Discover your Future in Health at Adelaide | Medicine

Discover your Future in Health at Adelaide | Medicine

August 25, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Welcome to the Faculty of Health Medical
Sciences showcase this is our session regarding our Bachelor of Medicine and
Bachelor of Surgery program. Thank you for attending in person today and
welcome to our online viewers as well. We acknowledge and pay respects to the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians whose ancestral lands we gather on today. We acknowledge the deep
feeling of attachment and relationship of the Kaurna people to country and we
respect and value the past, present, and ongoing connection to the land and
cultural beliefs. And it’s my pleasure to introduce to you the Dean of Medicine and the head of
the Adelaide Medical School, Professor Ian Symonds. Thank You Nicole welcome
everybody thank you for coming along on this slightly wet and cool grey Adelaide
morning. And welcome to our wonderful Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building. I’d like to
welcome everybody who is listening in to today’s presentation online through Facebook live. I would like
to tell you a little bit about the Faculty of Health and the Medical School
and some of the facilities that we have for research and teaching and learning
particularly in the biomedical precinct here and then talk about the medical
degree specifically. After which, Nicole is going to talk a little bit about the
admissions process and our Bachelor of Health and Medical Science degree and
some of the mechanisms we have supporting students who are studying
here in health at the University of Adelaide and then we will have a
question-and-answer session with our student panel here and I’d like to thank
Abby and Andre for coming along this morning to take part in that and
hopefully give as much time as we can for questions but obviously if there’s
anything further that you want to ask after the presentation I’ll be around,
Nicole will be around and we provide you with contact details if you want to
follow up on that so first of all a little bit about the
University of Adelaide, if you will perhaps no some of this already, Adelaide is the third oldest university in Australia and in the top one percent of University
Rankings worldwide we have been associated with more Nobel Prize winners
than any other university in Australia including two Nobel Prize winners in
medicine which I’ll come back to later we currently sit as a university within
the top 150 in all of the major world rankings and our part of the Group of
Eight universities of the research intensive universities of Australia the
University has over 4,000 staff about 2,700 students of which currently just
over a quarter are international students and we have over a hundred
countries represented in our student population we are truly South
Australia’s global university as you can see as you know our main campuses are
located on North Terrace but we also have campuses at weight and Roseworthy
and our rural clinical school has clinical school campuses spread out
across rural and remote South Australia the Faculty of Health Sciences is ranked
number one in South Australia for sciences and medical degrees and number
one in Australia at the health and medical science research in the
australian research reports from 2018 it’s also ranked number one in South
Australia for medicine nursing psychology and dentistry as I mentioned
we have some very illustrious alumni including Dr Robin Warren who was able
to demonstrate the that gastric ulceration was caused by a bacterial
infection which he did by swallowing a sample of the bacterial infection
himself and then showing that he could treat it so putting certainly science
first and then perhaps even more noteworthy Lord Howard Florey who was
awarded a Nobel Prize for his work on development depends
which is estimated to have saved over a hundred million lives in the 20th
century truly one of the greatest figures of the 20th century and who
studied medicine on a scholarship at the University of Adelaide we also have
numerous roads and Fulbright Scholars most recently Dr Claudia Paul who was
awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to undertake a master’s of international
health and topical medicine at University of Oxford Claudia who
graduated from medicine here in 2017 is only the third ever Indigenous student
to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in Australia and Ethan Dutcher
one of our 6-year medical students awarded the Gates Cambridge scholarship
valued at over a quarter of a million dollars so congratulations to both
Claudia and Ethan and I think it just shows that this is an atmosphere and
environment in which you can aspire to the greatest of achievements the Faculty
of Health is one of the five faculties within the University and comprises five
schools the Adelaide Medical School which I lead the dental school nursing
school the School of Psychology and the School of Public Health all of these
except for the School of Psychology are essentially based largely in this
building students intermingle from the day one that they begin their courses
and we believe strongly in the importance of students learning and with
from and with other professional groups that they are going to work with once
they graduate as I mentioned our degrees ranked first in the state in the world
rankings for all of these major areas overall a medicine is in the top 100 of
medical schools in the world and the QS rankings and ranked 6th overall in
Australia out of the Group of Eight you’re sitting today in the Health and Medical Sciences building. The Health and Medical Sciences building opened two years ago it is a two hundred and fifty million dollar investment by the
University and the federal government in medical sciences and health education
and it represents the largest single investment by the University of Adelaide
in teaching and research infrastructure in its history the building includes the
first three floors that are predominantly dedicated to teaching then
four floors of laboratory space the School of Public Health and dentistry
and then finally and the top two levels of the building is the Adelaide Dental
Hospital which is our main teaching Dental Hospital it is of course located
right in the heart of this Adelaide’s biomed city a few metres from the South
Australian Health and Medical Research Institute where many of our researchers
are also based and to the Royal Adelaide Hospital which is our principal teaching
hospital and where many of our clinical affiliates and titleholders work in
