that additional sales to really give us a better pricing. So, to your point, if
we were to award this to another contract then
my expectation would be that the pricing or the cost of the books is gonna go up for our
students and so at the end of the day, you know, our
strategic vision is really to focus our energy in making
the cost of the tuition for our students more affordable and that includes textbooks. – Used books are what
the students go after. That’s the big bread and butter– – That is. – Opportunity for our
students that they go after to save money. Books are expensive but
we’re doing everything we can to keep that
relationship and then also, looking at the long haul with this company and or just books in general is something that we’re focusing on. And, I’m really trying to stay in touch with what the students’ needs
are so that we can make sure that future contracts are
around what our students are looking for. What we know now is the
students are going after, the vast majority of students
are going after used books from our standpoint and that’s
really what this contract provides for. – Now, the other thing
and this is gonna be the last thing I’m gonna
ask is that the company that’s doing it, where are they from? Are they from another town? – Greenville, Texas. – From where? – Greenville, Texas. – Is that Dallas? – Just outside of Dallas. I know it well. And we’ve been doing business
with them for several years. – [Carol] Any other questions or comments? – I’ve met with the CEO several times. – Thank you, Mr. Garcia. – [Raul] Thank you. – Ms. McDonald is going
to come up and give us our annual review of
professional service contracts. – Yes, thank you. I’ve provided you the list of the professional service
contracts and again, I color coded the list so
that it kinda highlights if there are any changes that
are gonna happen this year. So if it’s highlighted in yellow, that means that contract will
be expiring sometime in 2019. If it’s in orange, that means it has already expired in 2019. There are actually no blue highlights so there were no contract date changes since the last time we reported this. And, I’ll show you the, like,
this time I’m showing you a contract that expired this year. The next time I provide you with a list, that contract will
actually drop off the list. So I’ll show it to you
one time once it’s expired and then it’ll drop off. So if you look at the first section, the actual first page of the list if you wanna go back a page. There’s a highlighted in orange. It was the Johnson Woods
contract that has expired. But if you look right below that, there’s already a new contract in place and that’s our external auditors. Now if you go to the next page, the yellow highlight
shows that the contract with Cleary Zimmermann will
expire at the end of this year. So at the end of December 2019,
that contract will expire. If there is a need for
the college to extend it, there are provisions in it but for now that is the contract expiration date. We go to the next page. It’s also showing you that
the Texas Book Company contract expires. We did issue a one month
extension to carry it through to the end of October but as
Mr. Garcia just mentioned, they are working on
entering into a new contract with the bookstore. And there was one new contract
added since the last time I presented and that would be the contract for phase one on Southside with Fulton. So that’s the only new
addition to the list at this time besides the
Collard Johnson Woods new contract also. Any questions? – Question on the AGCM contract. We just finished 70 million
dollars of construction and we’re just beginning
117 million in construction. That percentage fee that we’re paying them that’s based on the
construction amount, is it not? (coughing drowns out speaker) – [Tammy] I’d have to go back and look at the contract details. – It shows an hourly rate
here, not a percentage. – [Tammy] Yeah, it’s not, I don’t think that one shows a percent. (mumbles) – I’m showing that we’re paying them 4.1% of the contract. Is that correct? – [Carol] Go ahead, Mr. Alfonso. – [Tammy] I need the detail. I don’t have the contract detail with me. – Yeah. You’re talking about, if you calculate the– – Yes, turn on your microphone. – It’s on.
– It’s on. – [Carol] There you go. – [Hector] There’s an hourly rate on mine. – [Tammy] Yeah, there you go. – The contract for AGCM
is stipulated specifically for the ’14 and ’16 bond
and is defined by projects and it’s per hour, per role, and it has a not to exceed value. So it is defined by the amount of estimate of services they’re gonna
provide for independent services. – I’m confused then because
I’ve done some research on those types of contracts
and they’re generally on a sliding scale based on
the value of the contract. And, the projects that I’m looking at, when they exceed 50 million dollars, their percentage is two percent. When they exceed 100 million dollars, the percentage drops to 1.5%. – Ah, that’s not correct. On the contract with AGCM,
it’s on a per hour basis. – I understand that but my question is why is it different than what
I’m finding on my research? – I don’t know what you
have in your hand, sir. – [Carol] Your research
on other contracts? – The general contract management. – [Carol] Okay, yeah. You’re talking about typical. – It is, just through my, it is the, the college went for a
request for proposal, RFQ for construction management and AGCM is a successful responder
and their contract with the college is specifically defined on an agreement between
Del Mar College with AGCM per hour, per role and it’s
not based on percentage. – And, when we sent out that request, was it for the 70 million dollars or was it for the 190 million dollars? – For the, it is
specifically defined based on the funding for the ’14
bond and the funding for the ’16 bond. – Which would be 296 million? – Ah, it depends on the project. For the current contract, for example, for the ’14 bond it’s
specifically defined the role and the project management
and the staffing assigned to the projects
are specifically defined depending on the role per hour basis. – And if there’s a
particular scope of work that is listed in the negotiated contract. So, it’s not open ended for everything. There’s a specific scope of
work that they are to provide. At the college’s request,
we can add additional scopes of work but only if we request it and then they identify
personnel and an hourly rate for those particular type of
functions that we may need for any type of service from that contract
construction management role. But, when it went out it was
for particular scopes of work to assist and services for
projects to do with the bonds that we asked for. It wasn’t for open ended everythings. – [Ed] So hourly and not to exceed? – Yes.
– Hourly not to exceed. And default. – The protection for
the college is the fact that as Tammy said, the
college, if in writing they would have additional projects, we can request them to provide an estimate and they can respond in writing as well and the college can accept or reject. But as it is right now for the ’14 bond and ’16 bond to protect
the college as contract is designed to do so,
we do have stipulations for the ’14 and ’16 bond
on not to exceed amount in both the projects. – Okay so I was not around here when you sent out that request. Was that request for a 70
million dollar contract? – [August] I was not in this role when that request came out too but– – Right (mumbles). – So, yeah. That’s gonna be specific enough that we’ll have to go
back and look that up. – Could I get some history on that because the research that I’m seeing is dramatically different from the 4.1% that we’re paying and I’d like to be able to reconcile the two. – [Mark] We’ll be glad to produce it. – [Man] Where do you see 4.1%? That’s what I don’t understand. – That’s the amount that
AGCM’s been getting paid on the contract so on 100
million dollar contract, they get 4,100,000. – [Man] An hourly rate. – No, they’ve got a 4.1%. – To add details to what
the college has been paying for what AGCM has been invoicing. There are a number of people
assigned to the east and west and depending on their role, they have a different rate per hour and it’s, you know, and
it’s paid as invoice and as incurred. – I printed out the most
recent one from the eBuilder and it calculates out to 4.1%. – But they’re not, are you saying that that’s
what it calculates out but they’re not billing
based on a percentage. They’re billing based on hourly. – Thank you.
