Big Questions Ep. 28: Imperial College London

Big Questions Ep. 28: Imperial College London

August 26, 2019 48 By Stanley Isaacs


(building music note) (mellow R&B music) – I’m Sam Clark with Crimson
Education, and we’re here at Imperial College to
ask some big questions. All right, what is the
best thing about Imperial? – Well, there’s so many
activities, I think. So many societies and
stuff you can do around it. – The entire vibe of the community here, I think there are many brilliant people and you really benefit from that, and also the lecturers
and the guest speakers is all very high-quality. – The best thing about Imperial
is that you keep meeting new people you can have really
interesting discussions with. And yeah, I just love it. So in my hall, we start
talking about the origin of the universe, we
start talking about God or the connection between
God and quantum physics, and that’s what pretty cool. Over a quick lunch. – I think the environment,
the academic environment. – I love that it’s in London, so you have the connections,
the weather, the place. It’s such an awesome city, so I think it’s one of the best things. – They teach you things
that you are interested in, so you get option modules and
you get to pick out of those and pick the ones that you actually do have an interest in studying. – And now, what’s the
worst thing about Imperial? – The toilets seem to be
quite broken. (laughs) – Broken toilets? Okay, got it. – The food — I mean, not at
Imperial, but the country. – Just in general, around here. – Yeah. – So London earlier was a good thing, but it’s also a bad thing, because it’s actually quite expensive, again because we’re in
the center of London. – I can’t tell. – Can’t tell ya, okay. – That’s all right, that’s
probably a good thing. – I actually thought
was the central library. So they did a lot of
construction there, right? Before that term and it was — They also had some issues
with the air condition and now they are refurbished
everything so it’s much nicer but still, like, compared
to other universities, I think they could do a better job. – And what do you typically
do on weekends here? – Weekends are actually pretty chill. Normally you do things during the week. – You can go to societies
like work out, like if you are in sport societies
they usually have training. – Maybe go ’round London,
do some sports, walk a bit. – I’m all over London, basically. I always head to different
districts of London, there’s so much stuff to explore. I also do day trips to like maybe, I’m planning on going to Brighton now, or like see other places, like
Oxford or Cambridge as well. – I’d like to say I have a
social life and stuff, but no, I mainly just have a lot of
work to get done at the start, so I try to get that done and
then go out and socialize. That kind of thing. – Maybe a house party, or if
you decided to go to a club, or just chill at home. Oh, and also study, obviously. (laughs) – And study, and study. – So very, study, obviously! (laughs) And after that I go like
all the trainings with the societies, so I will say
this mostly, and parties. – What did you write your
application essay here, or personal statement, about? – I mentioned what I want to achieve, and what I hope from this university. – Why I wanted to join Imperial, as a uni, why this specific course, and what were my ambitions that
I wanted out of the course, and also what I would
contribute to the course. – I wrote about how I
loved numbers, basically, and how numbers fascinate
me and how I like to, I don’t know, explore patterns or find… Ah, I’m not sure what I wrote about. It was a while ago. But it was symmetries in
nature or something like that. – I wrote it mainly about my motivation, as to why I wanted to study at Imperial. And then I just briefly
glossed over examples of things that I’ve done that kind of
add to what I was saying. – Mine was about pacemakers,
so implanted pacemakers. I study biomedical engineering,
so, yeah, that was it. – Yeah, I do exactly the same
thing, but I did it about respiracites, which are like– It’s a concept, it’s not really done yet. They’re working on it. It’s a tiny particle where you can transport oxygen in that particle. It’ll be like a hundred
times more efficient than red blood cells, and you
can potentially just have a lot of oxygen without
actually needing to breathe, which obviously for many
things could be really useful. – Anything to add? – Not really, no. – I love it here. (laughs) – That’s a good final note. – Yeah, I would recommend it to everyone. – Perfect, thank you guys so much. Have a good one. (mellow R&B music) – If you like this video
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