their clinical practice the building here we have is based home
to over 600 research and about 1700 students both doing undergraduate and
postgraduate study and again I mentioned how important we think it is for our
students to mix socially and in terms of learning with students from other
professional groups but being in the same building as where cutting-edge
medical research is taking place also provides an opportunity for our students
not only to learn from people who are world experts in their field but also to
take part in that research at various points during their undergraduate and
postgraduate studies I just like to point out one particular part of the
facility here of which we are especially proud in terms of education and training
and encourage you if you have the opportunity to go and have a look around
upstairs and that’s the Adelaide health simulation centre so Adelaide health
simulation is where students from all of our degrees including medicine have an
opportunity to develop their clinical team-working communication and
diagnostic skills in preparation for real clinical practice but also to
continue to reinforce those skills of more advanced learning even while they
are undertaking real-life patient experience in the latter part of the
medical course we have the largest simulation facility in Australasia at
the moment that’s just become the first facility in the southern hemisphere to
be awarded accreditation by the Society for Simulation Healthcare in the US we
have 24 different simulation rooms ranging from everything from a GP
consultation to a hospital ward room through to an intensive care or an
operating theatre or a neonatal resuscitation facility and the building
itself is supported by a core of professionally
trained actors who act as standardised patients for a range of scenarios as
well as high fidelity manikins which we use to simulate both surgical and
non-surgical clinical care so really this provides a unique opportunity for
our students in terms of teaching and learning throughout the course and
students will begin to use the health simulation facility from really the
first month of their medical studies here medicine is one of those things that you
can’t learn off paper the sim lab is one of the rare opportunities we have in
preclinical medicine to really practice and hone skills that we will need in the
hospital the simulation classes run very well to emulate the real-world skills
that really can’t be practiced in any other way really does get you excited about learning. You can see how things go from a textbook into actual real life
I think that’s a really good thing to learn from first year or so being how
would you say that today was pretty amazing all the stages of labor that we
were able to see and go through and to also be able to do with the med students
and then we’ve had them as well helping us to guide us through that I thought it
was really really amazing it’s a very rare circumstance where you would be in
isolation traditionally we’ve taught people as if it’s their day in isolation
with the royalties it’s not like that so if the opportunity to do it in a
simulation is valuable because so if they get to do practice team work with
the people from other disciplines and medicine in particular we are incredibly
proud to be delivering world-class into professional learning opportunities to
our future health professional Adelaide health simulation contributes to a high
quality safe patient health care and we achieve this by providing excellence in
both simulation and clinical schools teaching okay so as you can tell we place great
emphasis on preparing our graduates for the workplace afterwards of course the
nature of health degrees medicine nursing dentistry and so forth is that
they perhaps have a clearer link into a future career paths and many other
degree programs but it’s still important in that context that our graduates are
as prepared as they can be for that step into the workplace and the stresses that
that imposes upon them and also for providing the generic skills that are
going to equip them for a lifetime during which they will see some pretty
fundamental changes in the nature of what it means to be a health care
practitioner and the way health care work and not only do our degrees provide
an opportunity for students to progress into the career path which is associated
with the name of this particular professional degree but they also opens
up a whole range of opportunities in other areas of professional practice
with a health degree as the basis for them and I’ll say a little bit more
about that in a second in relation to medicine so to talk a little bit about the
medical degree specifically so as I mentioned the thought not only is a
delayed the third oldest University it was the third to establish a medical
degree what many of you may not know is that it was also the first to graduate a
female medical practitioner in fact Adelaide accepted women into degree
programs 40 years before they were accepted into degrees of doctors in
Cambridge and nearly a hundred years before they’re accepted in to degrees
and Stanford so we’ve had many illustrious alumni obviously from the
University of Adelaide who have been women and a roughly 50% of our medical
intake at the moment are in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery you
learn from both clinicians and scientists over the course of our six
year program in our teaching facilities here and across the state in South
Australia we encourage we begin with the development of clinical and
communication skills as I have mentioned in the video really from almost the
first week of the program and certainly throughout the six years of the program
there’s a strong focus on clinical and professional skills training the heart
of our teaching paradigm is around working in small groups to solve
problems relating to health and disease the volume of medical knowledge is
enormous and growing by the day and really the fundamental skill that is
needed to navigate that for now and in the future is the ability to discern
which information is the most evidence base to critically appraise that and to
know where to go to get the most up-to-date information and so we place a
strong emphasis on our learning on developing that independent lifelong
learning culture in our students that equips them to work as part of teams to
solve solve complex problems and to understand where they need to go to
obtain the best possible evidence to make their decisions as I’ll come on to a minute really the
first part of the medical program is predominantly a campus based experience