– Okay. – Possibly. – They’re billing on an hourly basis. – Thank you. – Any other questions on the professional
services contract report? Thank you. Thank you Ms. McDonald. All right. We will move into our
college president’s report. – Thank you Madame Chair. Really quickly, again, the
U.S. Department of Education has awarded Del Mar College
a 2.8 million dollar grant. We just had the press release
if you were able to be there. Thank you all for those
of who were in attendance. There’s a 2.8 million dollar
grant that will support, again, advising for the college by way of Hispanic serving institution
Title V designated grant. Just really quickly and
I know we talk about this and this is a point that I think we did not bring up earlier, the number of advisors
that we have on this campus is in the hundreds. I wanna make that point
of clarity of something I talked about before. We’re one of the few colleges,
well, let me just say, one of the colleges in the minority that offer, that have a
faculty advising model and yes, we have a relatively good number of advisors right now. We always say we don’t have enough but this grant will enable us
to add more advisors per se. Our combination is a model
that is both centralized, decentralized, and a faculty model. We have the hybrid models. We have all the tools
on the table right now and that’s what our QEP is gonna working to shape up and hone and
provide for our students. That being said,
congratulations to the college on Project Senda for the Title V grant for 2.8 million dollars over five years to support that effort. Timely, could not have
come at a better time. On September 12th, I and Ms. Lenora Keas and I know Chairwoman Scott were at the Gulf Coast Growth
Ventures site tour and groundbreaking ceremony. Regent Averyt was there as well. I remember. It was a great opportunity to go take on and take in that massive complex. It’s just incredible. On the 17th, I attended
as well as many regents. I know Regent Bennett
and others were at the Del Mar Creative and Scholarly Works Expo. I wanna thank all the regents and everyone who was
able to attend that day. It was an opportunity to
celebrate what our faculty and some of other staff members do best and that is express their creative side by way of their works. So, that concludes my report. So I’ll answer any questions you may have. – Any questions for Dr. Escamilla? Seeing none, thank you sir. – You’re welcome. – Under regents reports,
there were a couple of items that I wanted to call your attention to and have an opportunity to discuss. A couple of things. We’ve had a couple of
requests from regents to look at our public comment policy and so there is a draft policy that is there for your review. We have had that vetted
by our college council and we’ll run a couple more traps before it is adopted but
the idea would be that in compliance with both
our policy and state law, we are putting a little
bit more meat to the bones. And in practice, prior
to the start of meetings we’d ask individuals who would
like to address the board to sign a registration card and indicate whether they’re speaking
on a specific item and or general comment. The individuals, if anybody has handouts, they would need to provide
those to our board liaison prior to the start of the meeting. Three minutes for public comments. Individuals cannot yield that, any portion of their time to someone else. And then there’s a section
on rules of decorum and on the provisions for if
somebody violates that decorum. In general, we will look
at doing public comment right after the recognitions
portion of our meeting agenda and limit that time to
no more than 30 minutes. There will be public comment allowed on specific agenda items
before the board takes action on those agenda items,
as has been our practice. And then there is an
opportunity for the board chair to temporarily modify or
suspend the application of those rules if applicable. Are there questions or comments on that? We wanted to give you all
a chance to look at it and absorb it and have discussion and if there are changes
you’d like to see or revisions then we can have that as an action item at our next monthly meeting. – Ms. Carol, I have a question. – Yes? – With number, prior to the
start of a board meeting, what if somebody comes
and they want to speak on a certain item and they’re
running like five minutes late that’s prior to the
start of a board meeting. Can they still? – Yes, I think in practice again the chair will have the prerogative
to allow for that to happen. I think the idea is if
there is a large group of some kind that we
wanna have some ability to understand how the flow of
the meeting is gonna happen before the meeting starts but it would be the prerogative of the chair
of the board to suspend that. – [Elva] To recognize. Okay. – That’s correct.
– To recognize that person. – That’s correct. – [Elva] So it will be possible
for someone running late– – Yes. – [Elva] To be able to speak. Thank you. – Any other questions or comments? If not, then you’ll see
that back as an action item at our next board meeting. The other item that is there
from a direct policy standpoint is directly related to
our board self evaluation from earlier this year. There was specific
language around the board wanting to have a better
process and understanding, have a stated process by
which the board will review its policies on a regular basis. So again, staff has drafted
this for our consideration and it pretty much mirrors
our practice right now. I’m not gonna go through
and read all of that to you but would like to note
that the board B policies are what we’ll be paying
a special attention to and that all board policies as well as administrative
procedures are available online for anyone who wants to access those. There’s going to be,
let’s see, on page 79, you’ll see primary ownership
and secondary ownership of the manual and then
a policy review schedule that lays out over a 10
year period for the board to look at each of the chapters. Chapter one, the board
will actually look at every other year because that’s the one that most directly relates to our work but there will be an
opportunity for the board to have a process by
which they’re looking at all the chapters of the policy manual. And the other thing to understand, this does not preclude
staff from bringing policies forward to us as necessary
either by accreditation, legislation, or practice
that they need the board to consider for amendments. But I think this would, I
think, put in a little bit more structure at what the board
requested our self evaluation on board policy review. – [Gabriel] We’re just
talking about board policy, not A policies? – Yes, correct. This does refer and define A policies and the procedure for that but that is at the college president’s
discretion and through the shared governance
process and other policies that apply to this. – Madame Chair–
– Yes? – Also, the board always has
the initiative, you know, to bring a policy question
for consideration. This doesn’t lock you in
to only considering it when it’s scheduled. – Correct. Thank you for that clarification. – And once again, we
do not have a hard copy policy manual anymore, right? It’s just online. – That’s correct. We do not distribute a
hard copy unless there’s a special request from
someone that needs it and I have, don’t recall
that ever being the case. Do you, Ms. Delia? Anybody ever requesting a hard copy? No. And there’s not a standalone practice or a practice of generating that either. – Any other questions or comments? This will also be on our
agenda then at the next meeting for adoption and if you have
any questions or concerns if you will let me know
or Mr. Rivera as well, that would be helpful. Thank you. And then the last item under
Regent’s report, again, was directly related to
our board self evaluation in wanting to specifically
address opportunities for the board to have
training in the financial, our fiduciary responsibilities. So, a couple of things
to highlight for you. There is a session at the
ACCT annual conference that staff has recommended to us on five year budget modeling,
performance metrics, and board policy. It is being led by Lone Star College. Dr. Stephen Head, their
chancellor, Alton Smith, their board chair, and
Jennifer Mott, their CFO. It’s going to be Thursday,
October 17th at 10:30 AM so staff specifically
recommended that session to us for training if we’d like it. Dr. Escamilla and Ms.
