Community Partners: Making Student Learning Relevant

Community Partners: Making Student Learning Relevant

November 30, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


>>Ben: This is very well done.>>Student: Thank you.>>Ben: The recipe is a good one
and you executed it properly.>>Brent: If you have someone from the
community that walks into a classroom to help kids with a design project, it’s something that brings
meaning to student work. When you involve kids in the community
and the community with the kids, it’s providing relevancy to what
is being studied in the classroom.>>Our community itself is rich in
resources, and every community is and so it’s reaching out
and finding who can help, whether it be an engineer,
a local business person. Whether it be a local chef, I
mean, these are all professions that we’ve invited into our
schools, to either help teach or to evaluate the student work, or
to have our students present for them.>>Michael: When you put that
plate in front of somebody, the lettuce needs to be cold. The meat needs to be warm and the
potatoes need to be warm, right. All that kind of stuff. So judges will be here
in not too terribly long. Think it through.>>We have our student kitchen. Sixth graders do pretty basic
stuff, measurement and mixing and then seventh graders get more
complex, and eighth graders run cafes and get their food handlers card. And so we’ve started this thing
called Iron Chef, off the TV show. There are six teams, each of which
were given a list of the ingredients that are available to them. They had to develop recipes
and put a menu together. And it’s all about presentation
and how do they greet the people when they walk into their kitchen.>>Lauren: We’re going to have
I think four to six judges. It’s not going to be teachers. We are going to set up little plates
of food and they’re going to see which one they like the best.>>Michael: We try to,
as often as possible, have a real audience that comes in.>>Excellent, all right.>>Really validate the kids’ hard work
and get them excited about the level of detail that they’ve
been able to attain.>>Gerardo: So we’re going to
have a chef from Celilo come, and he’s going to be one of our judges. And basically, work harder
to show them what we’ve got.>>Michael: So each of
you gets six sheets. I’ve got pens, gentlemen.>>Ben: All right, after you. Start your engines.>>I am a judge for the Iron
Chef Hood River Middle School. My daughter is in this class and
they take this very seriously. It’s a class assignment. They’re going to get a grade. They understand that it’s something
from school, but it’s a competition, and I think that just ups the
level of everybody’s participation.>>Judge: Who’s next?>>Josephine: Usually in class there’s
like people who don’t care as much, but now that there’s people
like actually judging, you’re trying harder, which is good.>>Michael: We got the kids some amazing
feedback from some very critical judges. I think they’re pretty excited about
what they’re ready to pull off.>>Judge: That’s delicious.>>Student: Oh, good.>>Sarah: As a teacher, I
don’t have all the answers, and so I regularly access
outside professionals. And so Andrea at the Hood River
Historical Museum is somebody I connected with very quickly
and then I said, “Could you come do a variety of talks?”>>Andrea: So today, we are going
to talk a little bit about pioneers of Hood River and how they
are shaping your lives, your education and your school today.>>I’m Andrea Smith and I am at the
History Museum of Hood River County as the education and
volunteer coordinator. I will do everything from dress
up like a pioneer to bring in a few artifacts for
the kids to handle. Teach them about either Hood
River history, museums, archives. That’s the beginning of engaging them,
is bringing someone new in to listen to, to present them with new information.>>So from here, we’re going to go to
the museum and learn a little bit more about your history and
living in your era. You’re going to get to
see a school register. The actual register from
eighteen ninety-two. We’re going to locate those people
that are on the register in the photo. I’m hoping that this makes these
people really real for you guys.>>Henry: It’s kind of nice to get
a different perspective on things. It makes it a lot easier
to learn when people from museums come and
give us presentations.>>Andrea: And if you
look at these statistics, attendance really drops
off towards the end. Anyone have any idea why that could be?>>Aleyah: I know that it was really
hard for some people to get to school because of like the weather conditions,
or like they had to take care of– like they had to work for their
family or something like that.>>Andrea: Exactly.>>Aleyah: I think it’s really important
for people to learn outside of school, because it gives us a
better understanding of what we are like learning in school.>>Sarah: A kid who learns
how to interact with their community is somebody
who feels very comfortable going out in the community throughout life.>>Brent: So that’s a very
important part of what we do, is we engage our kids
with the community. We engaged our community with the kids.