but in the second part of the program students learn through clinical
placements across a range of hospitals in metropolitan South Australia in
community and general practice settings and in rural settings ranging all the
way from Broken Hill across the Sedona one of the unique features of our
program is the importance that we place in the final year on preparation for
that step to internship and particularly in our pre internship program in the
last two AMC surveys of work preparedness Adelaide has been rated in
the top four by its graduates for being best prepared for clinical practice of
any of the medical programs in Australia so as I mentioned the program is six
years and in years one two three students are based here and on the main
campus on from’ road where they undertake a systems-based approach to
problem solving common sets of health problems and in doing so they learn of
the normal and abnormal processes of the human body so the core of our teaching
is what’s called case based learning where students work in groups of eight
to ten working through a clinical scenario each week to and through that
then with the support of lectures practical sessions clinical skills
training simulation and so forth they learn all about the different various
different body systems in the third year of the program they begin clinical
placements with one day a week in one of the teaching hospitals in Adelaide where
they begin to put into practice what they’ve learned in simulation studying
by talking to patients taking histories and presenting those histories
going through clinical examination and refining the skills that they’ve already
learned from you for onwards students are in full-time clinical attachments
starting with the fundamentals of medicine and surgery orthopedics moving
on in year five to a number of specialist rotations such as Pediatrics
and geriatrics and then finally after the major barrier exam in year five
focusing on a year-long pre internship program during which they will also have
the opportunity to take elective study both within Adelaide and abroad and
about 80% of our students will spend at least six weeks of their program outside
of Australia studying across the program I just like to say a little bit more
about year five of the program which is where our longitudinal integrated rural
clinical program takes place so throughout the clinical part of the
program students have the opportunity to do placements in rural and remote South
Australia our clinical school is based mainly in the Barossa, Whyalla, Port
Augusta Port Lincoln Ceduna and in the fifth year of the
program about a quarter of our student will undertake the entire year in one of
those clinical centers under doing an immersion program where they cover the
same topic material as their metropolitan counterparts but do so
attached to a general practice throughout that year and learning about
presentations as they occur in the rural environment and how the challenges of
healthcare in that environment differ finally as I said in the sixth year of
the program the focus is on rotations again in those areas where students will
be doing internships such as emergency surgery medicine and then an opportunity
to explore some other areas in more detailed interest in mental health
community surgery and edson in the the half of the program I should also
mention our student exchange program in year five we’re up to eight students a
year spend six months of their degree at Aarhus University in Denmark and we
takes eight of their students to do six months of study in the subjects and gynaecology and pediatrics in Adelaide so there are plenty of opportunities for
those who are interested to explore the wider world of medical practice medicine
obviously leads in most cases to a career in general practice or in an area
of specialty practice but it can in fact lead to a wide range of career choices
and as well as working in health organisations outside of the public or
private hospitals structure we have obviously graduates who work in academic
university centers in non-governmental organisations in the Defence Forces and
across a range of industry and government organisations including
politics and the media I just want to say a few words about what becoming a
good doctor involves the first thing to say is that medicine is quite unlike
other university degrees I mean apart from the length of it the intensity of
study that is required at the full time nature of the study that is required
requires a very significant personal commitment and every year I’m absolutely
blown away by the quality of the applicants that we get for our medical
program they truly represent the most outstanding young men and women that our
society has to offer but becoming a doctor also involves the ability to
apply knowledge and understand it at both the individual and the community
and indeed now the global level mastering the aspects of Professional
Conduct communication empathy and putting the patient at the center of
everything that they do and maintaining and building their core body of medical
knowledge through self-directed learning and contributing to or at least
understanding the mechanisms by which medical research take place and that
have informed our knowledge of how the body works and how disease happens as I
mentioned medical degree can take you on a number of different career pathways as
well as clinical practice and increasingly I think people are moving
through different stages of their medical careers which focus primarily
perhaps on clinical practice in the first instance and then often in an
extensive role of leadership roles and and increasingly we are seeing it as
part of the skill set that we want to imply to our graduates to equip them
with the skills to advocate on behalf of their communities and their patients for
better healthcare so this is Daniella, Daniella one of our graduates just give you an opportunity to read
that for a sec okay so I’m gonna hand over to Nicole
now to talk a little bit about admissions but I would just like to sort
of summarise by saying what is really fantastic about studying this and in the
University of Adelaide is this amazing combination of learning in the world’s
best teaching and training facilities the most up-to-date teaching hospital
the most state-of-the-art simulation centre in the world
it’s the opportunity to gain an enormous amount of clinical experience before
starting as work as an actual doctor by length of the program and by the
opportunities and things like our diverse range of clinical placements
provide in places like our rural clinical stories and there’s a chance to