Villareal have arranged for Roland Gilmore, who’s
a senior program director at the coordinating board
to provide specific training for Del Mar College regents. This will be a webinar. You can do it from your
desk at home or at work or if you don’t have access to facilities for a webinar you can come
to the president’s office. That’s going to be on
November 14th at 10 AM. Natalie’s going to send you the details so don’t worry about writing
them down unless you want to but we appreciate the
opportunity for us to learn a little bit more about
the financial indicators that the coordinating board is looking at. And again, this will be led by
a coordinating board director November 14th at 10 AM. And then the last opportunity
for, not last opportunity, the next opportunity for us, Mr. Garcia is actually going to be working with us at our December Board of Regents meeting. I’m not sure if this is going
to be in the regular meeting or as a workshop
beforehand but specifically on those financial
indicators and the new KPIs that are a part of our strategic plan so that we can talk specifically
about how those indicators, what they mean to Del Mar College instead of our specific numbers. So those are three opportunities
specifically related, again, to our board self evaluation that we wanted to bring
up for your attention. – A while back it used to be a requirement of board members,
especially new board members to take a seminar or either watch a video on public investment act. – [Carol] That still is. – It still is? – [Carol] That still is the case. Yes sir. – [Woman] And it’s still awful. – And it’s still awful. (people laughing) Oh. – [Woman] It’s over 20 years old. – Yeah. So, yeah, it’s a video of someone giving an old Power Point presentation. – [Gabriel] Actually, when
I first got on the board they sent us to Austin to do that. Half a day. – So Delia has a copy of that DVD and you can plug it in and watch it. But this is an opportunity
for us to potentially be interactive and so I really
appreciate the things that staff has put together
for us to be interactive and to make sure that we
get our questions answered. And again, directly related
to what the board expressed and is desired for additional
training in that regard. At our next board meeting we
will also have an opportunity under Regent’s reports to
come back and report on what happened at the ACCT conference. So just as an FYI for those
of you who might want to share presentations or share synopsis, we’ll do that at our next meeting under Board of Regents business. Any other questions or comments for that? If not, we’ll move on to pending business. And you will see we’ve lengthened
our pending business list quite a bit. Trumped it to keep track
of comments and questions and referrals and things
that are coming up. So, we’ve got quite a number of things on our agenda today and
you will see in November, we’re targeting a student housing update, a grant management audit,
there is the TIRZ policy and abatement policy review. Our SACS and QEP updates,
eLearning, et cetera. So if you see things on the pending agenda that you have questions about
or if you notice something that is not there that you
thought was gonna be followed up, please let me know and I’ll
make sure that we get that added to our pending list. – [Gabriel] The TIRZ policy
is just policy in general regarding TIRZ, not
specifically North Beach. – Correct, correct. So we’ll have a draft policy
for review in November. Any other questions or comments
about our pending business? Seeing none, we will move
on to our consent agenda. Consent agenda items include a minutes from our August 27th and
September 10th meeting and acceptance of the investments
for September of 2019. Is there a motion to
accept the consent agenda as presented? – [Gabriel] So moved, Madame Chair. – Motion by Mr. Rivas. Is there a second? Second by Dr. Sherwood. Is there any public comment
on our consent agenda? Seeing none, all those in
favor of the consent agenda please say I. – [Board] I. – Any opposed say no. That motion carries. Moving on to our regular agenda. Mr. Garcia is going to give us an update on the quarterly investment report. – Madame Chair, Mr. President,
members of the board, today we have a special
guest that will go over the quarterly investment report and trending financial and
geopolitical activities impacting our yields. Let me introduce you to David Macklewayne from Patterson & Associates. – [Carol] Hello sir. Thank you. Thank you for joining us. Welcome. – Well, thanks for having me and I’m happy to review the investment
portfolio with you guys. It’s been a challenging year
for the financial markets. We’ve seen treasury
yields do an about face from this time last year and
obviously the United States has still been the
strongest economy globally when compared to so many of
the other countries around. Right now our economy seems
to be kind of cooling off a little bit. Some of the statistics that are coming in, we’ve had two months in a row
where our manufacturing levels have declined and the rest of the world is facing serious growth
issues and you can see the little chart here. We’ve got a growing number of countries that actually have negative
yields on their bonds. It’s kind of hard to
conceptually get your eye, you know, your mind around
having a negative yield but there’s so much fear that people are, if they have to buy their country’s debt, they’re actually bidding
the price of that debt up so much that the price
exceeds the interest earnings. And so, the people who
are trading that debt are simply hoping it’ll appreciate further from where they’re purchasing it as a way to make their yield. Fortunately, we don’t have that problem but a number of countries
that can buy U.S. debt have started to flood into our markets and created more demand for,
you know, treasury bills and treasury bonds. So, we’ve got this yield
environment right now that’s been coming down very sharply. We’ve been climbing a wall of worry. We’ve got these tensions with China on trying to strike some
trade deals with them and, you know, the longer
that the uncertainty persists, you know, we’re seeing people cut back on their capital spending budgets, which is causing our economic data to gradually contract here. So, you know, there’s
the potential that maybe some of this can go away if we can find some friendlier terms with China but until we do reach that
point, we’ve got Brexit as another potential catalyst to create a little more fear in the debt markets and a little more demand
for those products. The one thing that has
remained somewhat healthy is consumer spending here has, again, kind of carried the torch
for the U.S. economy and, you know, hopefully that
will continue to be the case but I think as long as
this unemployment rate doesn’t start to increase, we’ll probably be on solid footing. As you know, the Federal
Reserve has reversed course. In November of last year,
the markets were anticipating that the Fed was probably
gonna raise interest rates a couple more times and
they did raise, in fact, in December but they dramatically
altered their language to say that they were now
gonna monitor the data and the markets eventually kind
of flipped to the other side and we saw yields start
to go down in advance of the FOMC actually making
their first rate cuts. So now we’ve had back to back rate cuts. We just cut 25 basis points last month. That’s having an immediate
impact on money market funds and pooled funds and,
you know, to the extent that we need liquidity for all
your construction projects, you know, we do have a healthy balance in the overnight pools
to meet the ever changing liquidity needs here but we’ve
also extended the duration as we get to those portfolios. Right now, there’s about five
members of the Federal Reserve that think that no more
rate cuts are needed but the other seven are
leaning towards an additional rate cut before the end of the year. So, as you can kinda see, that’s almost a 50, 50 proposition there. And then, once again, the
treasury yields have gone from last November we were
teetering around a three percent on a two year treasury yield. This morning, as we
speak, or this afternoon, the two year treasury yield is a 145. A 10 year treasury yield is a 155 and we’re still remain
inverted from a, you know, say a three month T-bill
down to a five year yield. It declines down and
then it starts to finally raise back up between five and 10 years. So again, dealing with
an inverted yield curve kind of makes our job a
little more challenging but we’ve still been able
to find good opportunities for Del Mar College and
buying agency callables to give us good spreads
over the treasury yields. We’ve been utilizing
commercial paper investments for our short term needs
and we keep a nice ladder of commercial paper for those maturities. You know, 90 to 180 days. As far as the portfolio currently, you can see that we still have between the construction funds, there’s two pretty large chunks here between the A and the B 2018. We’ve got about five percent remaining between the ’16 and ’17 bond funds. And, you know, the total composition there is about 67% in bond funds. Well, not quite. About 63% in construction funds with the remaining 37%
being in the other funds, predominately your general funds. This overview that we have
right here is your pooled funds or your general funds. I’d just like to kind of
look at the far right column where we were last August. The book value when we closed out August, the market value was around
66 and a half million. The yield on the portfolio
at that time was at 218 and the average yield of a
six month T-bill at that time was at 217. The interest earnings in that
quarter last year was 483,000. So as we skip forward, we
can see our balance here highlighted in yellow. We finished this August with
about five million dollars more than total balance. We extended that weighted average maturity about double from 54 days to 103 days. And the yield of the
portfolios was closing out at a 239 comparing to a
six month T-bill at a 206. Saw we had a nice spread over
your treasury alternatives and you can see that we
earned about $90,000 more in August of ’19 versus August of ’18. The total earnings for the year
came in at about 2.1 million on your general funds. And then as we look at the