be part of a student community which has a student society itself that is more
than a hundred years old and which provides an atmosphere of peer support
and collegiality which means that our graduates form part of a community of
peers and Friends that stay with them for the whole of their professional
careers so with that I’ve just handed over to Nicole to talk a bit about
admissions thank you to Professor Symonds for the insight into the program and
will further extend that when we invite the student panel up fairly shortly but
now I want to run through and the admissions process for you to give you a
little bit more detail about that sometimes it can be a little bit complex
so I’m will aim to demystify some of that for you today so as you can see on
the screen we have developed some really detailed admissions guides and please
note that there are two versions that we have now so one is for domestic
applicants and one is for international applicants and we’d encourage you to
access the correct one so that you’re getting the details that you need to be
able to apply they are available online and we can send them out to you once the
session is over today as well okay so this is going to focus on the process
for our domestic applicants there are some prerequisite subjects that you
would need to complete throughout your high school studies
and for those students in year 12 now that is chemistry biology or mathematics you don’t need all three just one of those and you just need to
pass it there’s no particular score that we look for you need to pass that
prerequisite subject so we’re looking for a minimum ATAR of 90 or above
okay that’s nine zero and for an IB score that is 33 or above okay now all
of you should have registered for the UCAT if you are considering entry
in 2020 so that has now closed so we hope that you have registered
accordingly for that step four is that you then sit the UCAT test and then
that determines whether we actually invite you for an interview whether
you’re eligible to come for an interview in step seven I’ll talk a little bit
more about the UCAT in a moment step five is the SATAC application which is done
online and they open in August and close quite promptly in September so please as
soon as they open make sure that you apply so that you don’t miss out and for
the majority of you your schools can help you with that but it’s quite easy
to do yourselves at home online as well we notify you on of your eligibility
down the track and then you will log into an admission system that we give
you access to and check whether you’re eligible to be invited for an interview
if you are then we link you to actually go and book that interview if you’re not
then that’s the chance that you would have to activate your backup plans and
we’ll talk about that a little bit more in a moment
then we have an interview process as well which is held here in the Adelaide
Health and Medical Sciences building and then hopefully offers come out to you
all okay so we often get asked how many places we have in our degree and for
domestic students we have a hundred and thirty nine Commonwealth supported
places and that’s broken down further into 42 places for applicants from a
rural background four places for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
applicants and then twenty places for higher education
pathway applicants as well the rest is all made up of school leavers like
yourselves in the room today I might just go back a little bit and talk about
the you catch so many of you will have heard that UMAT before as the
entrance test that has now changed and that is no longer it has been replaced
with you cat so that is a clinical aptitude test that we use to determine
eligibility for an interview but more importantly it tells us a lot about you
and some of the aspects of you personally that we’re looking for to
make good clinicians in the future so we don’t endorse any particular you cat
training materials that’s completely up to you how you prepare for that but I
really encourage you to log on to the UK website there’s a lot of detail on there
and there’s also some practice materials as well that you can practice and
understand the particular test so the University of Adelaide will be using
your score each of the we’re going to only use four sections of the five
sections so the situational judgment test we won’t be using to determine your
eligibility for interview so we will be using sections one to four and they will
be equally weighted to determine that eligibility that doesn’t mean that you
can take it easy in section five we would still encourage you to complete
the test in fall because you may be looking at other options as well and
they may use that part of the test so complete the test in fall so we talked
about the eligibility so on the 29th of October is when you will actually
receive information from the University and that’s where you log in to check
your eligibility for an interview we often get asked what we’re looking
for in the interview and within those admissions guides that I mentioned to
you earlier there is some criteria that we’re actually looking for so have a
look have a look at the details of that but more importantly we really encourage
you to be ourselves we can’t get a sense of who you are if you’re telling us what
you think we want to hear it’s really important to us that we understand who
you are you know why you’re wanting to do this how what’s what’s your you know
sort of future plans and what is it about you that’s going to make you stand
out from the crowd so really come in with a conversation come in with some
positivity and just come in being yourselves and that actually makes it
easy for us to determine how we think you will fare the interviews are in two
sections so you will see two interviewers for one section then you
have some reading time and then you’ll come in and see another two interviews
so in total you will see four interviewers all together okay there is
more information in the guides about the breakdown of that as well okay so for
our international entry there are again prerequisite subjects which are
chemistry maths or biology there’s an academic score which is the
International ATAR of 90 or above there are some English language
requirements that our international students must adhere to and that is an
IELTS level of seven there’s an online application and then instead of the you
catch you would set the personal qualities assessment test and it’s it’s
used in this in a very similar way and essentially drawing out the same
qualities for those applicants as well you will receive interview eligibility