breakdown comparing them in August of this year
versus the previous quarter, you know, there wasn’t a
whole lot of net change other than the fact that
yields have been coming down as we’ve described. So, in May to August we
saw that the average yield on the agencies in the portfolio
went from a 255 to a 240. The pools dropped from a 255 to a 233, pretty consistent across the board. And then this bank CD
is really insignificant. It’s a very small
checking account balance. The commercial paper yield
was a 275, dropped to a 270 and now that’s way down
following the treasuries. And, the sweep funds,
which are a combination of your pool rates, you
continue to see these kind of ratchet down. The non-general funds,
those two, the bond funds that we talked about,
the majority of those being centered around the 2018 A and B. Again, we’ve seen some
spend down in those funds. In August of 2018 you had a market value of just under 155 million. We finished this August
just over 121 million. So, net of interest earnings
we’ve spent at least 35 million of construction
funds over the past year. You can also see that the
average yield on the portfolio last August was at 217. We closed at a 246 there,
which was a nice pick up over the treasury benchmark comparison. About 40 basis points. We also had about double
the amount of interest in August of ’19 versus August of ’18, about 380,000 there to
780,000 here this August. And the total earnings
on the construction funds was almost three and a
half million dollars. So, to the extent that we
partnered up with you guys, we’ve remained proactive
in trying to determine your spending needs and trying to leverage the portfolio with those investments that kind of give you the
maximum earnings potential. But, with safety and liquidity always being highly emphasized. That just about does it here. Again, just comparing how
the allocations ended here for the funds and the
corresponding yields. So, it looks very similar
to what we looked at for the general fund. So, if there was any
questions, I’ll take ’em now. – You didn’t talk very much or mention anything about tariffs. How is that affecting our economy and particularly things like steel prices that we need in new construction? – Yeah, well, it’s definitely affecting, it’s affecting a lot of different areas besides construction. You know, a lot of people
are just kinda pulling in to monitor, you know? They’re not stockpiling obviously. Or, there was some stockpiling
of certain commodities in anticipation of
maybe having to spend up through the tariffs that
maybe we’re gonna be imposed. You know, it’s been this
back and forth, right? Push and pull where
we’ve taken tariffs off, we’ve put ’em back on. So, there’s just a lot of uncertainty. The bottom line is, you know, I think we still have solid footing here but a lot of people are
kind of maybe reducing their desire to spend not
knowing what it’s gonna look like until we’ve reached a final agreement. But, you know, I look around
here driving into town and clearly there’s a boom going on here in the city of Corpus Christi
and I think that’s true of a lot of our port
cities because, you know, being a consumer economy,
there’s a huge number of goods coming off these
ships and, you know, gas and oil that’s gotta
get out of these pipelines and onto ships so. It’s still gonna be volatile
but eventually I think that America is gonna come out shining. – What would make it
stabilize a little bit more? Change in administration or? (people laughing) After 2020? – You know, I don’t know that, you still, you know, a lot of what’s
going on with China obviously has been, you know, China’s
kind of had their way with, it’s been a little more one sided as far as trade goes for them. You know, there’s a lot of
things that don’t necessarily show up where, you know,
certain goods and services that they import over
here are cloning a lot of U.S. technology and
they’re kinda cutting corners and all that stuff is, you know,
dollars leaving our economy and going back over there. And that’s stuff that’s
really off the radar. So I think a lot of what’s
going on with these trade talks is trying to draw a little
harder line in the sand and, you know, you know
as well as I do that, you know, this could worsen
and it could get better. I just really, I think
it hinges on, you know, I don’t think the Chinese
kind of think the same way that the Western world does. I think, you know, they
still have a distinct way. – If he had a crystal ball
and answer to that question he probably wouldn’t be
standing in front of us. (people laughing) – Yeah, yeah. You know, if I could just
throw a big ball of money at it knowing that I had the answer. But, like I said, I
think we’re just trying to get to a point where, the guys who are really
producing, you know, leading edge stuff here, you
know, technological advances, that they’re not being
pirated and ultimately the job creation that
comes out of, you know, these various areas of
strength in the U.S. economy. You know, that we’ve got
to kind of safe guard that because I think a lot of,
and we’ve been talking about y’all’s trends
and not just enrollment but I think the trend in the future is very technology oriented. The types of jobs that
are gonna be available for the kids coming out now, there’s definitely a tech bias to them because of the amount of
advances going on there. Artificial intelligence,
it’s off the charts crazy what’s going on. – Great. One question on bank CDs. Is that rate correct, .2%? – [David] What’s that? – On the bank CD rate. It says August .2%. – [David] Yeah, that’s
not an actual CD rate. That’s like a, those were like
a checking demand account. – Okay. – [David] I think we just
miscatergorized in there. – It’s horrible. – [David] Yeah, it is actually. That’s not where CD rates are. – Okay. – CD rates are more in
line with treasury rates. – [Ed] That answers it. – But it was categorized incorrectly. That was a checking account
sweep and that was on that so. – [Ed] Thank you. – [David] Okay, thank y’all. – Thank you sir. We need a motion to accept
that investment report. Is there a motion to accept? Mr. Bennett makes the motion. Mr. Salinas seconds it. Any discussion on that motion? Is there any public comment on the motion to accept the college’s
quarterly investment report? Seeing no public comment,
all those in favor, please say I. – [Board] I. – Any opposed, please say no. That motion carries. Now we’re going to hear,
have some discussion and possible action related to
our 2020 internal audit plan and the 2019 internal audit report. Ms. McDonald. – Yes, thank you. Dan Graves, a partner
with Weaver is here today to present our fiscal year
2020 internal audit plan and our fiscal year 2019
annual internal audit report. That annual internal audit report, we are required to submit that report to the state auditor’s
office by November first. So for your review and acceptance, I’ll let Dan go ahead and (mumbles). – Good afternoon. I do have a very short
presentation for you today compared to the other ones we’ve given. (Carol laughs) (Dan laughs) The 2019 internal audit report and as part of the 2019 internal audit report, the 2020 internal audit plan. Just some quick refreshers and reminders. This is a report that we submit annually. The 2019 internal audit report
is due by November first to the state auditor’s
office, the Governor’s office budget and policy division as well as the legislative budget board. And so, it is a report over
internal audit activity for the 2019 fiscal year. And the format of the report is prescribed by the state auditor’s office. They provide new guidance
every year about August first and based on that guidance,
you’ll see the sections here in our presentation
of what is required. The first section is a requirement with Texas government code 2102.015, which is the publishing of the
annual internal audit report on the entity’s website. And so, that has to be
done by November first or within 30 days of the
governing body’s approval. It contains the internal
audit plan for fiscal year ’19 and the results of that plan. Also, any consulting or non-audit services that are provided by the
internal audit function. The external quality assurance review of the internal audit
function and so you’ll see our peer review report for our
firm in that report as well. You’ll see the 2020 fiscal
year plan for internal audit. You’ll also see any
external audit services performed for the college
and then disclosure on the method that the
college has for reporting and reviewing suspected
fraud, waste, and abuse. So those are the four, or sorry, those are the elements of the report. With that, the one element
that you haven’t seen is our 2020 internal audit plan. And so, as part of that you’ve seen each one of the reports
as we finalize those for the 2019 annual audit plan. The 2020 audit plan does
have a large portion of that report and you’ll see in that 2020 internal audit
plan that we’ve reviewed and coordinated with
management that there are internal audit and consulting
projects planned for 2020. One of those is over grants management. There’s also a special projects area that we can provide special
projects and special audits as requested and
coordinated with management. Then we also have several
internal audit follow ups. Two of those for student
services and grant management are the follow ups over
the internal audit findings from our 2019 plan. And then you’ll see we
have a few other audits, about six that are from prior
years where there’s one to, anywhere between one and
four items from those audits that need to be followed
up on from prior findings. So that is my presentation. I don’t have a whole lot
because of those two items. This is a housekeeping report that is, you know, as
Tammy said, required by the Texas Internal Audit
Act and with approval we can then submit that
to the governing agencies and oversight agencies
and then provide that to the college to post on the website. Do we have any questions over
the content of the report or the 2020 plan? – [Ed] Question about
the special projects. – Yes? – [Ed] Who would request that? – That would be requested
through college management. So, if the board had anything
that needed to be looked at that would go through Dr.