as well based on your performance in the pqa and determines whether you’re
eligible for an interview you come and sit the interview and then you have
offers as well for the international students it’s important to note that we
can do the interviews and via video conferencing as well so for anyone
that’s viewing this session online today you don’t have to come to Australia
although it’s a great opportunity to see the facilities we
and do the interviews elsewhere as well but for international applicants I won’t
go into that further I’d encourage you to have a look at the guide to make
sense of all of that okay entry to medicine is quite competitive and we
would encourage you all to have a back-up plan I often get asked I don’t
need a back-up plan I don’t want to have a back-up plan but we really encourage
you to have one because there are other ways for you to achieve your goals in
medicine and that may be that you come in to another degree like health and
medical sciences and I can see a few faces of people that are here we’re here
in the previous session but the health and medical sciences degree is a really
health focused degree it’s talking about what can go wrong with the human body
and how you’re going to attempt to fix it and it is a good option if you don’t
get into medicine the first time so you know from previous slides that we do
have some places available for students that are studying at the University of
Adelaide in the health and medical sciences degree and you do get the
opportunity to try again for entry to medicine if that’s where you really want
to go having said that if you don’t end up going into medicine it’s a fantastic
degree to complete and then look at some postgraduate studies in medicine down
the track so for the students here who think if they don’t get into medicine
that that’s it it’s the end of the line for them it really isn’t you’ve got a
lot of options and I’d really encourage you to explore those so that you can
keep keep them open it may be that you don’t go directly in your pathway may be
a little bit curved but that’s okay you can get there in the end and you just
might find that you know health and medical sciences can can give you
alternative options that you hadn’t considered before so make sure that you
always have a back-up plan that’s just a little bit more about the health and
medical sciences degrees as you can see it’s human biology focused there’s a lot
of public health within it which helps you to understand what affects different
communities you will get some research as well and working here within this
building in some of the clinical skills facilities that you saw in the video a
little be earlier as well okay there may be
some more questions about the admissions process and we’ll be happy to answer
those a little bit later on but for now we’re going to talk a little bit about
the student experience and then we’ll introduce our panel as well so within
not only the Adelaide Medical School but within the Faculty of Health and Medical
Sciences we have a lot of support available to you and Professor Symonds
talked a little bit more about that as well it’s also about making sure that
you’re aware of the networks and who can help you if you need it so we have a
full team that are located down on frame Road who can actually help you with all
of those areas there that are on the screen some of those won’t mean much to
you now but they will when you come into the program we have a very successful
peer mentoring program which is actually run by students for students so
particularly coming into medicine it is a big change as Professor Symonds
mentioned it’s a big commitment and so there are lots of things that will be
very different from high school and I’m sure the student panel will be able to
talk to you about that in more detail shortly but this particular program is
an informal way of allowing you to network to meet with other students and
really just find your feet at university so I’d encourage you to have a look at
this program when you’re made and when you come into the program it’s senior
year students who have sat exactly where you are a couple of years ago and can
give you the tips and tricks to help you succeed at University for our Indigenous
applicants we have support as well in a cultural sense as well as all of the
other areas that we’ve mentioned previously and we have a dedicated
Indigenous Student Support Officer who will be your go-to person throughout the
experience here at the University we do have a full range of scholarships I’m
not going to go into too much detail now but if you are made an offering to the
program that’s when you can have a look at what’s available and we’d encourage
you to apply for all of them sometimes they’re going and awarded so the more
you apply for the better that will be and we also have a scholarship for five
commencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in how
to assist them in in their entry to medicine or their experience in medicine
the school is very dedicated to encouraging Indigenous students to apply
and this is one way that we can help them,. Okay so now I’m going to
hand over to our student panel this is your time to ask questions about what
it’s really like to be a student within the faculty so I’d like to welcome Abby
and Andre to the floor I’ll let them introduce themselves but please ask any
questions and to our online viewers as well now’s your chance to to speak with
the students thank you so I wonder if I could ask our student
ambassadors first if they could have to tell us a little bit about themselves
and their journey into how they came to be studying medicine
hello around good morning so my name is Abby I’m a fourth year here at the
University of Adelaide in medicine and I’m originally from the Barossa Valley
so I moved down to the city four years ago to study medicine I
always knew that I wanted to be a doctor probably the classic story that a lot of
you could relate to and I’ve just absolutely loved my time here
Adelaide seem to be the obvious choice for me in terms of location but since
being in it’s meant so much more to be made to be a part of this community
talking to students from other universities studying medicine we have a
very unique culture and sense of belonging in the University of Adelaide
being a six year degree you really get to know everyone within the Uni and I
feel very lucky to be part of the community I guess looking forward to
hearing some of your questions and talking to you more about that so hi my
name is Andre I’m six years in my final year of medical school a little bit
about my role I guess to provide a different perspective is that I am last
year I had the honor of serving as the president of the surgical side and this
year I’m president of the critical care Society but I guess gone back a few more
years I was an athlete kid I sort of came to the decision to do medicine sort
of later on but I like have I think Adelaide regardless of whether
you’re looking at this date I think Adelaide is like the best place there’s
nowhere else where you can take a 20-minute tram get to the beach you know
see your friends drive like at anytime and I guess to reiterate the last
point about the culture of Adelaide the staff as well as the students I’ve
always felt like everyone belonged no one was too intimidating to approach
and that there’s heaps and heaps of mentor support one-on-one people doing
things here outside of their hours and volunteer into coaches through every
single thing you don’t understand or ask as much as many questions as you want
okay perhaps I could just also just get you to expand on that and in in kind of
two bits and what have been the highlights of the program for you so far
and what have been the things that you found most challenging in moving into
studying medicine you know the the things that you wish somebody had sort
of warned you about before handle that you think that people should know before
they undertake a degree in well I think the highlight for me and something that
I’ve been very lucky in is that there’s a lot of opportunities both within study and extracurricularly in medicine so I’m currently the vice
president of the medical student society and I’ve got to that point because I was
lucky enough to be involved in a lot of activities throughout which were
provided by the staff and also the your fellow students so I guess a highlight
for me is that you can be part of many different groups as Andre was saying
it’s got critical care surgery general practice lots of different things
medical orchestra that you can be a part of we write our musical every year which
is a lot of fun to be part of and I guess through that I met a lot of older
students and as Professor Symonds was saying earlier Adelaide is a very clinical
skills based program and that’s what I love about it is that it makes you feel
like you can actually be a competent doctor one day and when you go into the
hospital in later years that’s been a highlight for me this year my first year
of clinical practice is that I go in and I walk into the hospital and I recognise
half of the doctors already they were students here we were involved
in extracurricular activities together they’ll pull me aside for a tutorial it’s
very much a community and I guess that’s the nursing that are they being quite
small as well as that you know half the doctors when you get into the hospital
already I guess one of the challenges for me was obviously you work quite hard
in year twelve to get into medicine you’re naturally competent the fact that you
managed to get in but it is very intensive it’s a lot of your time and
it’s both a good and bad thing I really encourage you to have a think about
whether you are really invested in medicine and we do have a lot of other
great options in terms of the health and medical sciences degree which does give
you a bit of a taste of what medicines like if you would like to apply and you
can always transfer in got friends who transferred in from law even engineering
so it doesn’t mean that you can’t explore your options first
but yeah it’s a big commitment and it’s six years so I’d really encourage you to
have a think about that first so yes I’ll start off with the question about
like my the highlight of my medical experience obviously there’s been like
six years worth and I think it was more like last year that I started to feel
like more competent more ready to you know one day make an impact make my
contribution you know in the hospital you know outside in the clinics I guess
the story was that last year I was on my ICU rotation and it was just sort of one
ward round I was teaching the professor Prof Peek was you know give us a
tutorial ABG’s and one of the patients in the other room was having a heart
attack and they became like unresponsive so you know we were students who so just
followed everyone seemed to know what to do and we felt frightened I think
initially but I think that sort of those negative sort of emotions I think
reflecting back have turned into like the highlight of my experience the
professor asked us students to ask me specifically you know can you do
the CPR and this was a patient who was unresponsive I didn’t know anything
about the patient everyone else’s you know getting in a rush to get the
medication ready and I was doing CPR for almost like three or five minutes there was
another student I think from a different University who was supposed to change of
and they didn’t feel ready and I think as I was doing I started to feel like my
education at Adelaide sort of started to make sense that
everything had a difference I think a lot of it I could credit to the
simulation center we run these situations almost as if it’s real life
you’ve got sometimes like fake vomit on the floor that sort of thing
and I felt like you know I was doing things correctly I had the right
technique all those mentors started to come to me and in the patient
survives we weren’t able to shock the patient so at the end of the day that
you know the CPR of the the team effort I felt like no I actually did something
you know and I was a student thinking about the other question now about what
you know I wish I had known I think I’d like to talk about a personal example is
that I think especially when you’re coming out from year 12 you come out of
high school and the transition to medical school is and now you’re
surrounded by everyone who just seem to know what they’re doing that everyone
who’s attacked all-rounder it was you know school captains or they were you
know people who were respected in their you know in their friendship groups and
now we’re all together you know learning passion of at the same thing I think
something was hard to adjust was you know as the years went on I started to
realise that and we were all the same but everyone has their own strengths and
weaknesses and on the outside it might seem as if you know they have together
and you’re falling behind but in reality you’ve gone through the same struggles
and they will also look to you as the person who you know you have things
together and like you know you have things that they admire so I think the
take-home message for you know there’s young students here is that it’s got to
back yourself go for the things that make you feel