Escamilla and then to us for a special project based
on the available budget for the internal audit plan. – [Ed] Who do the internal
auditors report to? – [Dan] We, by our charter,
report to the board through Dr. Escamilla according to the internal audit charter. – Thank you. – Are there other questions or comments? We do need an action to adopt
the 2019 internal audit report including the 2020 internal audit plan. Is there a motion to? Ms. Hutchinson makes that motion. Ms. Estrada makes a second. Any other comments or
questions from regents? Is there any public comment on this item? Seeing none, all those
in favor, please say I. – [Board] I. – Any opposed, please say no. That motion carries. Thank you very much. – [Dan] Thank you. – Mr. Garcia’s gonna come back and give us our quarterly financial report. – Okay, minor technical difficulties there but I think we’re there. (laughing) All right, Madame Chair, Mr. President, and members of the Board of Regents. We’re gonna first talk about
the new revenues category which is all these different
components right here. In general, total revenues
are within the planned budget. Mostly and this revenue
came in better than expected relative to the planned
budget due to improved yields on our investments as presented by our earlier special guest. The tuition and fee revenues also came in better than expected than
relative to the planned budget due to increased enrollment
and our continuing education and corporate contract services. Moving on to expenditures. This category right here. In general, total expenditures
is below the planned budget mainly driven by salient benefit cost. The next item is the unspent
contingency of 1.9 million for a total of 6.4 net income for the period ending August 31st. Just keep in mind that we
still are in audit mode. The audit has not been
completed so there may be some adjustment moving
forward but more to come once we conclude the audit process. Let’s move onto the balance sheet. Okay. The balance sheet, same amount of cash. Cash is king I always say. From our bond holders and
creditor’s perspective, the college’s balance is stronger, balance sheet is stronger
from the 12 months ago. This is mainly attributed
to the changing cash and investments of about
seven million dollars. And then also for the fund balance, a total of 6.4 million just right here. The increase in our
accounts payable right here is attributed to the increase
in year end expenditures. That includes capital
equipment for our workforce and continuing education programs. I also want to add specifically on our overall revenue balance,
the increase, I’m sorry. I spoke to Dave Gordon about
two or three weeks ago. Dave Gordon from Estrada
Hinojosa & Company. He described our bonds as investment grade due to its high ratings
of AA2 from Moody’s and double A two plus, AA+ from Fitch show it’s high ranking. You know, credit wording that says a lot about how we manage
our financial statement and the strength of our
balance sheet as well. Madame Chair, Mr. President,
and members of the board, that concludes my presentation. – Thank you Mr. Garcia. Are there questions or
comments for Mr. Garcia? Mr. Bennett? – [Ed] One question. – [Raul] Yes sir. – Equipment expenditure, 4.8 million, budget 1.776. How’d that happen? – How’d that happen? So, we have some great things
are happening at the college. This whole capital
campaign that we’re doing, the workforce being one of ’em. We did buy some major equipment
and Lenora, I’m sorry, I’m gonna ask you to talk
about some of the wonderful equipment that we purchased at year end and how that’s gonna
make our program a little bit more robust and more marketable. Or make our students’ skillsets a little bit more marketable. – Thank you. Some of this has been carried
over and it’s a timing piece in that a lot of this has gone
into a variety of programs. I think Chuck McKinney, Chuck’s not here. A lot of this came out from
under his division actually where they were able to go in and purchase some things that were
needed that were aged out and they’ve identified quite a few things, some in mill right,
welding, different products. We’ve been very fortunate
and received right at five million dollars
approximately in gifts, donations that are buying other equipment that’s going into the
Workforce Development Center. So you’re seeing things gear
up for these new buildings, for the Emergent Technology building and the Workforce Development Center. Also, there’s been some
replacement in a variety of programs across campus. So it’s identified need
of obsolescent equipment and then also new
opportunities are needed. – So it’s all instructional equipment. Again, just trying to make sure that we have the appropriate equipment to properly train our
students and make ’em ready for the workforce. – [Carol] Follow up question? – We transferred some
money out of the plant fund and bought equipment
through the 2014 bond fund. I thought that was about
six million dollars. – [Raul] I’m sorry, did we buy some? I don’t recall that. – Remember? We transferred it out of the plant fund. – We designated some, about
five million dollars for ERP. Is that what you’re talking about? – [Ed] I’m not sure. – Yeah, it was for the ERP. – [Carol] Not this type of equipment. – But not out of the ’14 bond. No, no, no. Not out of the ’14 bond. What you’re talking, okay,
this is what you and I were chatting about the other day I think? – [Ed] Yes. – Okay, okay. So, no, what happened was out of the plant fund, no. So it’s the ERP and the ’14 bond and what happened was we
had plant fund dollars originally designated for FF and E. And then when the ’14 bonds
came in way under as they did we asked the board to use those dollars to buy the FF and E
because of those low prices on the ’14 bond to free up those dollars in the plant fund for the FF and E. – For the ERP.
– For the ERP. – [Carol] For the ERP, yeah. Yeah. – I’m sorry. I’m getting all my acronyms messed up. – [Carol] For the new
software system, new computer. Mainframe system. – Yeah, so we freed up
the plant fund for the ERP and that’s what it’s being paid out of. – [Ed] Okay, so that’s
totally unrelated to this? – Yes sir.