uncomfortable you know learn from those experiences and ask questions they’re
asked as much as you’d like Thanks so I think we’d like to open up
the opportunity for discussions and questions and answers as anybody got any
questions they would like to ask our students or indeed Nicole or myself, yeah so the question was how are you able to
keep up with your studies and do other things but do you mean like work or
extracurricular life in general yeah yeah that’s a great question ah I guess
the thing is is all about balance and obviously prioritizing your studies
first but I think the thing that I found very useful is a lot of your
extracurricular activities is with other medical students so you sort of have
this money studying while you’re doing the extracurricular activities type
thing so a lot of extracurriculars that we did was it’s very nerdy this is a
good thing about medicine it’s cool to be a nerd is that you would spend at
extracurricular time up in the sim labs were very lucky that Adam in the same
team will let us go up there and practice for things like there’s
something called the emergency medical challenge which you hear more about if
you get inside medicine which is basically that competition between other
unis practicing the simulations so I loved that and so things like that even
if you’re going to student society meetings or something like that you have
other students there that you can bounce off and the older students are always
very supportive that everyone wants you to pass in medicine and that’s the
unique thing different to high school is that I sort of came in I was like wow
for once you’re not competing against each other it’s all these right people
banding together so in your extracurriculars there’s a lot of time
where you probably are almost more productive than you would have been just
studying alone because you have that shared knowledge that you can sort of
talk through the different things that you’re studying at the time yeah it’s
really good question not fine especially in medicine healthcare it’s extremely
hard to do very easy for us to say you know to try to find a balance but to
actually do it commit to it is also showing me hard when you’ve got so many
competing priorities things that you’d like to do I think what I found was
helpful was to I guess be more disciplined and if I’m setting my mind
to do this it’s actually you know set up a limit to you know how much time I’d
want to spend on it reflect back on you know what could have been more effective
and at the moment actually use like you know very Gen Z, Millenial but I use
an app on my phone it’s called flora and actually blocks
off everything on your phone and your you set a time to other to study or you
know play music or anything like that and it sort of just blocks up the
distractions and you can’t access anything else while you were using it so
I think like when you have that session you do you it’s only been an hour rather
than sort of sitting at the computer and you’ve wasted the two hours trying to
get a start the other thing is I think it’s important to know what you like and
what you don’t like to know what you enjoy and also be realistic about your
expectations have some things that you don’t want to compromise on you know
like you know one day of the week where you want to you know walk the dog or
spend time with family I think making that time setting it earlier in the week
I think makes it easier to sort of make happen yeah so the question was how did you prepare
for the unit before you can as it is well I don’t think anybody quite knows
how they’ve prepared for the UCAT because this is the first year it’s been run but
the principles are probably much the same
yeah I I did that UMAT back then and now it’s change do you care for like
it’s always changing I think the very first thing is to again like reflect
back on what your strengths and weaknesses up I think there’s gonna be a
lot of people out there especially that you can’t this year making a lot of
promises guaranteeing in a result at the same time it’s an exam so it’s a very on
the day thing so you know you can prepare there’s a lot of resources out
there make an informed decision whether you liked you know extra training or you
know you can do it yourself but at the same time you also need to
take care of yourself like leading up to the day it’s an examination thing so you
need to have clear mind you need to know how you work under stress pay attention
to the time limit and not not stress too much about it because you can always set
it again and if it’s really worth I feel like everyone who once against medicine
eventually finds a way yeah I guess I just probably read it away right Andre
said and similar to before medicine there’s a lot about backing yourself I
think that’s what I learned from coming into medicine as I gained a lot more
confidence because you really do need to have the faith in yourself and yeah just
relax trust that you can do it try not to compare yourself to other paper which
I know is very hard but yeah and just take it in your own pace yeah I didn’t I
was up from the country I didn’t really know what UMAT was and no one from my school had really done medicine so I just used to like a distance package or
something which I found fine but yeah everyone has different ways but I know
people who didn’t or study at all why don’t people who did tutoring since they
were in year 11 for at like it’s very variable and you can get in anyway so yeah so the question was about the
higher education pathway is that right yeah yeah so we have 20 places for
students just from the University of Adelaide only you can’t have unstudied
elsewhere and we have a minimum of 20 places available for students studying
the health and medical sciences or advanced degree we can have more
students coming in from you know like Abby said before from law or engineering
but we definitely reserve those places for health and medical science and
students yeah sure okay so a couple of questions there
one was can you have studied something else like The Bachelor of Oral Health
absolutely you can have studied any other degree as long as it’s at the
University of Adelaide only okay and yes if you are studying another degree at
the University of Adelaide you would study that for at least one year and we
would use your grades from that year of study as the academic component for
entry instead of your year 12 scores and yes you would still need to set the you
catch and be eligible to be foreign interview so the process is exactly the
same it’s just that academic score comes from another method yep, sorry? For vet entry? TAFE? is that what you’re saying?