– Yes sir. – So, and these dollars,
what we knew going into the budget year,
the requests going into this budget year were lean, at best. The budgets, everybody
was asking for equipment on the front end and so
forth and we were just kinda holding on tight and I
told everybody, I said, wait till mid year, wait till mid year and then we would go and sweep
other accounts if we could, individually I mean. It was a project by project
basis and then I said, ask, let’s get through the base year fund, all the instruction
first and then if need be we would go and pick and bolster
up those equipment accounts to buy the necessary equipment. There was several areas of equipment, science and industrial equipment, that we picked out individually. But I had everybody on that front end, they were asking for all
that money on the front end and I said, no. Wait until we see what’s not
expended in various accounts for that particular year and
then we would fund it that way. – [Ed] Are we unrelated to this? Are we gonna get a detailed
analysis in that 2014 bond fund? – So you’ve asked me for that. I’ve got the note in to August right now. I have not gotten, are you all talking? So we’re coordinating
that detailed analysis that you’re looking for. – [Ed] Okay and this is the
year end statement, is it not? – So this is for the 12
months ending August 31st. As I mentioned before,
we’re still in audit mode and that process will not be
completed, I’m estimating, around the November, December timeframe. We’re coming in and probably delivering the final audit product. – When do you get your unfunded
pension liability entry? – So we’re still waiting on that number. We had some preliminary
numbers and that’s still being vetted out at the state level but last year we came
in at about 1.9 million in expenses if that helps. – [Ed] It does. Thank you. – Yup. – Mr. Garcia, I have a question for you. – Yeah. – My questions are not as
complicated as Mr. Bennett’s. (people laughing) – Thank you (laughing). – Mine are very simple. No, I needed to ask you. Give me an example of
non-faculty stipends. – I’ll give you examples. Well, that’s a good question. – [Lenora] I can do that. – Yes, thank you. – Non faculty stipends is easily, sometimes in the, particularly
in corporate services area or the continuing education
area, those are not classified as faculty. They are instructional though
and they receive stipends for doing additional
work such as, you know, it could be product development. It could be a variety of things where they’re doing additional
work and so it’s a stipend. It’s a pay that’s above and
beyond their normal pay. – It’s compensation
incentive for the added work. – Okay. Thank you. I have another one. I think it’s page eight. You have a check listed
for $618.75 made out to Jason’s Deli and it says
it’s for office supplies. Instructional supplies, office supplies. – Yeah, very good question. Oh my God. (Elva laughs) So, what that is it’s a
grant funded expenditure and what we had a tax educational program that was rolled out and
participants were served a lunch as part of their fee. And so, unfortunately this is a, we recently found out
that that was an error and we need to re-classify it as probably travel and expenses. So, I think that as of the
end of the business days that should be re-classified
to the appropriate category. – Okay and one final question. Checks that are not made out anybody. – Yes so those checks, we intentionally not disclose that for confidentiality purpose. These are payments to
students and to employees. You know, this is the kind
of thing that I would look just to figure out
what, how my daughter’s, whether or not my
daughter’s getting a refund. You know, so, but it’s
hard for me to assess that because the information’s not there. That’s what it is. It’s just confidential information. – Thank you. – [Raul] Yes, mmm hmm. – Other questions or comments? Is there a motion to accept the college’s quarterly financial report? – [Gabriel] Move to accept that. – Mr. Rivas makes the motion to accept. Mr. Bennett seconds. Any discussion? Is there any public comment on this item. Seeing none, all those
in favor please say I. – [Board] I. – Any opposed, please say no. Motion carries. Thank you Mr. Garcia.
– Thank you. – Ms. McDonald and Dr.
Beth Lewis discussion possible action related
to B policy revisions and a notification of
A procedural revisions. – Yes, thank you. This particular section is
gonna have several moving parts. A lot of the policy
revisions do fall under Dr. Lewis’s area but there are some other exec team members that will
also, if you have questions, may participate if you have any
questions on policy changes. So, as we’ve talked about
before this is continued work through our SACS reformation
to better clarify and align our policies
with SACSCOC standards. When we do submit our report, then that report will include documents such as policies as
evidence that will support the SACSCOC report. So there are revisions
to B4.1.1, cash reserves. So I’m gonna go ahead and let Mr. Garcia, if you have any questions,
’cause I think it’s up first on the list as a policy revision. If you have any questions on that. Then we’ll move into Dr. Lewis’s. There’s quite a few in
chapter six, faculty, which Dr. Lewis will cover for you. So, B4.1.1 cash reserves. That policy, it should be the first policy
revision right after the– – [Carol] Page 190. Any questions on the cash reserves? – [Tammy] It’s cash reserves. We’re changing it from,
instead of fund balance we’re changing the title to cash reserves and then changing
unrestricted cash reserve in place of operating fund balance level. So, like I said, if you
have any questions for that Dr. Garcia can answer those for you. – [Carol] I don’t see
any questions, thank you. – [Raul] That would be Mr. Garcia. I have not heard of that title. I’m sorry.