so the question was around entry to medicine via TAFE you would need to have
met the minimum academic score there’s not a direct pathway in so there would
be a pathway into a degree like health and medical sciences absolutely but not
directly into the medicine area through TAFE yep you’re welcome
any other questions yes of the back okay so the question was around
preparation and also how do you take care of yourself as well so that I’ll
let the panel answer that one thanks for your question I’ve just to clarify was
the question about working to get into medicine or while we’re in medicine how
do we balance yeah yeah okay yeah I guess I’m saying before it’s a lot about
knowing your limits and sort of recognizing the science of when you’re
seeming to burn out or when you’re starting to get distracted looking at
facebooking that sort of thing and I like to set myself like a checklist of
what I’m gonna do that day and just break it down into small steps it makes
you feel like you’ve accomplished a lot more and sort of just chatting to the
people around you getting a feel for how they’re going with their study in terms
of actual study techniques medicine is very broad and as Professor Symonds was
saying by the time you finish your degree a lot of the things that you
might have learnt will have changed so it’s a lot about learning how to find
information rather than just memorizing things there’s a lot about
problem-solving and just applying general principles rather than
memorizing specific study um it is very different in high school in that you do
your own study first and then you come to your tutor and you sort of discuss it
rather than being taught the material first sometimes and just to answer the
second question I guess what’s really important with medicine in is that it
isn’t all immersive degree and having an outlet outside of medicine it can become
very insular and it’s really important for example I play for the Union netball
club and I love that it’s sort of an outlet physical activity cannot be
understated and just yeah finding that balance relying on your networks outside
of medicine as well I’m sure you’ve got some better study tips than me okay I
guess I think everyone’s different to be honest in terms of study technique I
think I think you need to know like what you want to get out of it first in terms
of you know what’s the standard what’s the expectation and then sort of
applying that I think I’m not exactly great about just sort of
right and learning so I think what I found was really helpful was to learn by
doing to look by a teacher so and then lastly is sort of relating it to a
patient which you sort of get practiced through throughout the whole of medical
school so I guess learning by doing is – I guess if you’re doing an examination
to actually practice the examination put your hand up to do it because a lot of
times you know this that the tutor will asked you and then on sort of puts their
hand up and you don’t get that learning experience this medicine it’s not like a
textbook thing it’s not sitting on a computer it’s you know learning this
knowledge to put it together to help someone in front of you to help a
patient so a lot of cases I see the best way to sort of remember is to relate it
to something as someone that you’ve met like a patient or relate some of the
sayings that you learn from like the doctor or like a lot an older student
and also I think you medicine is so broad and there’s so much to study
especially some lectures that can go on for like a long time but you need to at
the end synthesize that like what would the take-home messages what what would
the important parts what can they ask your questions on so just being
strategic and using your time world the other thing about I guess you’re more of
your mental health your own emotional well-being I think it’s important to
remember that you don’t always have the door on your own it doesn’t have to be
something that you have to be your own superhero I think around you there’s
going to be so many people who feel the same way and I think just trying to
establish that support network from early on knowing who you can ask for
help whether that’s from faculty your GP I think every medical student should
have their own sort of person that they always see regularly and your friends as
well relying on them not feeling guilty that you know you do need help and that
you would like to talk and then at the same time also being someone who can
provide that giving time for others as well and it’s had an extra thing that I
thought of when I’m James talking one of the like more practical tips that I
would say for studying and retaining information because
there’s a lot of information to retain is that particularly we’re very lucky we
get a lot of face-to-face lectures and in medicine you actually get the leading
expert in that subject so we get specialists coming in like we had a
Professor Greenwood who’s one of the best burn
surgeons in Australia coming in and talking to us and I sort of challenged
myself every time because it’s cool to be a nerd at the end of every lecture to
ask a question and that means that you’ve actually had to put thought into
you okay what am I getting out of this lecture what do I not quite understand
and when you personally ask that question it sticks in your mind a lot
more because you have that memory similar to if you saw a patient with a
disease it’s a lot more memorable to you if you have that person or sort of
experience so I would encourage everyone to ask questions not be afraid to look
silly because everyone privileged to be super impressed with you but asking a
really bizarre question but it will be a lot more helpful for you in terms of
your learning if you ask questions put yourself out there use your resources
Thanks thank you and we’ve actually run out of time now but if you do have any
other questions on Professor Symonds and both Abby and Andre we’ll be outside in
the foyer and more than happy to spend some time finalizing those questions so
thank you for joining us today and thank you for our online audience as well we
hope to see many of you here as students in the future and thank you for
attending today and best of luck to everyone you