– I’m sorry. (people laughing) – [Raul] Thank you, yeah. Thank you. – You may continue. Thank you. – Okay. And, you also see on the tracking form that the policies have gone through our governance process and were submitted through councils and requested input. So, you do see that also
on your tracking form. So I’m gonna go ahead and turn chapter six over to Dr. Lewis so
that she can go through the policy revisions. – [Ed] Let me understand. These changes are mainly to satisfy SACS? – Yes, many of them are
either because SACSCOC has said you now must have
a policy that addresses this or quite frankly, it’s been a while since we’ve looked at some of our policies and the language is no longer appropriate. – Because of the things
we’re looking at for SACS, we’re bringing it up to speed. SACS is very prescriptive and
I think more than ever before in my experience and
so we’re meeting things to prepare for that 10 year submission that’ll be submitted
in March of next year. – Okay. So, all of the B sixes at the top are simply defining terms and clarifying. We used to say teachers,
counselors, or librarians and all of that has
been changed to faculty. We no longer have counselor faculty and our librarians are
still considered faculty but it’s easier to do
one group term of faculty and then the definition
of ranked and unranked. On B6.3, the fundamental
responsibilities as listed there. And stop me if you have any questions otherwise I’m just gonna plow
through this fairly quickly. Flipping over to B6.5.5.1.1, the evaluation of adjunct faculty. We did not have a requirement
for adjunct faculty. Some of the departments chose to do it but there was nothing in our policy manual that required us to
evaluate adjunct faculty. SACSCOC says now, yes,
you have to have a policy and you have to evaluate
your adjunct faculty and so the process is outlined there. Let me see if there’s
anything else that is very large. One of the questions, and
I’m gonna jump over to under B6.18 on faculty recruitment. – [Carol] If you can wait till
we catch up on a page number. – [Beth] Sure, I’m so sorry. – [Carol] That’s all right. (laughing) – [Beth] I see this, in my
dreams, I see these words in my dreams now so. Yes ma’am? – [Elva] You don’t have to go back but I, this thing is, this
surface is out of battery but I have a note here that
says that adjunct faculty, if no observations are
made I think I heard you just say that you have to, that is required, but if
no observations are made they can use other
criteria to evaluate them. – [Beth] An evaluation has to be made, not necessarily an observation. So if an online faculty member is teaching exclusively online, there’s nothing to observe
and so they would look at other mechanisms. – [Elva] Okay, thank you. – [Beth] Okay. And jumping over to B6.18
there on recruitment, I know this is an A policy
but in case anyone has any questions about
it, I do wanna clarify. Under A6.18.1, one of the
things that we clarified is that SACSCOC used to be very specific and they would say that
the minimum qualification that had to be met was a masters degree and 18 graduate hours in
the teaching discipline. They no longer say that. They make it very clear
that it is incumbent upon the institution
to prove qualifications for faculty members and so
we don’t wanna be locked into something, one, that’s no longer valid and two, that doesn’t
give us the flexibility. So what we have added is
we’ve altered the language a little bit to say the criteria
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Commission on Colleges, which is usually a masters degree with 18 graduate semester
hours in the teaching field or a masters degree with a
major in the teaching field. However, other types of
qualifications may prove to be appropriate as
verified and documented. Okay? So, just in case you’re wondering, what in the world would that be? The example I always give when
I’m doing training on this is that if John Grisham
retired to Port Aransas and wanted to teach English for us, under the old standards he
wouldn’t be eligible to do that because he doesn’t have a
masters degree in English but I think we could all
argue that John Grisham probably knows what he’s doing
when he’s teaching writing. So, that would allow us to hire someone who had extraordinary
skills and accomplishments in the field but didn’t necessarily
have the masters degree. – Then we have examples that
are not quite John Grisham. – [Beth] Right. – Locally and we have faculty
that teach in other areas because of expertise
demonstrated and so forth. It is finally SACS is
getting and documenting this flexibility that
has been their intention for decades– – [Beth] Right. – But finally they’re
giving us the capacity. Again, the onus is on us. – Yes. And it is meant to be used fairly rarely. It’s not something that is a go to. We always wanna have, as much as possible, we wanna have the academic preparation but if someone has extraordinary
preparation and skills and not the degree, we
could certainly make a case for that person. And I believe that that is, yes, I think that that is all we have on the B policies regarding faculty, with the exception of the last one. This is a new policy. B7.29.4. And this is one of those that, this has always been SACS’s position and we’ve always done this but we’ve never had a policy on it which is sort of surprising. So, yeah, it’s, yeah, B7, I’m sorry. B79.4, which simply
states that any student graduating from Del
Mar College has to earn at least 25% of their
work at Del Mar College. So they would not be able
to transfer everything in and get a degree from us. Questions? – Any questions or comments
related to these revisions? Seeing none, is there a motion to accept the B policy revisions? – [Woman] I think we
haven’t done because– – [Tammy] There’s two more. – Oh, I’m so sorry. – Yeah. There’s two more that actually
are in Dr. Silva’s area for student services
for review B7 policies. – [Carol] Hold that motion, Dr. Adame. (laughing) – Please, I’m sorry. Just in case there were
questions on those two areas. – [Carol] Absolutely, please. I’m so sorry. – Excuse me. That’s okay. Any questions from what
Dr. Lewis presented? No? Then we’ll move to– – [Ed] Just one question,
on the student evaluations, who gets to see those? – [Beth] So certainly the
faculty member, their chair and then when that faculty member goes up for promotion or for tenure,
ultimately I see them also. The dean also sees them, their dean. So all the way up the chain. – [Ed] But not the students. – [Beth] The students
do not, at this point, get to see the student evaluations
of that faculty member. That is something that as
we transition to the new ERP we wanna make sure that we
have a mechanism in place for that but it is a fairly complex and complicated process
for us to do right now knowing that our ERP right now, whatever we built would be going away. So, we wanna make sure
that we have some sort of mechanism for that in future and we’re working on that. – [Carol] Thank you, Dr. Lewis. – Okay, thank you. We’ll go back to the section that’s B7.12. It’s the student complaint policy. I think Vince is taking
us back to that page. I’m just gonna kind of
go through the B parts. Under B7.12, the student complaint policy, there’s a paragraph that is
added to the board section which there will be no
retaliation, interference, or harassment toward any
party to a complaint. Should a complainant
or a witness experience any reprisal or retaliation,
then it tells ’em who and how they should report it. So that is an addition to the B section. There are some changes to the A procedures and it’s to better, we’re trying to be consistent. Some policies from years ago, we might of had a work day. It could say calendar days. We’re all trying to move to business days so as we go through the policies, we’re changing the
timelines to business days. So we changed this one from
work day to business day and defined that. We also added a few more days. It had five working days. We changed it to 15 business days. It was quite difficult
on one of our processes to get something turned
around in five days because of schedules and other things so we gave a little more
time for some of the steps to have a little bit more time to respond. That’s in one of the A sections. And a lot of the A procedures reflect what we’re currently doing
it’s just add a little bit more information so
that people understand a little bit better what
that process entails. And so, if you look at the A sections, those are pretty much
what those changes are as to go ahead and put in place what the current practices are. And I believe that’s all of the, for that particular policy would be 7.12. That’s all of the, the first paragraph was all of the B changes. The rest are the A procedure changes. So if you have any
questions, I can answer those or Dr. Silva could help answer the questions for that policy. – [Ed] The 15 days, is
that gonna be consistent for all the complaints now? – No. We look at the type of the complaint and we also look at how many steps and who all could be involved. So it just depends on the
type of the complaint, who’s involved, where does it have to go and so we look at that. So we don’t have one set
time period for any complaint you have five days or 10 days. We look at the type of
complaint and who’s involved. – [Ed] When I read
through the policy manual, it’s confusing to me and
I’m not subjected to it. So I’m wondering how the faculty knows what the timeframe is. – Well no, this is on the
student complaint section but they go to the policy
and it will tell them and they’re notified if
anyone’s involved in a process that this particular process is in place and they get a copy of the policy saying this is the policy
we’re gonna follow. So if they go to the
step that says you have five business days or 10
business days or 15 business days from the date of complaint
or the date of receipt. So it’s in policy, whatever policy they have
filed something under or they are given to follow. They follow the policy that they’re under. – [Ed] Okay. So what are the consequences
if they miss the deadline? – Well, it just depends
on what type of policy or complaint that it is. Some of ’em could be
if you miss a deadline then all action stops. Some of it could be if you miss a deadline it could skip to the next step. So, you know, there’s so
many different processes that we have in place and
all different policies. Not just student bu
also employee processes. It’s all spelled out in policy though. It tells you if you miss a deadline then this is what will happen. It is in policy though. – [Ed] And if administration
misses a deadline, what are the consequences then? – It’s spelled out in policy and remember these are
administrative processes. They are not legal
deadlines as far as you have to file something with the
court by a certain day. They’re administrative steps. There could be extenuating circumstances. You know, we’ve had quite a
few extenuating circumstances that have happened if a particular
step has to be extended. It doesn’t mean you’ve missed a deadline. It could be an extension
that’s requested for any type and usually both parties can request, any party to a complaint can
request an extension of time due to certain circumstances. – [Ed] Thank you. – [Tammy] You’re welcome. – Other questions? Any other catch-all questions? Anybody else to present? – One more. We have one more policy. It’s B7.13, it’s standards
of student conduct. And there are, I think it was under the third page. There are a few sections that were added under the B sections. So like I said, this is
about student conduct and we added failure to
comply with established Del Mar College board policies and or our administrative procedures. So that’s one of the
reasons that you could fall under student conduct. If you don’t follow
policies or procedures, you could be subject to discipline
or under student conduct. So, under admonishment, we kind
of just added some clarity. You can be admonished with our without educational counseling sessions specific to the breach of the conduct. We just added a little
bit more clarification, like I said, on the
practices that we’re doing or that the student
services office is doing. They just wanted to make
sure it was a little more spelt out and a little clearer
on what they were actually, the process that they were following. And then on loss of privileges, they kinda wanted to spell
out a few of those examples of loss of privileges
if a student was under a particular conduct issue so they added four specific loss of privileges examples. We also added additional sanctions may be imposed as warranted. So maybe these aren’t all the sanctions because you can’t name
everything so you also wanna make sure you can impose
others if it’s warranted. So that’s a B section. And again, we changed calendar
days to business days, trying to be consistent with
the business day language. And, under another process, they just wanted to make
sure that they added some clarity on if a student is within a discipline process then
part of that procedure could have a representative or not and what role would
that representative play in that particular hearing or procedure. And it’s the practice that
they’ve been conducted. It’s just we wanted to make sure it was a little more clear in the policy. And those are A sections. So I think that covers
that particular policy for standards of student conduct policy. – [Carol] Okay. – That is it, yes ma’am. – Thank you. (people laughing) She keeps on rolling ’em out there. (people laughing) Dr. Adame made a motion to accept earlier. Is your motion still valid, sir? – Can it be? (people laughing) – I’ll second it. – There’s a motion by Dr. Adame. A second by Mr. Rivas. Are there any other board
comments or questions about these policy revisions? Is there any public comment related to these policy revisions? Yes sir? – Good afternoon. My name is Jim Klein. I teach in the social sciences department. Regarding the evaluation
of adjunct instructors I think that this is really
long overdue at the college. I would just add though that I think, especially in the larger
departments like social sciences or English and philosophy
that adding this now is gonna dramatically
increase the workload for department chairs, especially in those larger departments and I think that there should
be some consideration given to additional compensation
for that additional workload. Thank you. – Thank you sir. Anyone else for public comment? Seeing none, there’s
a motion on the table. All those in favor of
these policy revisions, please say I. – [Board] I. – Any opposed say no. That motion carries. Thank you all very much. We are now going to go to
general public comment. Do we have? – [Man] Yes. – Thank you. Thank you sir. Mr. Jack Gordy. – Yes, I’m Jack Gordy
and I live at 4118 Bree and I’m here to talk about something that happened April the 10th, 45 minutes before the
Board of Regents meeting. 45 minutes before. Okay. There was a staff member
sitting there by his self. Nobody was talking to him. He was by his self and I walked over and started talking to him. I was not harassing anyone. I wasn’t causing any kind of trouble and I wasn’t interfering with anything. And what does the president do? Come walking to where
I was at and he said, you can’t talk to the staff. If you got anything to say,
wait till public comment. Now I could understand it if I was causing some kind of a problem but I wasn’t and when I got ready to leave, you people went into closed
session and I walked outside and a staff member motioned
for me to come over to where he was at and I walked over and started talking to him. And here comes the police
officer reporting the same thing that the president said. You can’t talk to the staff. If you’ve got anything to
say, you should have said it during public comment. That’s a bunch of nonsense. That’s interfering with
public speech, private speech. I wasn’t interfering with anybody. Like I said, I didn’t harass anybody. I didn’t cause any trouble and I didn’t interfere with anything. I’d like for somebody, I don’t care who, to tell me why people
can’t talk to the staff. Now I could understand, like I said, if it was interrupting
something but when it’s not, that don’t even make any sense. Somebody needs to send
him back to training and let him know, he sent
me a copy of the policy and the policy says, if you’re not, you can’t interfere with anything. You can’t cause an harassment
and you can’t cause a problem and I wasn’t doing any of that. So it don’t make no sense at all. Somebody needs to talk to the president and get him straightened out. – Thank you Mr. Gordy. Mr. Klein, did you wanna speak again in general public comment? – Thank you for your time. Again, my name is Jim Klein. I’m with the local chapter here, the American Association
of University Professors. I just wanna take a
moment to introduce you to Professor Keshua Strite Ruiz, who is the new incoming
president of the local chapter of the AAUP. I just wanted to say that
I have every confidence that Keshua will uphold
the professional standards of the AAUP that have become
the norm in higher education throughout the United States
over the past century, particularly as they
pertain to academic freedom, the idea that the classroom
instructor or researcher should pursue their work
without influence from others and shared governance. The idea that the faculty
should join the administration and governing and create
a tripod of leadership at the college or university. I’ll continue to work with the AAUP in support of Keshua’s
initiatives in these areas. Thank you. – [Carol] Thank you. Ms. Ruiz, you have also
signed up to speak. Would you also like to say a few words? – No. Just hello and looking
forward to working with you. Thank you. – Thank you very much. Anyone else for general public comment? If not then the board will
enter into closed session under Texas Government Code 551.071 regarding pending or
contemplated litigation or a settlement offer
with possible discussion and action in open session and the seeking of legal advice from
counsel on pending legal or contemplated matters or claims with possible discussion
and action in open session. Also under Texas Government Code 551.072, regarding the purchase, exchange, lease or value of rural property
with a possible discussion and action in open session and under Texas Government Code 551.073, regarding the deliberation
of a prospective gift or donation with possible
discussion or action in open session. The time is 3:10 PM. We’ll take a five minute recess. (gentle acoustic music) From closed session at 3:33 PM. There is no action by coming
out of closed session. The next item on our
agenda is calendaring. We have our Association
of (audio cuts out). I am so sorry. We are back from closed
session at 3:33 PM. There’s no action coming
out of closed session. Next item on our agenda is calendaring. We have our Association of
Community College Trustees Conference next week. The week following is Over the Edge. You all still have a
few days to contribute to your favorite board chair
who’s going over the edge on your behalf and if
you don’t contribute, you can go with me. (laughing) (people laughing) In November, our board
date will be November 12th and the following day is
a scholarship reception to which you are all invited, recognizing scholarships students and then the Coordinating
Board Leadership Conference in Austin November 21st and 22nd. Board day in December will be on the 10th with fall graduation on the 13th. Anything else for our calendar? If something comes up between time, you can always let Ms. Pettis
know or Ms. Villareal know and they’ll be happy to
add that to our calendar. With no other business, our
meeting is adjourned at 3:34 PM. (dramatic music)